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May none of you, my friends, ever be ashamed of, or negleEt the great salvation! but by a rational faith, that works by love, may you adorn the doctrine of God our saviour in all things! is the devout wish, and earnest prayer, of,

Your devoted,

humble Servant,

Hoxton-square, London, Jan. 10th, 1749.

C. FLEMING.

Page
47
ib. -
69 -
104

ERRATA,
Line
- 12. for thine, r. thy.
13. for a period, put a semicolon.

4. after it, put Vol. II. p. 88.
en 34. and 35. for their honesty, r. the honesty of the

Apostles.
4. for with, r. without,
25. for nor, f. 101.

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May none of you, my friends, ever be ashamed of, or negleet the great salvation! but by a rational faith, that works by love, may you adorn the doetrine of God our saviour in all things! is the devout wish, and earnest prayer, of,

Your devoted,

humble Servant,

Hoxton-Square, London, Jan. ioth, 1749.

C. FLEMING.

ERRATA, Page Line 47 - 12. for thine, r. thy. ib. - 13. for a period, put a semicolon. 69 - 4. after it, put Vol. II. p. 88. 104 eur 34. and 35. for their honesty, r. the honesty of the

Apostles. 115 - 4. for with, r. without, 124 - 25. for nor, f. 101,

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To demonstrate
The truth and certainty of a particular

providence.
T HÉ providence of God, in its general

idea, supposeth his government of the t world, by giving laws to the various diftinct parts of it; laws suitable to their different natures, and by which the conftitution of the whole is preserved.

This general providence consists of various laws or methods of the divine conduct, by which all the constituent parts are governed : or the general, is made up of particulars. e. g. there is one kind of law, that matter, the most inert and passive is put under ; such as the stratas of earth, and the layers of minerals, &c. another to herbs, vegetables, plants and trees: another to brute 2nimals; of these again there is great variety, as they are the inhabitants of the air, land, or water. And other laws yet, respecting creatures endued with reason and freedom.

These laws, I understand, to import active impressions of Deity that produce the several phenomena in the regular succession. Which active impressions are as necessary in one, as in another moment of existence, to the preservation of the present conftitution. For what can law, intendmg the mere simple volition of a Being, fignify to senseless, unintelligent matter? The idea of God's bidding this earth turn upon her axis dai

ly,

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