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fensive armour. 'duplicat - dolore,' and, having pierced the man, bends him down convulsively with the pain.

648 - 52. ‘Amazon'; Camilla is so called from her resemblance to these warrior women. Unum - pugnæ,' one breast uncovered for the fight; see Book I. 492. and note. And now throus a shower of pliant spears from her hand. 'arma Dianæ'; spears and arrows.

654. Turning her bow, as she fled, she directs the arrous backwards.

657 - 60. . quas - ministras,' whom the divine Camilla had chosen to grace her train, as excellent assistants both in peace and war. "Threicie Amazones'; see note to Book V. 311. quum - Pulsant,' when they dance upon the banks of the river Thermodon, in Asia Minor; tbe Amazons once dwelt on the borders of this stream : bellantur'; here a deponent verb.

661 - 3. seu — refert,' or when the warlike Penthesilea returns in her chariot : "lunatis peltis'; see Book I. 490-1, and note. Hippolyten'; another queen of the Amazons; she became the wife of Theseus.

666 - 7. cujus — pectus,' whose uncovered breast turned towards her she pierced with a long spear of fir.

669 - 74. moriens — versai,' and dying rolls over in the blood that flowed from his wound. 'supér,' for 'præterea.' 'revolutus,' having

fallen from: labenti,' to his falling companion : pariter'; they were struck in such quick succession, that they seemed to fall at the same moment. ' incumbens — hastâ,' exerting herself to hurl the spear from afar.

676. Ignotis,' unusual, of a new kind : equo lapyge,' with his Apulian horse; see note to 247.

680 - 4. caput - albis,' the huge mouth and jaws of a wolf with its white teeth corered his head : "sparus,' a lance. et - est,' and he is a whole head taller than the others. exceptum – verso,' haring overtaken him, for there was no difficulty in this, the ranks being routed.

687 - 8. * Advenit — redarguerit, the time has come for confuting your boastful words by a woman's arms. Nomen,' reputation.

692 - 5. quâ — Lucent,' where his neck appeared uncovered, as he sat on horseback: "fugiens — sequentem, flying swiftly, and riding round in a great circle, she deceives him by describing an interior circle, and really pursurs him who seems to pursue her.

696 - 701. •Congeminat securim,''deals repeated blows of the are. • Incidit huic, happens to meet her. The warlike son of Aunus, a native of the Apennines. "Haud extremus, not the least in cunning and fraud.

705 - 6. •Quid — equo,' what great feat is it, though you are a woman, if you trust to your good steed?fugam,' the power of fight.

108. You will soon find whether your dain boasting will redound to your injury or to mine.

711. purâ parma,' with her bright shield.
714. And spurs on the swift horse with his armed heel.
716. lubricus,' deceitful, perfidi

718 - 9. ignea,' swift as flame: 'frænis — prehensis,' then turning round and seizing the reins of his horse.

721 -2. As easily as the hawk, a sacred bird, flies from a lofty rock after a dove high in the clouds ; sacer,' because omens were drawn from this bird.

725 - 6. 'non nullis Observans oculis,' observing attentirely.

730 – 2. alas'; see note to 604: variis vocibus,' with many reproachful words. 'reficit - pulsos,' and rallies the flying troops to the fight. 50-dolituri,' never sensible of the infamy which you incur.

735. Why do we carry swords and those useless weapons in our hands ?

737. Or when the crooked pipe proclaims the hour for the dance and song in honor of Bacchus.

739. “secundus haruspex,' the soothsayer proclaiming that the omens are favorable.

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; the ancients often speak of the soul of young

iki body with sorrow and indignation, as if angry at a 119 Incurrunt'; Gr. § 205. Rem. 3, and $ 209. Rem. 11.

ulutus Opis,' Opis, the attendant nymph of Diana, whom 1111 sent to avenge the death of Camilla.

amore,' in the shouting crowd : “mullatam,' for ' affectam.' • nimium - Supplicium, too cruel a penalty hast thou suffer.

mtur,' by hypallage, for desertis. . indecorem,' unhonored, because unavenged : 'regina,' Di

teipue — inultæ,' your death shall not be spoken of among the His as an ignoble one, nor shall you bear the ignominy of having died ...ted.

is i bustum '; a tomb consisting of a great mound of earth : 'Re. in Lborcenni Antiqui Laurentis,' of the ancient Laurentian king Der

; nothing is known respecting him. * 32.dea,' Opis: rapido nisu,' by a quick effort of her wings. min-8. diversus,' in a different direction : capias – Præmia,' that Du may receire due punishment for the death of Camilla. "Threïssa'; uius called from her resemblance to the Amazons, who dwelt in Thrace.

860 - 2. And strained it far, until the bent extremities of the bow met together, and her hands being on a level, with her left she held the iron point of the arrow, and with her right on the string she touched her breast.

