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LESSON.

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37. Old Ironsides.

0. W. HOLMES. 128

38. That Silent Moon.

G. W. Doaxe. 129

39. Evening on the St. Lawrence.

PROP. SILLIMAN. 130

40. America to England.

W. ALLSTON. 131

41. The American Eagle.

C. W. THOMSON. 133

42. The Last Evening before Eternity. .

J. A. HILLHOUSE. 135

43. Character of Jesus.

S. C. THACHER. 136

44. Woman..

Miss C. E. BEECHER. 133

45. The Treadmill Song.

0. W. HOLMES. 140

46. Darkness.

· Byron. 141

47. God.

Derzhavin. 143

48. Niagara. .

MRS. SIGOURNEY. 146

49. The United States.

G. BANCROFT. 147

50. Wouter Van Twiller.

WASHINGTON IRVING. 149

51. Invocation of Mirth.

Millon. 151

52. Marco Bozzaris.

F. G. HALLECK. 152

53. Waterloo.

Byron. 154

54. Prussian Batlle Hymn.

Körner, 156

55. Bernardo del Carpio.

Mrs. Hemans. 159

56. William Kiest.

WASHINGTON IRVING. 160

57. Palmyra.

WILLIAM WARE. 161

58. Beauties of Nature.

SAMUEL G. Howe. 162

59. An Interesting Adventure.

WILLIAM J. SNELLING, 163

60. Thoughts on Politeness.

GEO. S. HILLARD. 166

61. Same Subject concluded.

ID.

167

62. Cottage on the Swiss Alps.

BUCKMINSTER. 168

63. Peter Stuyvesant

WASHINGTON IRVING. 169

64. Ode on Art.

CHARLES SPRAGUE. 171

65. Robert Burng.

. F. G. HALLECK. 172

66. The Future Life.

W. C. BRYANT. 174

67. The Spirit of Poetry.

H. W. LONGFELLOW. 175

68. The Soldier's Widow.

N. P. WILLIS. 176

69. The Sicilian Vespers.

j. G. WHITTIER. 177

70. Mexican Mythology.

WM. H. PRESCOTT. 178

71. Origin and Progress of Language.

SAMUEL G. HOWE. 180

72. Zenobia's Ambition.

WILLIAM WARE, 181

73. Trials of the Post and ihe Scholar.

Geo, S. HILLARD. 183

74. The Yankees.

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SAMUEL KETTEL. 184

75. Custom of Whitewashing.

FRANCIS HOPKINSON. 185

76. Same Subject continued.

ID.

187

77. Same Subject concluded.

188

78. The Force of Curiosity.

CHARLES SPRAGUE, 191

79. The Winds.

W. C. BRYANT. 193

80. Daybreak.

Richard H. DANA, SEN. 194

81. The Light of Home.

MRS. S. J. HALE. 196

82. A Psalm of Life.

H. W. LONGFELLOW. 197

83. To the Condor.

E. F. ELLET. 193

84. A Child carried away by an Eagle.

Professor Wilson. 199

85. Same Subject concluded.

Id. 201

86. Scene at the Dedication of a Heathen Temple.

WILLIAM WARE, 204

87. Same Subject continued.

ID.

205

88. Same Subject concluded.

ID.

206

89. Hamilton and Jay.

DR. HAWKS. 207

90. Adams and Jefferson.

DANIEL WEBSTER. 209

91. The Destiny of our Republic.

G. S. HILLARD. 211

92. Posthumous Influence of the Wise and Good.

ANDREWS NORTON. 212

93. Look Aloft.

.J. LAWRENCE, Jr. 213

94. Ode on War..

WM. H. BURLEIGH. 214

95. The Last Days of Autumn.

HENRY PICKERING. 215

96. Man.

N. Y. EVENING POST. 216

97. Passage down the Ohio..

JAMES K. PAULDING. 217

98. Spirit of Beauty. .

RUFUS DAWES, 213

99. Education of Females.

JOSEPH STORY. 219

100. The Voices of the Dead.

ORVILLE DEWEY. 221

101. The Jewish Revelation. .

DR. NOYES. 221

102. Incitements to American Intellect.

G. S. HILLARD, 222

103. Importance of Knowledge to the Mechanic.

G. B. EMERSON. 224

104. Macer preaching on the steps of the Capitol at Rome.

WILLIAM WARE. 226

105. Death a sublime and universal Moralist.

JARED SPARKS. 228

106. Reform in Morals.

DR BEECHER. 229

ID.

