Victoria Magazine, Volume 6

Front Cover
Emily Faithfull, 1865
 

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Page 320 - You may observe that amongst all the great and worthy persons (whereof the memory remaineth, either ancient or recent) there is not one that hath been transported to the mad degree of love: which shows that great spirits and great business do keep out this weak passion.
Page 385 - Eccentricity has always abounded when and where strength of character has abounded ; and the amount of eccentricity in a society has generally been proportional to the amount of genius, mental vigour, and moral courage which it contained. That so few now dare to be eccentric, marks the chief danger of the time.
Page 385 - Persons of genius are, ex vi termini, more individual than any other people — less capable, consequently, of fitting themselves, without hurtful compression, into any of the small number of moulds which society provides in order to save its members the trouble of forming their own character.
Page 241 - With those that I saw suffer ! a brave vessel, Who had no doubt some noble creatures in her, Dash'd all to pieces.
Page 67 - ... while this eternal court is open to you, with its society, wide as the world, multitudinous as its days, the chosen and the mighty of every place and time ? Into that you may enter always ; in that you may take fellowship and rank according to your wish ; from that, once entered into it, you can never be an outcast but by your own fault...
Page 133 - Education then, briefly, is the leading human souls to what is best, and making what is best out of them ; and these two objects are always attainable together, and by the same means; the training which makes men happiest in themselves also makes them most serviceable to others.
Page 384 - ... short of injury to others; and that the worth of different modes of life should be proved practically, when anyone thinks fit to try them. It is desirable, in short, that in things which do not primarily concern others individuality should assert itself.
Page 73 - Ah wasteful woman! — she who may On her sweet self set her own price, Knowing he cannot choose but pay — How has she cheapen'd Paradise! How given for nought her priceless gift, How spoiled the bread and spill'd the wine, Which, spent with due, respective thrift, Had made brutes men, and men divine!
Page 441 - DEAD flies cause the ointment of the apothecary to send forth a stinking savour : so doth a little folly him that is in reputation for wisdom and honour.
Page 376 - Do not think of your faults; still less of others' faults: in every person who comes near you, look for what is good and strong: honor that; rejoice in it; and, as you can, try to imitate it: and your faults will drop off like dead leaves, when their time comes.

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