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THE

QUARTERLY REVIEW.

APRIL & DECEMBER, 1818.

VOL. XIX.

LONDON PRINTED.

NEW-YORK:

REPRINTED FOR KIRK AND MERCE

IN

At the Office of the Edinburgh and Quarterly Reviews, No. 22 Wall-Street,

opposite the Manhattan Bank.

Printed by William A. Mercein, No. 93 Gold-Street.

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CONTENTS OF No. XXXVI.

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Art. I. Memoirs, illustrative of the Life and Writings of John

Evelyn, Esq. F. R. S. Author of the Sylva,' &c. &c.

Comprising his Diary, from the Year 1641 to 1705-6,

and a Selection of his familiar Letters. To which is

subjoined, the private Correspondence between King

Charles I. and his Secretary of State, Sir Edward Nicho-

las, wbilst his Majesty was in Scotland, 1641, and at

other Times during the Civil War; also between Sir

Edward Hyde, afterwards Earl of Clarendon, and Sir

Richard Browne, Ambassador to the Court of France,

the Time of Charles I. and the Usurpation. The

whole now first published, from the original MSS. in

two vols. Edited by William Bray, Esq. Fellow and

Treasurer of the Society of Antiquaries of London. 1

II. Notes on a Journey in America, from the Coast of Virginia

to the Territory of Illinois. By Morris Birkbeck, Au-

thor of Notes on a Tour in France.'

54

III. 1. A Treatise upon the Poor Laws. By T. P. Courtenay,

Esq.

2. Remarks on a Course of Education designed to pre-

pare the Youthful Mind for a Career of Honour, Pa,

triotism, and Philanthropy. By Thomas Myers, A. M.

of the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, &c.

3. A Summary View of the Report and Evidence relative

to the Poor Laws, published by Order of the House of

Commons, with Observations and Suggestions. By S.

W. Nicoll.

4. A Letter to the Common Council and Livery of the

City of London on the Abuses existing in Newgate, &c.

By the Hon. H. G. Bennet, M. P.

79

IV. Letters from the Hon. Horace Walpole to George Monta-

gu, Esq. from the Year 1736 to 1770.

118

V. A Sketch of the Military and Political Power of Russia, in

the Year 1817. Fourth Edition.

- 131

VI. Travels in Egypt, Nubia, Holy Land, Mount Libanon,-and

Cyprus, in the Year 1814. By Henry Light, Captain in

the Royal Artillery

178

THE

QUARTERLY REVIEW.

APRIL, 1818.

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ART. I.-Memoirs, illustrative of the Life and Writings of John

Evelyn, Esq. F. R. S. Author of the 'Sylva,' &c. &c. Com-
prising his Diary, from the Year 1641 to 1705-6, and a Se-
lection of his familiar Letters. To which is subjoined, the
private Correspondence between King Charles I. and his Secre-
tary of State, Sir Edward Nicholas, whilst his Majesty was in
Scotland, 1641, and at other times during the Civil War; also
between Sir Edward Hyde, afterwards Earl of Clarendon, and
Sir Richard Browne, Ambassador to the Court of France, in
the time of Charles I. and the Usurpation. The whole now
first published, from the original MSS. in two vols. Edited
by William Bray, Esq. Fellow and Treasurer of the Society of
Antiquaries of London. London. 1818.
THE excellent person whose auto-biography is now

for the first time made public, was eminently happy in this respect, that he was born in that country, place, and condition of life which best suited his moraland intellectual nature. Never had any one more cause to be thankful for all the accidents of his birth. For, omitting what the Grecian philosopher reckoned among his felicities, that he was born a man and not a woman, it was the good fortune of Evelyn to be an European, not the native of any degraded region of the earth; an Englishman, not the subject of a despotic government or a feeble state; of an ancient, honourable, and opulent house; established in a part of England where he could partake the delights of a country life, which no man ever loved more dearly, and the advantages of science and society that the metropolis affords, which no man could estimate more justly or more entirely enjoy. Add to these blessings that he was trained up in the genial feelings of a generous and constitutional loyalty, and in the healthful principles of the church establishment, not jaundiced by the bitter spirit of political or puritanical discontent. He was happy also in the time in which he flourished. The age of Charles II. was as nicely adapted to Evelyn's temper and peculiar talents, as the noonday of chivalry to Edward the Black Prince, and his chronicler Froissart. Had he lived in these days he might have held a respectable rank among chemists or mineralogists; but there would not have been room for him to distinguish himself above his contemporaries, so

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VOL. XIX. NO. XXXVII.

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