864. • Audiit unà '; he heard the whistling of the arrow at the same moment that he was struck by it.

866. • Obliti,' forgetful of all but their own safety : 'ignoto in pulve. re,' in a thick cloud of dust, through which objects could not be discerned.

870. desolati,' abandoned by their leaders.
877. 'e speculis, from the elevation of the walls.

882. • Mænibus,' within the city: inter - domorum,' close by the shelter of their homes.

886 - 90. Of the citizens trying to defend the entrance by arms, and of the fugitives rushing upon these arms, in order to get into the city. Thus the Rutuli fight with and slay each other. “Exclusi, Pars,' of those who were excluded, a part, &c. præcipites,' steep, precipitous : I urgente ruina,' the margin of the ditches caving in. immissis postes,' a part blind with frenzy, — 'immissis frænis,' at full speed, rush against the gates and posts strengthened with bars.

891-2. summo certamine,' in this final contest, at this critical time: • Monstrat,' urges them on : Camillam,' the death of Camilla.

894 - 5. Præcipites imitantur ferrum,' hastily supply the place of suords and better weapons by stakes of hard wood : ardent,' eagerly desire : 'pro menibus,' in defending the walls.

896 - 7. Turnum implet,' fills the ears of Turnus, occupies his attention. Set – tumultum,' and Acca brings great perturbation into the mind of the youth.

900 -2. Had occupied all the ground, and the consternation had now spread even into the city. 'sæva - poscunt,' the hostile determination of Jove so ordered it: 'obsessos,' which he had occupied in ambush.

904. galtus apertos,' the pass abandoned by the enemy.

906 - 7. rapidi feruntur, adrance rapidly: 'nec – absunt,' are not distant a great way from each other.

911-3. He heard the tramp of coming feet and the neighing of horses. 'ineant, tentent'; the present for the pluperfect subjunctive. gurgite Ibero,' in the western ocean, beyond the coast of Spain, where the sun appeared to set.

915. .et — vallant,' and surround their camps with intrenchments.

The most poetical passages of this book are the lamentations of Æneas and Evander over the body of Pallas, the fine description of the open741 - 2. moriturus,' prepared to die : "turbidus,' excited, furious.

744..gremium - suunn,' in his own lap; Venulus was pulled off his own horse, and thrown over that of Tarcho.

747 - 8. tum - apertas,' then he breaks off the iron from the tip of his spear, and searches for an exposed parl, - unprotected by armour.

750. et -- exit,' and by great exertion of strength wards off the blow.

752 - 3. implicuit - hæsit,' tuines his feet round the prey, and binds it in his claros. "sinuosa - versat,' twists round in winding folds.

757-9. Tiburtûm'; see note to 519. "eventum,' the success : Mæonidæ'; see notes to Book VIII. 479 and 499. (fatis debitus,' doomed by fate ; see 590 – 3.

760 - 1. He first, with levelled javelin and great skill, rides round the swift Camilla, and seeks the easiest chance of inflicting a wound.

763. Hither Arruns follows her and secretly tracfs her steps.

766 - 8. • Hos — aditus,' now this opening, now that : .certam,' wellaimed. sacer Cybelæ’; devoted by vow to the service of Cybele.

770 – 3. quem — tegebat,' a skin, fastened with gold clasps and decked with brazen scales overlapping each other like a bird's plumage, corered the horse. clarus,' conspicuous by his rich dress : peregrinâ ferrugine'; see Book IX. 582, and note. Shot Cretan arrows from a Lycian bow; see notes to Ecl. VI. 60, and Ecl. X. 59.

775 - 6. tum — auro,' also, he had drawn together, with a clasp of yellow gold, his saffron-colored cloak, and the rustling folds of his fine linen garment. The rich dress of the Trojan priest is thus circumstantially described, to account for the eagerness of Camilla in pursu. ing him. “Etsi virilis animi fæmina, tamen a cultu et ornatu intactam mentem non habuit.Heyne.

779. Or that she might adorn herself with the captured gold.

783-7. tempore capto, having found an opportunity : ex insidiis Concitat Telim,' stealthily aims his weapon. Soractis'; see note to Book VII. 696. There was a celebrated temple of Apollo on this mountain : hence 'sancti.' 'primi,' especially: cui — Pascitur,' for whom a pile of burning pine logs is kept up.

788. We, your worshippers, walk over ihe heap of lire coals; which the priests of Apollo contrived to do without injury, by means of some preparation applied to the soles of the feet.

792. dum,' provided that : meo vulnere,' a wound inflicted by me.

794. 'partem voti'; Apollo allowed him to kill Camilla, but not to return alive to the land of his fathers.

797-8. reducem,'“illum’understood : alta,' renowned: 'in notos,' to the winds, – the species for the genus.

