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Whore was written. It was acted at the
Phenix in Drury Lane by the Queen's
Servants, and published in 1633. It was
one of the plays appropriated by the
Phænix or Cockpit Theatre in 1639.

The foundation of the plot may possibly have been taken from a slight notice in Bandello. There is a story in Rosset's Histoires Tragiques de Nostre Temps (1615), entitled “ Des Amours Incestueuses d'un Frère et d'une Sæur, et de leur fin Malheureuse et Tragique,'' which Ford may have read; but it has little resemblance to this play. The brother and sister are named Lyzaran and Doralice. Doralice was married to a rich old man. Subsequently, having gathered together her jewels, she is taken on to her brother's horse and the lovers flee together. After wandering in many places they take refuge in Paris, are arrested, condemned to death, and beheaded. This is said to have actually happened in France in the reign of Henry IV.

The play was very well received, and the actors earned "general commendation.”

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To my Friend the Author.
With admiration I beheld this Whore,
Adorned with beauty such as might restore
(If ever being, as thy Muse hath famed)
Her Giovanni, in his love unblamed :
The ready Graces lent their willing aid ;
Pallas herself now played the chambermaid,
And helped to put her dressings on. Secure
Rest thou that thy name herein shall endure
To the end of age ; and Annabella be
Gloriously fair, even in her infamy.

THOMAS Ellice.1

1 Probably Thomas Ellis (or Ellys), of Wyham, Lincolnshire, who was made a baronet by Charles ÍI. He was perhaps a brother of Mr. Robert Ellice, one of the three respected friends” to whom Ford inscribed The Lover's Melancholy, and also the friend of Davenant.

To the Truly Noble JOHN, EARL OF PETERBOBOUGH, LORD MOR.

DAUNT, BARON OF TURVEY.1

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My Lord,

HERE a truth of merit hath a general

warrant, there love is but a debt, acknowledgment a justice. Greatness cannot often claim virtue by inheritance ; yet, in

this, yours appears most eminent, for that S you are not more rightly heir to your fortunes than glory shall be to your memory. Sweetness of disposition ennobles a freedom of birth ; in both your lawful interest adds honour to your own name, and mercy to my presumption. Your noble allowance of these first fruits of my leisure in the action emboldens my confidence of your as noble construction in this presentment; especially since my service must ever owe particular duty to your favours by a particular engagement. The gravity of the subject may easily excuse the lightness of the title, otherwise I had been a severe judge against mine own guilt. Princes have vouchsafed grace to trifles offered from a purity of devotion ; your lordship may likewise please to admit into your good opinion, with these weak endeavours, the constancy of affection from the sincere lover of your deserts in honour,

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1 John, first Earl of Peterborough, obtained that title in the year 1627-8. He was brought up in the Roman Catholic faith, but was converled by a disputation at his own house between Bishop Usher and a Catholic, who confessed himself silenced by the just hand of God for presuming to dispute without leave from his superiors. He joined the Parliamentary army in 1642, was made General of the Ordnance and colonel of a regiment of foot, under E:sex, and died in the same year,

JOHN FORD.

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DRAMATIS PERSONA.

BONAVENTURA, a Friar.
A CARDINAL, Nuncio to the Pope.
SORANZO, a Nobleman.
FLORIO, 1

{ Citizens of Parma.
DONADO, I
GRIMALDI, a Roman Gentleman.
GIOVANNI, Son of FLORIO.
BERGETTO, Nephew of DONATO.
RICHARDETTO, a supposed Physician. .
VASQUES, Servant to SORANZO.
POGGIO, Servant to BERGETTO.
Banditti, Officers, Attendants, Servants, &c.

ANNABELLA, Daughter of FLORIO.
HIPPOLITA, Wife of RICHARDETTO.
PHILOTIS, Niece of RICHARDETTO.
PUTANA, Tutoress to ANNABELLA.

SCENE-PARMA.

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ACT THE FIRST.
SCENE I.-Friar BONAVENTURA’s Cell.

Enter Friar and GIOVANNI.
B

R IAR. Dispute no more in this ; for

know, young man, o e These are no school-points ; nice

philosophy
May tolerate unlikely arguments,
But Heaven admits no jest : wits that

presumed
On wit too much, by striving how to prove
There was no God with foolish grounds of art,
Discovered first the nearest way to hell,
And filled the world with devilish atheism.
Such questions, youth, are fond : 1 far better 'tis
To bless the sun than reason why it shines;
Yet He thou talk'st of is above the sun.
No more! I may not hear it.
| Gio.

Gentle father,
To you I have unclasped my burdened soul,
Emptied the storehouse of my thoughts and heart,
Made myself poor of secrets; have not left
Another word untold, which hath not spoke

i Vain.

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