The Bookworm: An Illustrated Treasury of Old-time Literature, Volume 6

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Elliot Stock, 1893 - Bibliography

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Page 289 - Thy word have I hid in my heart, That I might not sin against Thee.
Page 112 - The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely, The pangs of despis'd love, the law's delay, The insolence of office, and the spurns That patient merit of the unworthy takes...
Page 142 - The knights are dust, And their good swords are rust, Their souls are with the saints, we trust.
Page 40 - The Publishers' Circular, and General Record of British and Foreign Literature; giving a transcript of the title-page of every work published in Great Britain, and every work of interest published abroad, with lists of all the publishing houses. Published regularly on the 1st and 15th of every Month, and forwarded post free to all parts of the world on payment of 8s. per annum. The Ladies...
Page 330 - Sir, the venerable age of this great man, his merited rank, his superior eloquence, his splendid qualities, his eminent services, the vast space he fills in the eye of mankind; and, more than all the rest, his fall from power, which, like death, canonizes and sanctifies a great character, will not suffer me to censure any part of his conduct.
Page 112 - tis nobler in the mind, to suffer The stings and arrows of outrageous fortune, Or to take arms against a sea of troubles, And, by opposing, end them ? — To die — to sleep — No more!
Page 173 - With leering looks, bull-faced, and freckled fair, With two left legs, and Judas-coloured hair, And frowzy pores, that taint the ambient air.
Page 142 - As for nobility in particular persons, it is a reverend thing to see an ancient castle or building not in decay, or to see a fair timber tree sound and perfect; how much more to behold an ancient noble family, which hath stood against the waves and weathers of time?
Page 311 - Sir, said I, will you please to eat a piece of beef with me ? Mr. Lintot, said he, I am sorry you should be at the expense of this great book, I am really concerned on your account — Sir, I am much obliged to you : if you can dine upon a piece of beef, together with a slice of pudding — Mr. Lintot, I do not say but Mr. Pope, if he would condescend to advise with men of learning Sir, the pudding is upon the table, if you please to go in.
Page 176 - THE BIBLIOMANIAC'S PRAYER. KEEP me, I pray, in wisdom's way, That I may truths eternal seek ; I need protecting care to-day, My purse is light, my flesh is weak; So banish from my erring heart All baleful appetites and hints Of Satan's fascinating art — Of first editions and of prints. Direct me in some godly walk Which leads away from bookish strife, That I with pious deed and talk May extra-illustrate my life. But if...

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