Page images
PDF
EPUB
[merged small][ocr errors]

i

CONTENTS.

TxThoductory LETTER to the Right Hon. William Elliot, . - - - - -

Letters on a Regicide Peace, continued from Vol. IV.: Letter IV. to the Earl

Fitzwilliam, . . . . . . . . . . . . . -

Letter to the Empress of Russia, dated November, 1791, . . . . . . .
Letter to Sir Charles Bingham, Bart. dated October, 1773, on the Irish Ab-
senteeTax, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Letter to the Honourable Charles James Fox, dated October, 1777, on the

American War, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Letter to the Marquis of Rockingham, dated January, 1777, on a proposed
Secession from Parliament of Members who had opposed the American

- - - - - - - -

War, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

A proposed Address to the King, on the same subject, . . . . . .
Address to the British Colonists in North America, . . - - -

Letter to the Right Hon. Edmund Perry, Speaker of the House of Commons
of Ireland, dated July, 1778, on a Bill for the relief of His Majesty's Ro-
man Catholic Subjects in Ireland, . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Letter to Thomas Burgh, Esq. dated New-Year's Day, 1780, in vindication of
the Author's Parliamentary Conduct, relative to the Affairs of Ireland,
Letter to John Merlott, Esq. an eminent merchant of Bristol, dated April,
1780, on the same subject as the preceding letter, . . . . . . . .
Letters (to the Lord Chancellor, to the Earl Bathurst, and to Sir Grey Coo-
per) with Reflections on the Executions of the Rioters in 1780, . . . .
Letter to the Right Honourable Henry Dundas, one of His Majesty's Princi-
pal Secretaries of State, dated Easter Monday Night, 1792, with a Sketch
of a Negro Code, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Letter to the Chairman of the Buckinghamshire Meeting, held 13th April,

1780, at Aylesbury, on the Duration of Parliaments, and a more equal

Representation of the People, - - - - -

Tracts, relative to the Laws against Popery in Ireland, . - - - - -

Letter to William Smith, Esq. dated January, 1795; then Member of the

Irish Parliament, now one of the Barons of the Court of Exchequer in

Letter on the Affairs of Ireland, written in the Year 1797, . .

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

end
TO THE

An Abridgment of Exglish Histony; from the Intasion of Julius Caesar to the
of the Reign of King Johns—In Three Books:—Wir.

Book I. Char. I.-Causes of the Connexion between the Romans and Bri-

tains.—Caesar's two Invasions of Britain, . . . . . . . . 355

Chap. II.-Some Account of the ancient Inhabitants of Britain, . 36s

Chap. III.-The Reduction of Britain by the Romans, . - 377

Chap. IV.-The Fall of the Roman Power in Britain, . . . . 394

Book II. CHAr. I.-The Entry and Settlement of the Saxons, and their Con-

version to Christianity, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408

Char. II.-Establishment of Christianity; of Monastic Institutions; -

and of their Effects, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 412

Chap. III.-Series of Anglo-Saxon Kings from Ethelbert to Alfred;

with the Invasion of the Danes, . . . . . . . . . . . . 423

Chap. IV.-Reign of King Alfred, . . . . . . . . . . . . 427

Chap. V.-Succession of Kings from Alfred to Harold, . . . . . 433

Chap. VI.-Harold.—Invasion of the Normans—Account of that

People, and of the state of England at the time of the Invasion, . 441

Char. VII.-Of the Laws and Institutions of the Saxons, . . . . 448

Book III. Chap. I.-View of the state of Europe at the time of the Norman

invasion, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 471

Char. II.-Reign of William the Conqueror, . . . . . . 4c0

Char. III.-Reign of William the Second, surnamed Rufus, 500

Char. IV.-Reign of Henry I. . . . . . . . . . . . 508

Chap. V.-Reign of Stephen, . . . . . . . . . . . . . 516

Chap. VI.-Reign of Henry II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 521

Ch Ap. VII.-Reign of Richard I. . . . 544

Char. VIII.-Reign of John, . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352

Char. IX. —Fragment: An Essay towards an History of the Laws of

England. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 570.

RIGHT HON. WILLIAM ELLIOT.

---

My DEAR siR,

As some prefatory account of the materials, which compose this second posthumous volume of the works of Mr. Burke, and of the causes which have prevented its earlier appearance, will be expected from me, I hope I may be indulged in the inclination I feel to run over these matters in a letter to you, rather than in a formal address to the public. Of the delay that has intervened since the publication of the former volume, I shall first say a few words. Having undertaken, in conjunction with the late Dr. Lawrence, to examine the manuscript papers of Mr. Burke, and to select and F. for the press such of them as should be thought proper or publication, the difficulties attending our co-operation were soon experienced by us. The remoteness of our places of residence in summer, and our professional and other avocations in winter, opposed perpetual obstacles to the progress of our undertaking. Soon after the publication of the fourth volume, I was rendered incapable of attending to any business, by a severe and tedious illness. And it was not long after my recovery, before the health of our invaluable friend began gradually to decline; and soon became unequal to the increasing labours of his profession, and the discharge of his parliamentary duties. At length we lost a man, of whom, as I shall have occasion to speak more particularly in another part of this undertaking, I will now content myself with saying, that, in my humble opinion, he merited, and certainly obtained with those best acquainted with his extensive learning and information, a considerable rank amongst the eminent persons who have adorned the age in which we have lived, and of whose services the public have been deprived by a premature death. From these causes little progress had been made in our work, when I was deprived of my coadjutor. But from that time you can testify of me, that I have not been idle. You can bear witness to the confused state in which the materials, that compose the present volume, came into my hands. The difficulty TOL. W. 1

of reading many of the manuscripts, obscured by innumerable erasures, corrections, interlineations, and marginal insertions, would perhaps have been insuperable to any person less conversant in the manuscripts of Mr. Burke than myself. To this difficulty succeeded that of selecting from several detached papers, written upon the same subject and the same topics, such as appeared to contain the author's last thoughts and emendations. When these difficulties were overcome, there still remained, in many instances, that of assigning its proper place to many detached members of the same piece, where no direct note of connexion had been made. These circumstances, whilst they will lead the reader not to expect, in the cases to which they apply, the finished productions of Mr. Burke, imposed upon me a task of great delicacy and difficulty, namely, that of deciding upon the publication of any and which of these unfinished pieces. I must here beg permission of you, and Lord Fitzwilliam, to inform the public, that in the execution of this part of my duty I requested and obtained your assistance. Our first care was to ascertain from such evidence, internal and external, as the manuscripts themselves afforded, what pieces appeared to have been at any time intended by the author for publication. Our next was, to select such, as though not originally intended for publication, yet appeared to contain matter that might contribute to the gratification and instruction of the public. Our last object was to determine, what degree of imperfection and incorrectness in papers of either of these classes ought, or ought not, to exclude them from a place in the present volume. This was, doubtless, the most nice and arduous part of our undertaking. The difficulty, however, was, in our minds, greatly diminished by our conviction, that the reputation of our author stood far beyond the reach of injury from any injudicious conduct of ours in making this selection. On the other hand, we were desirous that nothing should be withheld, from which the public might derive any possible benefit. Nothing more is now necessary, than that I should give a short account of the writings which compose the present volume, I. Fourth LETTER on Regicide Peace. Some account has already been given of this letter in the advertisement to the fourth quarto volume. That part of it which is contained between the first and the middle of the page 60, is taken from a manuscript which, nearly to the conclusion,

« PreviousContinue »