A collection of fragments illustrative of the history and antiquities of Derby

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G. Wilkins and son., 1826

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Great source of information about the City of Derby.

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Page 67 - YE that we of our special grace and of our certain knowledge and mere motion have given and granted, and by these presents do give and grant...
Page 496 - O Lord, open ,thou our lips. And our mouth shall shew forth thy ,praise. O God, make ,speed > to ,save us. O Lord, make haste > to help us.
Page 510 - Elizabeth, by the grace of God, Queen of England, France, and Ireland, Defender of the faith, &c.
Page 138 - And further, we will, and by these presents, for us, our heirs, and successors do grant to the aforesaid Mayor and...
Page 343 - To sum up her character with the brevity here required — she was a woman of a masculine understanding and conduct; proud, furious, selfish, and unfeeling. She was a builder, a buyer and seller of estates, a moneylender, a farmer, and a merchant of lead, coals, and timber...
Page 217 - ... the oaths, appointed by an act of parliament, made in the first year of the reign of our late...
Page 117 - England concerning succession to an inheritance inasmuch as the inheritance is partible among the heirs male, and from time whereof the memory of man is not to the contrary hath been partible, our Lord the King will not have that custom abrogated...
Page 126 - Township as shall meet in manner hereby directed shall have hold exercise and enjoy the Office or Offices to which he or they shall be so elected and chosen from the time of such Election until the...
Page 207 - The performances of this wonderful man, in whom were united the strength of twelve, were, rolling up a pewter dish of seven pounds as a man rolls up a sheet of paper ; holding a pewter quart at arm's length, and squeezing the sides together like an egg-shell ; lifting two hundred weight with his little finger, and moving it gently over his head. The bodies he touched seemed to have lost their powers of gravitation.
Page 207 - He also broke a rope fastened to the floor, that would sustain twenty hundred weight; lifted an oak table six feet long with his teeth, though half a hundred weight was hung to the extremity : a piece of leather was fixed to one end for his teeth to hold, two of the feet stood upon his knees, and he raised the end with the weight higher than that in his mouth. He took Mr. Chambers, vicar of All Saints, who weighed twenty-seven stone, and raised him with one hand. His head being laid on one chair,...

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