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and fertile. It contains 171 families of Indians, and 14 of Spaniards and 3Iustees.

Tetecala, another, in the head settlement of the district of Xoxutla, and of the same alcaldia mayor.

TETELA, Del Voi.can, a jurisdiction and alcaldia mayor of Nueva Espaua. It is one of the most limited and reduced of that kingdom; since its limits do not exceed five leagues from n. to s. and since its whole territory is of mountains and deep ravines totally incapable of cultivation. It is two leagues wide from e. to w. and in its few plains are gathered some scanty crops of maize, lentils, and fruits of the country ; these affording its only branch of trade. For, although they formerly collected large quantities of cochineal, yet has this custom entirely fallen off, from the Indians having lost the nopakras, from which the cochineal was procured; again, although it is known that there are some silvermines in this jurisdiction, yet are they not worked. It was in former times more populous, as well in Spaniards as in Indians, but when its productions began to decline, its inhabitants betook themselves to the neighbouring jurisdictions; and, indeed, those that remain, pay their tribute in the jurisdiction of Coautla Amilpas, and obtain necessaries out of the jurisdiction. Its population consists of only three settlements, which are,

Metepec, Xuchicalco, Hueyapan.

Tetela, the capital, is the settlement of the same name, contains 100 families of Mexican Indians, and 10 of Spaniards, and a convent of Dominicans. Twenty leagues s. e. of Mexico.

Tetela, San Gaspar De, a settlement of the head settlement of the district and alcaldia mayor of Cuernavaca in the same kingdom.

Tetela, another, of the head settlement of Xonocatepec, and of the same alcaldia mayor as the former.

Tetela, another, with the dedicatory title of Santa Maria, in the head settlement of the district of Tlalixcoya, and alcaldia mayor of Mizantla. It contains 52 families of Indians.

Tetela, another, with the surname Del Rio, a head settlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor of Azuchitlan. It was formerly the capital. Its situation is between two lofty mountains, and near it runs the river of Las Balzas, fertilizing its territory by the n. and that of Las Truchas by the w. part; and these unite within a small distance from the town. It contains 80 families of Indians, and seven of Muslees, whose

trade is very small. Fifteen leagues s. e. of its head settlement.

Tetela, another, a real of silver-mines, and a modern town, of the same head settlement and alcaldia mayor as the former. . Tetela, another, also a real of silver-mines, of the alcaldia mayor of Zetela Xonotla. It contains 32 families of Spaniards, 107 of Mulattoes, Mustees, and Negroes, who, at the cost of the miners, have erected a beautiful temple, which is a chapel of ease of the head settlement of the district of Xonotla. In this settlement resides the lieutenant of the alcalde mayor. Its inhabitants are employed in sowing seeds, cutting woods, and making charcoal, and torches for the use of the mine. In this mine there is a vein of gold, but of such base alloy as to render but little profit, so that the mine is worked very little.

Tetela, another jurisdiction and alcaldia mayor, with the addition of Xonotla. It is small and much reduced, and its trade consists in the working of one mine, which, although there be many others, is the only one that is worked. The inhabitants sow maize, French beans, beans, and axonjoli, and of these they gather great crops, as the soil is particularly favourable to their cultivation. The nuts here are also much esteemed in all the provinces, and especially at Mexico, whither there is a great quantity regularly carried. In all this jurisdiction there is no other than one estate called Totonalapa, which is two leagues from the capital, and in which they breed much large and small cattle. This alcaldia is composed of two districts; the one of Tetela and the other of Xonoha; so that it takes the name of both. In the former the population is reduced to three settlements besides the capital, and which are,

San Pedro, San Christoval, San Estevan.

And the second to five, which are,

San Martin, San Andres,

San Francisco, Los Reyes.

Santiago,

Tetela, the capital of them all, which, as we have observed, is of the same name, is of a cold and moist temperature, contains 242 families of Indians, and 40 of Spaniards. Before it runs an abundant stream, which, diffusing its waters through that territory, renders it fertile and delightful; and there are here, in - consequence, many gardens full of flowers, fruits, and pulse. The said river, after surrounding the real of the mines, fertilizes its district. Thirty-six leagues n. of Mexico.

Tetela, another jurisdiction or alcaldia mayor in the same kingdom, with the name of Del Rio. See Azuchitlan.

