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Of virtues with which very few are blest?
While underneath this rude, uncouth disguise
A genius of extensive knowledge lies.

A NEGLECTED FIELD.
Sat. i. 3. 36.

Namque
Neglectis urenda filix innascitur agris.

For an uncultured field
Shall for its fire its thorns and thistles yield.

WE MISREPRESENT THE VIRTUES OF OUR FRIENDS.

Sat. i. 3. 54.
Hæc res et jungit, junctos et servat amicos.
At nos virtutes ipsas invertimus, atque
Sincerum cupimus vas incrustare.
Thus shall we gain new friends and keep the old.
But we distort their virtue to a crime,
And joy th’untainted vessel to begrime.
ALL LOADED WITH FAULTS.

Sat. i. 3. 67.
Quam temere in nosmet legem sancimus iniquam !
Nam vitiis nemo sine nascitur : optimus ille est,
Qui minimis urgetur.

Alas ! what laws of how severe a strain,
Against ourselves we thoughtlessly ordain!
For we have all our vices, and the best
Is he who with the fewest is opprest.

FORGIVE OUR DEBTORS AS WE WISH OUR DEBTS TO BE

FORGIVEN.
Sat. i. 3. 74.

Æquum est,
Peccatis veniam poscentem reddere rursus.
It is only right that he who asks forgiveness for his offences,
should be prepared to grant it to others.

SOCIAL GOOD.
Sat. i. 3. 91.

Sensus moresque repugnant,
Atque ipsa utilitas, justi prope mater et æqui.

Sense, custom, social good, from whence arise
All forms of right and wrong, the fact denies.

TAE POETASTER.

Sat. i. 4. 12.

Piger scribendi ferre laborem ;
Scribendi recte: nam, ut multum, nil moror.

He prattled rhymes; but lazy and unfit
For writing well; for much, I own, he writ.

THE WIT SPARES NOT HIS FRIEND.

Sat. i. 4. 33.
Fænum habet in cornu ; longe fuge : dummodo risum
Excutiat sibi, non hic cuiquam parcet amico:
Et, quodcunque semel chartis illeverit, omnes
Gestiet a furno redeuntes scire lacuque,
Et pueros et anus.

“Yonder he drives-avoid that furious beast;
If he may have his jest, he never cares
At whose expense, nor his best friend he spares;
And if he once, in his malignant vein,
The cruel paper with invectives stain,
The slaves, who carry water through the street,
To his charm'd ear his verses must repeat.”

THE POET.
Sat. i. 4. 40.

Neque, si quis scribat, uti nos, Sermoni propiora, putes hunc esse poetam. Ingenium cui sit, cui mens divinior, atque os Magna sonaturum, des nominis hujus honorem.

Is there a man, whom real genius fires,
Whom the diviner soul of verse inspires;
Who talks true greatness ; let him boldly claim
The sacred honours of a poet's name.

THE POET. .

Sat. i. 4. 62.
Invenias etiam disjecti membra poetæ.

The scatter'd poet's limbs it shows.

THE SLANDERER.

Sat. i. 4. 81.

Absentem qui rodit amicum ;
Qui non defendit, alio culpante ; solutos
Qui captat risus hominum, famamque dicacis ;
Fingere qui non visa potest; commissa tacere
Qui nequit; hic niger est : hunc tu, Romane, caveto.

He, who malignant tears an absent friend,
Or, when attack'd by others, don't defend;
Who trivial bursts of laughter strives to raise,
And courts of prating petulance the praise ;
Of things he never saw who tells his tale,
And friendship's secrets knows not to conceal,-
This man is vile: here, Roman, fix your mark;
His soul is black, as his complexion's dark.

FOOLISH JESTING.

Sat. i. 4. 91.

Ego, si risi, quod ineptus
Pastillos Rufillus olet, Gorgonius hircum,
Lividus ac mordax videor tibi ?

But if in idle raillery I said,
Rufillus with perfumes distracts my head,
While foul Gorgonius breathes a ranker air,
You think me most envenom'd and severe.

THE ESSENCE OF MALIGNITY.

Sat. i. 4. 100.
Hic nigræ succus loliginis, hæc est
Ærugo mera.
Such rancour this, of such a poisonous vein,
As never, never, shall my paper stain ;
Much less infect my heart, if I may dare
For my own heart, in anything, to swear.

WOES OF ANOTHER.

Sat. i. 4. 126.

Avidos vicinum funus ut ægros Exanimat, mortisque metu sibi parcere cogit ; Sic teneros animos aliena opprobria sæpe Absterrent vitiis.

A neighbour's funeral, with dire affright,
Checks the rich man's intemperate appetite;
So is the shame of others oft imprest
With wholesome terrors on the youthful breast.

ENOUGH, AND MORE THAN ENOUGH.

Sat. i. 5. 12.

Ohe!
Jam satis est.
“Enough, you scoundrel.”

THE GENTLEMAN.
Sat. i. 5. 32.

Ad unguem Factus homo, Antoni, non ut magis alter, amicus.

A man of worth approved,
And no man more by Antony beloved.

THE PERFECT MAN.

Sat. i. 5. 41.

Quales neque candidiores Terra tulit, neque quis me sit devinctior alter.

Pure spirits these; the world no purer knows;
For none my heart with more affection glows.

A PLEASANT FRIEND.

Sat. i. 5. 44.
Nil ego contulerim jucundo sanus amico.

For sure no blessing in the power of fate
Can be compared, in sanity of mind,
To friends of such companionable kind.
TELL THAT TO THE MARINES.

Sat. i. 5. 100.

Credat Judæus Apella.
The sons of circumcision may receive
The wondrous tale, which I shall ne'er believe.

THE FOLLY OF THE MOB.
Sat. i. 6. 14.

Notante
Judice, quo nosti, populo; qui stultus honores

H

Sæpe dat indignis, et famæ servit ineptus ;
Qui stupet in titulis et imaginibus. Quid oportet
Nos facere, a vulgo longe longeque remotos ?

The people, who, you know, bestow the prize
To men most worthless, and, like slaves to fame,
With foolish reverence hail a titled name,
And, rapt, with awe-struck admiration gaze,
When the long race its images displays.
But how shall we, who differ far and wide
From the mere vulgar, this great point decide ?

FAME.

Sat. i. 6. 23.
Sed fulgente trahit constrictos Gloria curru
Non minus ignotos generosis.
Chain'd to her beamy car, Fame drags along
The mean, the great, an undistinguish'd throng.

ALL MUST LABOUR.
Sat, i. 9. 60.

Nil sine magno
Vita labore dedit mortalibus.

There's nothing gotten in this life
Without a world of toil and strife !

APOLLO SAVED ME.

Sat. i. 9. 78.
Sic me servavit Apollo.
And thus, amidst the noise and rabble,
Apollo saved me in the squabble.

POWER OF RIDICULE.
Sat. i. 10. 14.

Ridiculum acri
Fortius et melius magnas plerumque secat res.

For ridicule shall frequently prevail,
And cut the knot, when graver reasons fail.

BLOCKHEADS.

Sat. i. 10. 20.
O seri studiorum! quine putetis

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