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107. The Child of the Tomb.

WM. B. TAPPAN. 230

108. Love and Fame.

H. T. TUCKERMAN. 232

109. Lamentation of Rebecca ihe jewess.

G. LUNT. 234

110. Two Hundred Years Ago.

GRENVILLE MELLEN. 235

111. The Stage.

CHARLES SPRAGUE. 237

112. The Burial-Place ai Laurel Hil.

W. G. CLARK. 233

113. The Good Wife.

GEORGE W. BURNAP. 239

114. A Good Daughter.

J. G. PALFREY. 240

115. Religion the Guardian of the Soul.

ORVILLE DEWEY. 241

116. Featvres of American Scenery.

WM. TUDOR. 242

117. Study of Human Nature essential to a Teacher.

G. B. EMERSON. 243

118. Education.

DR. HUMPHREY. 215

119. Progress of Science.

EDWARD EVERETT. 246

120. Purpose of the Bunker-Hill Mionumeni.

DANIEL WEBSTER. 247

121. The American Flag.

J. R. DRAKE. 248

122. Greece in 1820.

J. G. BROOKS. 250

123. The Wild Boy..

CHARLES West THOMSON. 262

124. The Cure of Melancholy.

CARLOS Wilcox. 253

125. My Native Village.

JOHN H. BRYANT. 254

126. The Press.

JOSEPH T. BUCKINGHAM. 255

127. Mount Auburn.

NEHEMIAH ADAMS. 256

128. Trying to Please.

EDWARD T. CHANNING. 257

129. Defence of Charles Greenleaf.

G. S. HILLARD. 258

130. The Genius of Aristophanes.

C. C. FELTON. 259

131. Responsibility of Americans.

E. S. GANNETT. 261

132. The Mocking.Bird.

ALEXANDER WILSON. 262

133. The European and the American Nations.

. DANIEL WEBSTER. 263

134. The Times, the Manners, and the Men.

J. R. LOWELL. 265

135. Liberty to Athens.

JAMES G. PERCIVAL. 266

136. The Arsenal at Springfield.

H. W. LONGFELLOW. 267

137. Immortality.

RICHARD H. DANA, Sen. 263

133. The Gray oid Man of the Mountain.

HARRY HIBBARD. 270

139. The Novel Reader..

CHARLES SPRAGUE. 271

140. Mountains of New Hampshire.

Isaac HILL. 271

141. Local Associations.

HARRISON GRAY Oris. 274

142. The Representative. .

Anonymous. 275

143. A Republican School-Room.

A. B. MUZZEY. 279

144. The English Skylark.

SAMUEL H. STEARNS. 230

145. The Invalid and the Politician.

Murphy. 292

146. New England Freedom and Enterprise.

Josiah QUINCY. 284

147. Freedom and Progress.

CHARLES G. Atherton. 235

148. Scene from Marino Faliero.

Byron. 287

149. The Rich Man's Son, and the Poor Man's Son.

J. R. Lowell. 290

150. New England's Dead.

Isaac M'LELLAN,

JR. 291

151. The Graves of the Patriots.

J. G. PERCIVAL. 293

152. Truth.

H. W. LONGFELLOW. 294

153. The First Sellers in New Hampshire.

N. A. HAVEN. 295

154. Scrooge and Marley.

Charles Dickens, 298

155. The Pilgrim Fathers of New England. .

RUFUS CHOATE. 300

156. The Settlers of Connecticut.

CHAN. KENT. 302

157. Benefits of Collegiate Education.

JOHN SERGEANT. 303

153. Our Control over our Physical Well-being.

HORACE MANN. 306

159. The Insolvent and the Bankrupt.

J. M. BERRIEN. 307

160. Extract from an Address delivered at Chapel Hill. WILLIAM GASTON. 311

161. The Lyre.

MILTON WARD, 312

162. Polish War Song.

JAMES G. PerciVAL. 314

163. Belshazzar.

G. Croly. 314

164. Elijah's Interview.

Thomas Cumpbell. 315

165. Dame Nature's Charms.

WM. C. LODGE, 316

166. Night in Eden.

MRS. E. H. EVANS, 318

167. The Present Age.

DANIEL WEBSTER. 319

163. Melancholy Fate of the Indians..

JOSEPH STORY. 320

169. Edmund Burke.

A. H. EVERETT. 322

170. National Self-Respect.

BEMAN. 323

171. Internal Improvement.

J. C. CALHOUN. 325

172. Founders of our Government.

wm. M. RICHARDSON. 326

173. Conduct of the Opposition.

HENRY CLAY. 327

174. God the Creator.

Fenelon. 323

175. Crescentius.

Miss Landon. 329

176. Address to the Ocean..

Barry Cornroall, 330

Lasson.