TETELPA, S. Juan De, a settlement of the head settlement of the district of Mazacatepec, and alcaldia mayor of Cuenavaca in Nueva Espana, on the shore of a river. It contains 34 families of Indians, who cultivate much maize, fruit, and cotton, and is five leagues from its head settlement.

TETELZINCO, a settlement of the head settlement of the district of Chipalzinco, and algaldia mayor of Tixtlan in Nueva Espana; situate between two mountains, near the river of Las Balzas. It contains 80 families of Indians, and is annexed to the curacy of its head settlement, from whence it lies two leagues.

Tetelzinco, another, a head settlement of the district, in the alcaldia mayor of Coautla in the same kingdom. It contains 250 families of Mexican Indians, and, at the distance of threequarters of a league to n. n. w. it has a sugarengine, called San Pedro Martin ; where there is also a sumptuous temple, and many houses, inhabited by 40 families of Spaniards, Mulattoes, and Mustees, and a great number of Gananes Indians; also at another engine called De Calderon, are 13 families of Mulattoes. This settlement is one league n. of its capital.

TETEPAM, a settlement of the head settlement of the district of Tuscacuezco, and alcaldia mayor of Amola in the same kingdom as the former. It contains 70 families of Indians, and is 1-j leagues from its head settlement.

TETEPANGO, Huipuxtla, a jurisdiction and alcaldia mayor of Nueva Espaiia. It is much reduced, and, in consequence, there have been added to it the districts of Huipuxtla and Mizquiahuala. It is very scarce of water, and the natives cultivate nothing but some wheat and maize with labour, dedicating themselves rather to the fattening of swine, in which consist their principal trade; and, although in the gardens they gather some fruits, yet, as from the distance, they cannot carry them to Mexico, they are of little profit.

It is computed that this district contains 1000 families of Indians, who, for the most part, live in the cultivated estates and in the ranchos, where there are also 100 other families of Spaniards, Mustees, and Mulattoes. The capital is the settlement of Huipuxtla, and is the residence of the corregidor; and the others are as follows:

Tetepango, S. Nicolas de Yete

Axacuba, comatl,

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Tetepango, another settlement of the jurisdiction and alcaldia mayor of Tlaxcala, in the bishopric of La Puebla de los Angles and kingdom of Nueva Espana.

TETEPELZIN, a settlement of the head settlement of the district and alcaldia mayor of Xicayan. It is of a hot temperature, and contains 24 families of Indians.

[TETEROA Harbour, on the w. side of the island of Ulietea, one of the Society Islands. Lat. 16°51's. Long. 151° 27'a?.]

[TETHUROA, an island in the S. Pacific Ocean, about 24 miles from Point Venus in the island of Otaheite. Lat. 17° 4's. Long. 149° 30'«.]

TETIPAC, a head settlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor of Chichicapa, in the province and bishopric of Oaxaca and kingdom of Nueva Espana. It contains 870 families of Indians, including those of its wards; and all are employed in the cultivation and trade of cochineal and seeds.

TETLA, San Juan De, a settlement of the head settlement of the district and alcaldia mayor of Guejozinco in Nueva Espana. It contains 22 families of Indians.

Tetla, another settlement, with the same dedicatory title, of the missions held by the religious of S. Francisco, in the alcaldia mayor of S. Luis de Potosi.

TETLAMA, San Agustin De, a settlement of the head settlement of the district of Huitepec, and alcaldia mayor of Cuernavaca in Nueva Espana. It contains 25 families of Indians.

Tetlama, another, with the dedicatory title of Santa Ana, in the head settlement of the district of Pinzandaro, and alcaldia mayor of Tanzitaro. It is of a hot temperature, contains 40 families of Indians, and is seven leagues w. of its head settlement.

TETON, a settlement of the province and government of Cartagena, in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada; on the shore of the Grande de la Magdalena.;

[TETZEUCO, a brackish lake in Mexico. See Mexico.]

TEVANONDADON, a settlement of Indians of the province of Pennsylvania in the United States, on the confines of New York, and at the e. head of the river Susquehannah.

TEUCHITAN, a settlement of the head settlement of the district and alcaldia mayor of Tala in Nueva Espaiia.

TEVERTON, a settlement of New England, in the United States, on the e. coast of Bristol.

