A History of the Penal Laws Against the Irish Catholics, from the Treaty of Limerick to the Union

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The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd., 2003 - History - 226 pages
Parnell, Henry. A History of the Penal Laws Against the Irish Catholics, from the Treaty of Limerick to the Union. Dublin: Printed by H. Fitzpatrick, 1808. 226, xxii pp. Reprinted 2003 by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. LCCN 2002044357. ISBN 1-58477-310-3. Cloth $80. * Reprint of first edition. Sir Henry Parnell [1776-1842], later Lord Congleton, was an Anglo-Irish parliamentarian and treasury official sympathetic to the plight of Irish Catholics. Enhanced by its extensive quotation of source records, this book traces the history of laws against "religious non-conformists" between 1689 and 1801. Though certainly partisan, it is valuable for Parnell's perspective and first-hand knowledge of several crucial events of the 1780s and '90s.

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Page 109 - ... the Pope or any other authority or person whatsoever, or without any hope of any such dispensation from any person or authority whatsoever or without thinking that I am or can be acquitted before God or man or absolved of this declaration or any part thereof although the Pope or any other person or persons or power whatsoever should dispense with or annul the same, or declare that it was null and void from the beginning.
Page 9 - Majesties' obedience, and their and every of their heirs shall hold, possess, and enjoy all and every their estates of freehold and inheritance, and all the rights, titles, and...
Page 109 - Rome are superstitious and idolatrous, and I do solemnly, in the presence of God, profess, testify, and declare, that I do make this declaration and every part thereof in the plain and ordinary sense of the words read unto me as they are commonly understood by English Protestants without any evasion, equivocation, or mental reservation whatsoever...
Page 29 - Whilst this restraint of foreign and domestic education was part of a horrible and impious system of servitude, the members were well fitted to the body. To render men patient, under a deprivation of all the rights of human nature, every thing which could give them a knowledge or feeling of those rights was rationally forbidden. To render humanity fit to be insulted, it was fit that it should be degraded.
Page 109 - I do declare that I do not believe that the Pope of Rome or any other foreign prince, prelate, person, state, or potentate, hath or ought to have any temporal or civil jurisdiction, power, superiority, or pre-eminence, directly or indirectly, within this realm.
Page 108 - I do renounce, reject and abjure, the opinion, that princes excommunicated by the Pope and council, or by any authority of the See of Rome, or by any authority whatsoever, may be deposed or murdered by their subjects, or any person whatsoever...
Page 16 - Ireland, shall have free liberty to go to any country beyond the seas (England and Scotland excepted), where they think fit, with their families, household-stuff, plate, and jewels.
Page 13 - Protestants, by judgments of record, which appearing to the late government, the Lord Tyrconnel and Lord Lucan took away the effects the said John Brown had to answer the said debts, and promised to clear the said John Brown of the said debts ; which effects were...
Page 81 - I also declare, that it is not an article of the catholic faith; neither am I thereby required to believe or profess that the pope is infallible, or that I am bound to obey any order in its own nature immoral, though the pope or any ecclesiastical power should issue or direct such order, but on the contrary...

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