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177. The Ursa Major.

HENRY WARE, JR. 331

178. The Fate of Tyranny.

. Mason, 335

179. The Downfall of Poland.

Thomas Campbell. 338

180. Napoleon at Rest.

. JOHN PIERPONT. 339

181. Napoleon Bonaparte.

CHANNING. 340

182. The Thunder Storm..

WASHINGTON IRVING. 342

183. Classical Learning.

JOSEPH STORY. 343

184. The Bunker-Hill Monument.

ent:

DANIEL WEBSTER. 345

185. Appeal in Favor of the Union.

JAMES MADISON. 346

186. France and England. .

JOHN C. CALHOUN. 348

187. Military Insubordination.

HENRY CLAY. 350

188. Loss of National Character.

PRESIDENT MAXCY. 351

189. Lafayette and Napoleon.

E. Everett, 352

190. The Vision of Liberty.

HENRY WARE, JR. 354

191. Shakspeare.

CHARLES SPRAGUE, 356

192. Speech of Rienzi to the Romans.

Miss Mitford. 357

193. Same Subject. .

Thomas Moore. 359

194. Gustavus Vasa to the Swedes.

Brooke. 360

195. A Field of Battle.

Shelley. 361

196. Resistance to Oppression.

PATRICK HENRY. 362

197. Duties of American Citizens.

LEVI WOODBURY. 364

198. Political Corruption.

Geo. M'DUFFIE. 366

199. Intelligence necessary to perpetuate Independence. JUDGE DAwes. 367

200. South American Republics.

DANIEL WEBSTER. 368

201. Excellence of the Holy Scriptures.

Beattie. 370

202. Speech of Mr. Griffin against Cheetham.

370

203. Sir Anthony Absolute and Captain Absolute.

Sheridan. 372

204. Antony's Address to the Roman Populace.

Shakspeare. 375

205. The Victor Angels.

Millon. 377

206. Impressment of American Seamen.

HENRY CLAY. 378

207. “New England, what is she?

TRISTAM BURGES. 379

208. Party Spirit.

WILLIAM GASTON. 381

209. Restless Spirit of Man."

WILBUR FISK. 383

210. Rectitude of Character..

WILLIAM WIRT. 385

211. Washington.

DANIEL WEBSTER. 386

212. Public Faith.

FISHER AMES. 388

213. Free Institutions favorable to Literature.

EDWARD EVERETT. 390

214. The Study of Elocution necessary for a Preacher.

PROF. PARK. 391

215. Relief of Revolutionary Officers.

MARTIN VAN BUREN. 393

216. Kapacity and Barbarity of a British Soldiery.

WM. LIVINGSTON. 394

217. Free Navigation of the Mississippi.

GOUVERNEUR MORRIS. 395

218. Our Duties to our Country..

DANIEL WEBSTER. 397

219. England and the United States.

E. EVERETT. 399

220. Massachusetts and New York.

Gov. SCWARD. 402

221. The Bible.

THOS. S. GRIMKE. 404

222. Fate of Montezuma.

WM. H. PRESCOTT. 405

223. Scenery about Hassen Cleaver Hills.

JOHN A. CLARK. 407

224. The Treasure that Waxeth not Old.

D, HUNTINGTON. 409

225. The Young Mariner's Dream.

Dimond. 410

226. Gustavus Vasa and Cristiern.

Brooke, 411

227. Tamerlane and Bajazet.

Rowe. 414

228. An Independent Judiciary.

JAMES A. BAYARD. 417

229. Memorials of Washington and Franklin.

J. Q. ADAMS. 419

230. Dialogue from Heury IV.

Shakspeure, 421

231. The Love of Truth.

GEORGE PUTNAM. 424

232. Energy of the Will.

THOMAS C. UPHAM, 425

233. The Scholar's Mission.

GEORGE PUTNAM. 42?