TEULTEPEC, a settlement of the province and alcaldia mayor of Chiapa in the kingdom of Guatemala.

[TEUSHANUSHSONG-GOGHTA, an Indian village on the a. bank of Alleghany River in Pennsylvania. Five miles n. of the 5. line of the State, and M as. e. of Chatoughque Lake.]

TEUTALPAN, San Andres De, a head settlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor of Zacatlan in Nueva Espafia. It contains 445 families of Indians, including those of the settlements of its district.

TEUTILA, a jurisdiction and alcaldia mayor, in the province and bishopric of Oaxaca and kingdom of Nueva Espafia. It consists of 13 settlements, head settlement of the district, is for the most part barren, and produces nothing but maize.

Teutila, the capital, of the same name, enjoys a mild temperature, and contains 164 families of Mazatecos Indians, and is 29 leagues e.s.e. of Mexico.

The other settlements are,

Tlacomaltepec, Guaxospan,

Ixcath'in, Quetzalapan,

Tlaquazintepec, Santiago Tecoutla,

Zoyaltepec, S. Lucas Oxitlan,

Tenango, S. Felipe Xalapa,

Avautla, Tepetotutla.

TEUTITLAN, Del Valle, a jurisdiction and alcaldia mayor of Nueva Espafia, in the province and bishopric of Oaxaca. It is very fertile in wheat, maize, and French bean*.

Teutitlan, the capital, is of its name, of a mild temperature, contains a convent of Dominicans, and 237 families of Indians, who live by trading in cochineal and seeds, which they grow in the ranchos in its district. It has also seven estates, and a sugar-engine, at which assist some families of Spaniards and Mustees. [One hundred and ninety-nine miles s. e. of Mexico, in lat. 17° 2' n. long. 90° 30' a;.] The other settlements are,

Tlacolula, S. Miguel,

Mitla, S. Francisco,

S. Miguel de Abar- Santa Catalina,

radas, Santa Maria Zapo

Santo Domingo, titlan,

S. Lorenzo, Santa Ana,

Santiago Huizitlal- S. Luis,

tepee, Quiatoni,

Mazatlan, Sta. Ana del Valle,

Santo Tomas, Macuilzuchil,

Santo Domingo, Xilotepec,

S. Juan, S. Juan Guelavia.

TEUTLA, a settlement of the alcaldia mayor of Teotalco in Nueva Espafia. It contains 15 families of Indians, and is annexed to the curacy ofXolalpan.

TEUTLAN, a settlement of the head settlement of the district of Tuzcacuezco, and alcaldia mayor of Amola in Nueva Espaiia. It is very small, and lies three leagues w. of Xiquilpa.

TEUSACA, a city of the province of Bogota, and of the nation of the Moscas Indians, of the Nuevo Rev no de Granada. It was gained by Gonzalo Ximencz de Quesada in 1538, and was afterwards destroyed, nothing of it remaining at the present day but a miserable village of Indians.

TEUZITLAN, a jurisdiction and alcaldia mayor of Nueva Espafia. It is of small extent and moderate commerce; produces wax, pitch, maize, French beans, and some fruits, sufficient scantily to provide for the wants of the inhabitants. It has 18 mills or engines, where these make nothing but brown and white sugar, and these articles, with some breeds of large cattle, constitute its commerce.

The jurisdiction is composed of six settlements, which are,

Chiautla, S. Juan Zimpaco,

Atempa, S. Sebastian Petatlan,

Atoluca, and the capital, of the same name, inhabited by 303 families of Mexican Indians, 102 of Spaniards, 1C3 of Mustees, and 65 of Mulattoes. Forty leagues e. n. c. of Mexico.

TEVKjUARI, a river of the province and captainship of Brazil. It rises near the coast, runs many leagues to w. and turning its course to s. enters the sea.

TEWKSBURY, a town of the province of Massachusetts; one of those composing New England, in the United States; situate on the shore of the river Pennycook.

TEXAS, or Nuevas Filipinas, a province and government of N. America, and one of the greatest extent; bounded s. e. by the Bay of Mexico, e. and n. e. by Louisiana. It begins at the river of Medina, the boundary between it and the province of Coaguila. Its extent is more than 220 leagues to n. n. e. and it is more than GO in width; and in all this vast extent it has not more than four settlements, very distant from each other.

