Page images
PDF
EPUB

and I believe thy reward in the end will fall out like mine. .Vas. So perhaps too.

Hip. Resolves thyself it will. Had I one so true, so truly honest, so secret to my counsels, as thou hast been to him and his, I should think it a slight acquittance, not only to make him master of all I have, but even of myself.

Vas. O you are a noble gentlewoman!

Hip. Wilt thou feed always upon hopes ? well, I know thou art wise, and seest the reward of an old servant daily, what it is.

Vas. Beggary and neglect.

Hip. True; but, Vasques, wert thou mine, and would'st be private to me and my designs, I here protest, myself, and all what I can else call mine, should be at thy dispose.

Vas. Work you that way, old mole? then I have the wind of you—[Aside.]—I were not worthy of it by any desert that could lie—within my compass; if I could

Hip. What then?

Vas. I should then hope to live in these my old years with rest and security. Hip. Give me thy hand: now promise but thy

silence, And help to bring to pass a plot I have; And here, in sight of Heaven, that being done, I make thee lord of me and mine estate.

5 Resolve thyself it will.] i. e. assure, convince thyself. The word occurs just below in the same sense.

Milling on the nuncio of the pope

resides in Parma ; by which ther: Hr Meyes to get the love of Annabella.

Erica GRIMALDI. - Sipon, sir.

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]
[graphic]

Grim. Soranzo! what, mine enemy?" is it he?
Rich. Is he your enemy?
Grim. The man I hate
Worse than confusion; I will tell him straight.-

Rich. Nay, then take my advice,
Even for his grace's sake the cardinal;
I'll find a time when he and she do meet,
Of which I'll give you notice; and, to be sure
He shall not scape you, I'll provide a poison
To dip your rapier's point in; if he had
As many heads as Hydra had, he dies.
- Grim. But shall I trust thee, doctor?

Rich. As yourself;
Doubt not in aught.—[Exit Grim.]—Thus shall

the fates decree, By me Soranzo falls, that ruin'd me. [Exeunt.

SCENE IV.

Another Part of the Street. Enter Donado, with a Letter, BERGETTO, and

Poggio. Don. Well, sir, I must be content to be both ur secretary and your messenger myself. I inot tell what this letter may work; but, as

Grim. Soranzo! what, mine enemy?] It is strange that this d appear a new discovery to Grimaldi, when he had been fully ized of it in the rencontre with Vasques in the first act. It is often, however, that Ford thus wholly forgets himself. Ip the line there is apparently some slight error: “I'll tell him zht,” should probably be, “I'll to him straight." ; - that ruin'd me.] The old copy reads" that

Vas. Come, you are merry; this is such a happiness that I can neither think or believe

Hip. Promise thy secrecy, and 'tis confirm’d. · Vas. Then here I call our good genii for witnesses, whatsoever your designs are, or against whomsoever, I will not only be a special actor therein, but never disclose it till it be effected.

Hip. I take thy word, and, with that, thee for

• mine; . Come then, let's more confer of this anon.On this delicious bane my thought shall banquet, Revenge shall sweeten what my griefs have tasted.

[Aside, and exit with Vas.

SCENE III.

The Street.
Enter RICHARDETTO and Philotis.
Rich. Thou seest, my lovely niece, these strange

mishaps,
How all my fortunes turn to my disgrace;
Wherein I am but as a looker-on,
Whilst others act my shame, and I am silent.
Phi. But, uncle, wherein can this borrow'd

shape Give you content ?

Rich. I'll tell thee, gentle niece:
Thy wanton aunt in her lascivious riots
Lives now secure, thinks I am surely dead,
In my late journey to Ligorne for you;

As I have caus'd it to be rumour'd out.
Now would I see with what an impudence
She gives scope to her loose adultery,
And how the common voice allows hereof;
Thus far I have prevail'd.

Phi. Alas, I fear
You mean some strange revenge.

Rich. O be not troubled,
Your ignorance shall plead for you in all-
But to our business.- What! you learn'd for cer-

tain, How Signior Florio means to give his daughter In marriage to Soranzo ?

Phi. Yes, for certain.

Rich. But how find you young Annabella's love Inclined to him?

Phi. For aught I could perceive, She neither fancies him or any else. Rich. There's mystery in that, which time must

shew.
She us’d you kindly?

Phi. Yes.
Rich. And crav'd your company ?
Phi. Often.

Rich. 'Tis well; it goes as I could wish.
I am the doctor now, and as for you,
None knows you; if all fail not, we shall thrive.
But who comes here?-I know him; 'tis Gri-

maldi, A Roman and a soldier, near allied Unto the Duke of Montferrato, one

M

« PreviousContinue »