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PRE FACE.

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The design of this work is, to furnish a text-book for the systematic teaching of reading and declamation. Of the reading books already in general use, some, though possessed of high literary merit, afford no aid to instruction in elocution; while others offer but a few desultory remarks, and disconnected rules, which do not insure either an adequate knowledge of principles, or a regular progress in the art of reading.

These defects in existing compilations, are, to teachers generally, grounds of just objection and complaint; and the compilers of the present work have been repeatedly solicited to prepare a volume such as is now offered. Speaking with reference to a work of this nature, the late Rev. Dr. Porter, of Andover Theological Seminary, in his "Analysis of Rhetorical Delivery,' says, “The man who shall prepare a schoolbook, containing proper lessons for the management of the voice, will probably do a greater service to the interests of elocution, than has yet been done by the most elaborate works on the subject, in the English language.” And, in a note appended to this passage, “Since this remark was made in my pamphlet on Inflections, several small works, well adapted to the purpose above mentioned, have been published; and one is now in press, entitled, Lessons in Declamation, by Mr. Russell, of Boston, concerning the utility of which, high expectations are justified by the skill of the author, as a teacher of elocution."*

To some persons, the Rhetorical Reader, founded on Dr. Porter's Analysis,' may seem to occupy the ground claimed for the present publication. The compilers would offer, in explanation, not merely their own impressions, but the express objections made by many teachers, when requesting the aid of a book more exactly adapted to the wants felt in actual instruction. The Rhetorical Reader contains, it is admitted, many excellent saggestions on elocution, and many pieces of eminent merit as to their matter. But the marking of inflections, in particular, contravenes, in many parts of that book, the rules and principles of the work itself, and is wholly at variance with appropriate style in reading. The pieces are, to a great extent, of a character better suited to adults and professional readers, than to young persons at school ; and the style of language, in some, is equally negligent and incorrect.

* The publication of the book mentioned above, of which the late Dr. Porter had seen the proofs of the first half of the volume, was unavoidably suspended, in consequence of a change of business, on the part of the publishers who had undertaken it. But the substance of that work is embodied in Part I. of this Reader.

A single word of explanation, perhaps, is due, in relation to the apparent coincidence of plan and rule, in some parts of the present work, with those of the “Rhetorical Reader.' The · Analysis,' on which the Rhetorical Reader,' was founded, was compiled, to a considerable extent, as regards rules and examples, from materials handed, for that purpose, to the Rev. Dr. Porter, by one of the editors of the present volume; and the latter's mode of teaching, as an elocutionist, being, of course, modified by the principles embodied in these materials, a manual of instruction, if prepared by him, must necessarily produce a partial resemblance of method to that of a work partly constructed on the same data.

The compilers of the following work, have drawn, it will be perceived, to a considerable extent, from that invaluable source of instruction in elocution, the Philosophy of the Human Voice, by Dr. James Rush, of Philadelphia. The clearness of exposition, and the precision of terms, in that admirable work, have greatly facilitated, as well as clearly defined, the processes of practical teaching, in whatever regards the discipline of the organs of speech, or the functions of the voice, in utterance and articulation, in emphasis, inflection, modulation, and every other constituent of elocution.

The pieces for practice in reading and speaking, which form the larger portion of this volume, have been selected with great care, as regards their character, not only in relation to the purposes of practice in reading, but with reference to the influence of a high standard of excellence,—both in subject and style, on the mind and taste of young readers. Regard, also, has constantly been paid to the effect which the pieces seemed adapted to produce, as favoring the cultivation of elevated sentiment, and of practical virtue.

The preparation of the pieces for the purpose of applying the rules of elocution, has been regulated by a regard to the importance of placing before the reader, but one principle or rule at a time, of presenting it clearly, and of repeating it with sufficient frequency to fix it firmly on the mind. The marking by which the modifications of the voice are indicated, is, accordingly, restricted, principally, to one subject in each ; so as to avoid confusion, and to secure a full and lasting impression of each rule or principle. In modalation and expression, however, where there exists a natural complexity in the subject itself, the marking is, of course, more intricate. Still, it will be found, we trust, clear and defi.

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