This country can vie with the richest and most fertile countries of Europe, produces in abundance maize, French beans, much cattle, large and small, and in its woods are Mexican bulls, deer, bears, wild boars, partridges,turkeys, hares, rabbits, and a great variety of other birds and animals. It is fertilized by various rivers, which are so stocked with fish that they may be caught with the greatest ease. The most considerable rivers are the San Antonio, the shores of which are covered with elms and fruit trees, especially with plums and blackberries; that of Los Inocentes, that of Guadalupe, and those of Las Animas de Arriba and De Abaxo, and that of Colorado; also that of Los Brazos de Dios, and that of La Santisima Trinadad; and, besides these, there are several streams, which, in other parts, would pass for rivers; and which are named Del Leon, Salado, Cibolo, San Miguel, San Rafael, Garrapatas, Nuncio, Corpus Christi, Navasoto, San Juan, Santa Efegenia, and Santa Coleta. It has also a large lake of sweet water, called Santa Ana.

In its mountains grow medlars, chesnuts like those of Europe, all kinds of walnuts; and vines, which, without being planted, spring up voluntarily, and entwine themselves in the branches of the trees, forming a delightful and luxuriant prospect; not but that the other vegetable productions do, in the like manner, yield their fruits without cultivation. This extensive country is inhabited by infinite nations of Indians, now pacified. ,

The capital is the town and garrison of San Antonio de Bejar. The other settlements are, Nuestro Senora del Pilar de los Adaes, Nuestra Senora de los Dolores, La Bahia del Espiritu Santo, And the town of San Fernando.

Texas, a small settlement of Indians, of the same province and government.

TEXCALA, San Francisco De, a settlement of the head settlement of the district of Xacapistla, and alcaldia mayor of Cuernavaca in Nueva Espaiia.

TEXCALICAQUE, San Mateo De, a head settlement of the district of Metepec in Nueva fispana: containing 358 families of Indians.

TEXHUACAN, S. Miguel De, a settlement of the head settlement of the district of Chacaltianguis, and alcaldia mayor of Cozamaloapan in Nueva Espaiia, on the banks of a river which

flows down from the sierra of Villalta, and runs to unite itself with the Alvarado, a league before you come to the settlement of Amatlan.

It is of a hot temperature, and its population is composed of three families of Spaniards, five of Mustees, and 87 of Mulattoes and Negroes. It was formerly inhabited by many Indians, but there are none of these now remaining, owing to the little union existing between them and the Mulattoes and Negroes. The trade of this place consists in the barter of cotton for cochineal with the jurisdiction of Villalta. Eight leagues e. of its head settlement.

TEXMELUCAN, S. Salvador De, a head settlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor of Guejozinco; containing 60 families of Indians.

Texmelucan, S. Martin De, a settlement of the same head settlement and alcaldia mayor as the former. It contains 150 families of Spaniards, Mustees, and Mulattoes, and 94 of Indians, and a convent of the barefooted order of St. Francis, ay. of its head settlement. In its district are 56 cultivated estates, which produce annually abundant crops of wheat and other seeds.

Texmelucan, Santa Maria De, a settlement in the head settlement of San Salvador, and of the same alcaldia mayor as the former, and containing 91 Indian families.

TEXOCOMULCO, a head settlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor of Teozacoalco in Nueva Espaiia. It contains 150 families of Indians, and some of Mustees and Mulattoes; is of a moist temperature, and its inhabitants maintain themselves by the cultivation and trade of cochineal. Although they formerly worked some silver-mines here, they are now abandoned.

TEXOCOTLA, a settlement of the head settlement of the district of Atlistac, and alcaldia mayor of Tlapa in Nueva Espaiia; containing 24 families of Indians.

TEXPAN, S. Miguel De, a settlement of the head settlement of the district of Texpexpan, and alcaldia mayor of Teotihuacan. It contains only six families of Indians, and seven of Mustees, who maintain themselves by making pulque, and by cultivating some seeds. It is of a cold temperature.

TEXTIPAC, a head settlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor of Tasco in Nueva Espaiia. It contains 65 families of Indians, and is four leagues n. one quarter n. w. of its capital.