800 – 3. acres,' rendered acute by their anxiety for their queen : neque – sonitas,' nor of the whistling in the air. sub exsertam papillam,' just beneath her uncovered breast.

809- 14. Ac velut ille lupus,' and as a wolf ; 'ille' is expletive : (avius,' straying far away : * caudam – utero,' in his fright, hugging his tail, hides it belucen his legs : "turbidus,' terrified.

815.mediis armis,' in the midst of the armed band. 818- 9. • labuntur — reliquit,' her glazed eyes are set in death, and the former rosy hue leares her countenance.

8:12-5. Quicum - curas,' with whom she was wont to share her anrieties ; .quicum'; Gr. § 136. Rem. 1. Hactenus potui,' thus far my strength has served me : Conficit,' overpowers : 'et-circum,' and every thing grows dark around me; an affecting picture of death. hæc mandata novissima,' this my last message.

828 - 30. • Auens'; finely expressive; sloucly dropping down : "frigi. da,' chilled in death : • Paulatim — se,' gradually fries herself from, is released : “ lenta,' bending powerless : captum,' overpowered, and therefore languishing : posuit, suffered to fall. The exquisite propriety of the Latin words defies all attempt at translation.

831. indignata'; the ancients often speak of the soul of young persons quitting the body with sorrow and indignation, as if angry at a premature death.

834. • densi copia Incurrunt'; Gr. § 205. Rem. 3, and $ 209. Rem. 11. 836. •Triviæ custos Opis,' Opis, the attendant nymph of Diana, whom that goddess had sent to avenge the death of Camilla.

838-9. clamore,' in the shouting crowd: 'multatam,' for 'affectam.'

841 – 3. nimiùm - Supplicium, too cruel a penalty hast thou suffer. ed : deserlæ,' by hy pallage, for • desertis.

845-7. indecorem,' unhonored, because unavenged : regina,' Diana. 'neque — inultæ,' your death shall not be spoken of among the nations as an ignoble one, nor shall you bear the ignominy of having died unavenged.

850. bustum'; a tomb consisting of a great mound of earth : 'Re. gis Dercenni Antiqui Laurentis,' of the ancient Laurentian king Der. cennus ; nothing is known respecting him.

852. .dea,' Opis : rapido nisu,' by a quick effort of her wings.

855 - 8. diversus, in a different direction : capias — Præmia,' that you may receive due punishment for the death of Camilla. "Threïssa'; thus called from her resemblance to the Amazons, who dwelt in Thrace.

860 - 2. And strained it far, until the bent extremities of the bow met together, and her hands being on a level, with her left she held the iron point of the arrow, and with her right on the string she touched her breast.

864. • Audiit unâ '; he heard the whistling of the arrow at the same moment that he was struck by it.

866. • Obliti,' forgetful of all but their own safety : 'ignoto in pulvere,' in a thick cloud of dust, through which objects could not be discerned.

870. desolati,' abandoned by their leaders.
877. 'e speculis,' from the elevation of the walls.

882. • Mænibus,' within the city: "inter -- domorum,' close by the shelter of their homes.

886 - 90. Of the citizens trying to defend the entrance by arms, and of the fugitives rushing upon these arms, in order to get into the city. Thus the Rutuli fight with and slay each other. 'Exclusi, Pars,' of those who were excluded, a part, &c. præcipites,' steep, precipitous : 'urgente ruina,' the margin of the ditches caving in. immissis postes,' a part blind with frenzy, - 'immissis frænis, at full speed, rush against the gates and posts strengthened with bars.

891 - 2 summo certamine,' in this final contest, at this critical time: • Monstrat,' urges them on : Camillam,' the death of Camilla.

894 - 5. Præcipites imitantur ferrum,' hastily supply the place of swords and better weapons by stakes of hard wood : ardent,' eagerly desire : pro menibus,' in defending the walls.

896 - 7. Turnum implet, fills the ears of Turnus, occupies his attention. Set - tumultum,' and Acca brings great perturbation into the mind of the youth.

900 - 2. Had occupied all the ground, and the consternation had now spread even into the city. "sæva — poscunt,' the hostile determination of Jore so ordered it: 'obsessos,' which he had occupied in ambush.

904. galtus apertos,' the pass abandoned by the enemy.

906 - 7. rapidi feruntur, advance rapidly: nec – absunt,' are not distant a great way from each other.

911-3. He heard the tramp of coming feet and the neighing of horses. 'ineant, tentent'; the present for the pluperfect subjunctive. 'gurgite Ibero,' in the western ocean, beyond the coast of Spain, where the sun appeared to set.

915. 'et - vallant,' and surround their camps with intrenchments.

The most poetical passages of this book are the lamentations of Æneas and Evander over the body of Pallas, the fine description of the open

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