The Eclectic review. vol. 1-New [8th]

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Let the reader now pause; and, connecting the extraordinary
claims of the priesthood here noticed, with the nature of the
jurisdiction exercised in the confessional, say whether auricular
confession is not calculated to subjugate and prostrate the
intellect ? It is further to be recollected, that this confession is
imposed upon members of the Church of Rome from the age of
seven years, and upwards: — '
The priest continues what the nurse began,
And thus the child imposes on the man.'
And it is material to mention that the practice under review, by
enabling the Church of Rome to enforce the prohibition of certain
books from its members, in this way also operates most prejudicially
against the growth of the mental powers. The Council of
Trent appointed a committee to prepare an index of prohibited
books; not however having finished their task, the business was referred
to the pope. The index was accordingly published at Rome,
A.D. 1564, confirming the tyrannical regulations of the tenth
session of the council of Lateran, under Leo X.; and among
other decrees the following was issued by the holy see: ' Finally
it is enjoined on all the faithful, that no one presume to keep
or read any books contrary to these rules prohibited by this index.
But if any one keep or read any books composed by heretics,
or the writings of any author suspected of heresy or false doctrine,
he shall instantly incur the sentence of excommunication;
and those who read or keep works interdicted on another account,
besides the mortal sin committed, shall be severely
punished at the will of the bishop.' This law is still enforced :
a permanent committee, styled the 'congregation of the index,'
still exists, and is especially charged with adding to the list.* It
is very true that the ' infallible' decrees of Rome cannot be
enforced to their full extent in England :—thanks to Protestantism,
papists enjoy some little relaxation ; and we suppose the
curse is in some way suspended. But as it is the sworn duty of
the priest to enforce the decrees of the church, there cannot
remain a reasonable doubt that he does prevent those, to whom
he can safely dictate, from perusing books which he conceives
objectionable.
II. Auricular confession necessarily tends to corrupt the morals
of society. We shall abstain from allusions which are calculated
to excite feelings otherwise than delicate ; and simply demand of
fathers, brothers, and husbands, whether the honor and chastity of *
The list contains the works of Luther, and all the reformers, of Erasmus,
Qrotius, Milton, Locke, Jeremy Taylor; and even Young's Night Thoughts !
Page 674
 

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Page 181 - Therefore I endure all things for the elect's sakes, That they may also obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.
Page 441 - Who only hath immortality, dwelling in the light which no man can approach unto ; whom no man hath seen, nor can see : to whom be honour and power everlasting.
Page 675 - Such an act, That blurs the grace and blush of modesty; Calls virtue, hypocrite; takes off the rose From the fair forehead of an innocent love, And sets a blister there; makes marriage vows As false as dicers...
Page 186 - The floods have lifted up, O Lord, the floods have lifted up their voice ; the floods lift up their waves. The Lord on high is mightier than the noise of many waters, yea, than the mighty waves of the sea.
Page 606 - Now fades the glimmering landscape on the sight, And all the air a solemn stillness holds, Save where the beetle wheels his droning flight, And drowsy tinklings lull the distant folds : Save that, from yonder ivy-mantled tower, The moping owl does to the moon complain, Of such as, wandering near her secret bower, Molest her ancient solitary reign.
Page 496 - A bruised reed shall he not break, and the smoking flax shall he not quench : He shall bring forth judgment unto truth.
Page 419 - The King of France with twenty thousand men, • Marched up the hill, and then marched down again.
Page 295 - I am certain she was not joined with good works, and left the court in a staggering condition: Charity came to the King's feet, and seemed to cover the multitude of sins her sisters had committed; in some...
Page 368 - ... clear as the sun, fair as the moon, and terrible as an army with banners...
Page 123 - ... truth, than there be pens and heads there, sitting by their studious lamps, musing, searching, revolving new notions and ideas wherewith to present, as with their homage and their fealty, the approaching reformation : others as fast reading, trying all things, assenting to the force of reason and convincement.

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