TEXUPA, a head settlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor of Tepozcolula, in the province and bishopric of Oaxaca and kingdom of Nueva Espafia. It is of a mild temperature, contains a convent of Dominicans, 192 families of Indians, some of Spaniards, Mustees, and Mulattoes, who are given to agriculture and to the cultivation of cochineal. The country of its district is very fertile, pleasant, and abounding in fruit. Five leagues w. by n. of its capital.

TEXUPILCO, San Pedro De, a settlement of the head settlement of the district of San Francisco del Valle, and alcaldia mayor of Zultepec in Nueva Espafia. It contains 12 families of Spaniards and Mustees, and 42 of Indians; is surrounded by various ranchos which are Campuzano, with 12 families of Spaniards and Mustees; S. Juan, with four; Aguirre, with eight; Lopez, with four; Pinzon, with five; all those of the Spaniards being dedicated to the sowing of wheat, maize, and French beans. Seven leagues s. of the capital.

TEXUTEPEC, a settlement of the alcaldia mayor of Nochistlan in Nueva Espafia. It is very small, and has only 15 families of Indians.

TEYAOGEN, a small river of the province of Pennsylvania in the United States. It runs s. e. and enters the source of the e. arm of the Susquehannah.

TEYUPA, a small river of the province and government of Paraguay, which runs to s. s. w. and enters the Yaquini.

TEZAHUAPA, a head settlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor of Zempoala in Nueva Espana. It contains 25 families of Indians.

TEZAYUCA, a settlement of the jurisdiction and alcaldia mayor of Pachuca in Nueva Espana. It contains 80 families of Indians.

TEZCOCO, or Tezcuco, a jurisdiction and alcaldia mayor of Nueva Espana. It is of small extent, bounded by the corrcgimietito of Mexico; but is very populous, fertile, and abounding in wheat, maize, seeds, and garden herbs. It also produces many woods, which they carry in canoes to Mexico by the lake; nor do they want manufactories, where they make no small quantity of serges and other stuffs from the wool of the cattle which is found here in tolerable numbers. Here are also breeds of swine, and with these, besides some salt, does this jurisdiction carry on a fair trade with the capital and the neighbouring jurisdictions. It enjoys a benign and mild temperature, but is scantily supplied with water for irrigation. Its population consists of 16 principal settlements or head settlements of the district, and of many smaller.

Tezcoco, the capital, is the city of the same name, which, through corruption, they call com

monly Tezcuco. It was in the time of the gentilism of the Indians, one of the most populous and celebrated; governed by many kings of various nations, especially of the Chichimecan. It was here that the king S'azahualcoyot, so famous as well for valour as for government, maintained his sovereignty; and, after the establishment of the Mexican empire, it was the court of the princes of the race of Moctezuma, and was, consequently, a place of great magnificence. It was also the military school, wherein was taught the management of arms, and the characters in which their histories were written, and which were similar to the hieroglyphics used by the Egyptians. In these they handed down to posterity the rites and ceremonies of their false religion, and they had a method of forming their calendars so exact as to keep the nicest account of the years, of the movements of the stars, and of the increase and wane of the moon; and thus did they, without the knowledge of a single letter, clearly explain, by figures of men and animals, whatsoever they wished to transmit to memory.

At the time of the conquest by the Spaniards, when Cortes drew near to this city, Moctezuma assembled in it all his augurs and necromancers, to consult them; and in it the same Hernan Cortes afterwards held his garrison, and built some brigantines, making all the other necessary arrangements for the siege of Mexico. At present this beautiful town is nearly destroyed, from the want of trade; although it still has some magnificent buildings, in memory of what it was. Its streets are very wide and handsome, and is the first city wherein the Spanish government was established in that kingdom.

It has a very fine convent of Franciscans, and another of San Juan de Dios, which is an hospital: it is inhabited by 1250 families of Indians, and 150 of Spaniards, Mulattoes, and Mustees. At half a league's distance from it is the holy sanctuary of Nuestra Senora de Tulantongo, which is the chapel of ease to the city : -in the same is a beautiful picture on a tablet of three quarters of a yard long, and of two-thirds wide. There is a tradition that this picture, having been damaged in the house of a certain Indian, was conveyed to a blind Indian, a neighbour, in order that he might pray before it, to be released from his infirmity; and that whilst he was praying, he heard a voice, telling him to wash his eyes with the water of the well which is in the church; that he immediately did so, and recovered his sight, whilst the image presented itself to his view in a perfect state. The whole of the city

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