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Just such is the Christian; his course he begins,
Like the sun in a mist, when he mourns for his sins,
And melts into tears; then he breaks out and shines,

And travels his heavenly way:
But when he comes nearer to finish his race,
Like a fine setting sun, he looks richer in grace,
And gives a sure hope at the end of his days

Of rising in brighter array.

THE ROSE.

How fair is the rose! what a beautiful flower,

The glory of April and May!
But the leaves are beginning to fade in an hour,

And they wither and die in a day.
Yet the rose has one powerful virtue to boast,

Above all the flowers of the field;
When its leaves are all dead, and its fine colors lost,

Still how sweet a perfume it will yield ! So frail is the youth and the beauty of men,

Though they bloom and look gay like the rose; But all our fond cares to preserve them is vain,

Time kills them as fast as he goes.
Then I'll not be proud of my youth nor my beauty,

Since both of them wither and fade;
But gain a good naine by well doing my duty;

This will scent like a rose when I'm dead.

FEW HAPPY MATCHES.

Say, mighty Love, and teach my song
To whom thy sweetest joys belong;

And who the happy pairs
Whose yielding hearts, and joining hands,
Find blessings twisted with their bands,

To soften all their cares.
Not the wild herd of nymphs and swains
That thoughtless fly into thy chains,

As custom leads the way:
If there be bliss without design,
Ivies and oaks may grow and twine,

And be as blest as they.
Not sordid souls of earthy mould,
Who drawn by kindred charms of gold

To dull embraces move:
So two rich mountains of Peru
May rush to wealthy marriage too,

And make a world of love.
Not the mad tribe that hell inspires
With wanton flames; those raging fires

The purer bliss destroy :

On Ætna's top let Furies wed,
And sheets of lightning dress the bed

T improve the burning joy.

Nor the dull pairs whose marble forms None of the melting passions warms,

Can mingle hearts and hands : Logs of green wood that quench the coals Are married just like Stoic souls,

With osiers for their bands.

Tain world, farewell to you;

Heaven is my native air:
I bid my friends a short adien,

Impatient to be there.
I feel my powers released

From their old fleshy clod;
Fair guardian, bear me up in baste,

And set me near my God.

Not minds of melancholy strain,
Still silent, or that still complain,

Can the dear bondage bless :
As well may heavenly concerts spring
From two old lutes with ne'er a string,

Or none besides the bass.

Nor can the soft enchantments hold Two jarring souls of angry mould,

The rugged and the keen:
Samson's young foxes might as well
In bonds of cheerful wedlock dwell,

With firebrands tied between.
Nor let the cruel fetters bind
A gentle to a savage mind;

For Love abhors the sight:
Loose the fierce tiger from the deer,
For native rage and native fear

Rise and forbid delight.

SLEEING A DIVINE CALM IN A RESTLESS WORLD.

Eternal mind, who rulist the fates
Of dying realms and rising states,

With one unchanged decree;
While we admire thy vast affairs,
Say, can our little trifling cares

Afford a smile to thee?
Thou scatterest honors, crowns, and gold:
We fly to seize, and fight to hold

The bubbles and the ore:
So emmets struggle for a grain;
So boys their petty wars maintain

For shells upon the shore.
Here a vain man bis sceptre breaks,
The next a broken sceptre takes,

And warriors win and lose;
This rolling world will never stand,
Plunder'd and snatch'd from hand to hand,

As power decays or grows.

Two kindest souls alone must meet; 'Tis friendship makes the bondage sweet,

And feeds their mutual loves : Bright Venus on her rolling throne Is drawn by gentlest birds alone,

And Cupids yoke the doves.

Earth's but an atom: greedy swords
Carve it among a thousand lords;

And yet they can't agree:
Let greedy swords still fight and slay;
I can be poor; but, Lord, I pray

To sit and smile with thee.

LOOKING UPWARD.

The heavens invite mine eye,

The stars salute me round; Father, I blush, I mourn to lie

Thus grovelling on the ground. My warmer spirits move,

And make attempts to fly;
I wish aloud for wings of love

To raise me swift and high

LAUNCHING INTO ETERNITY.
It was a brave attempti adventurous he
Who in the first ship broke the unknown sca:
And, leaving his dear native shores behind,
Trusted his life to the licentious wind.
I see the surging brine: the tempest raves:
He on a pine-plank rides across the waves,
Exulting on the edge of thousand gaping graves.
He steers the winged boat, and shifts the sails,
Conquers the flood, and manages the gales,

Such is the soul that leaves this mortal land,
Fearless when the great Master gives command.
Death is the storm: she smiles to hear it roar,
And bids the tempest waft her from the shore:
Then with a skilful helm she sweeps the seas,
And manages the raging storm with ease

Beyond those crystal vaults,

And all their sparkling balls; They're but the porches to thy courts,

And paintings on thy walls.

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Vain world, farewell to you;

Heaven is my nutive air:
I bid my friends a short adieu,

Impatient to be there.
I feel my powers released

From their old fleshy clod;
Fair guardian, bear me up in haste,

And set me near my God.

SEEKING A DIVINE CALM IN A RESTLESS WORLD.

Eternal mind, who rul'st the fates
Of dying realms and rising states,

With one unchanged decree;
While we admire thy vast affairs,
Say, can our little trifling cares

Afford a smile to thee?
Thou scatterest honors, crowns, and gold :
We fly to seize, and fight to hold

The bubbles and the ore:
So emmets struggle for a grain;
So boys their petty wars maintain

For shells upon the shore.
Here a vain man his sceptre breaks,
The next a broken sceptre takes,

And warriors win and lose;
This rolling world will never stand,
Plunder'd and snatch'd from hand to hand,

As power decays or grows.
Earth's but an atom: greedy swords
Carve it among a thousand lords;

And yet they can't agree:
Let greedy swords still fight and slay;
I can be poor; but, Lord, I pray

To sit and smile with thee.

LAUNCHING INTO ETERNITY.

It was a brave attempt! adventurous he
Who in the first ship broke the unknown sea:
And, leaving his dear native shores behind,
Trusted his life to the licentious wind.
I see the surging brine: the tempest raves:
He on a pine-plank rides across the waves,
Exulting on the edge of thousand gaping graves.
He steers the winged boat, and shifts the sails,
Conquers the flood, and manages the gales.

Such is the soul that leaves this mortal land,
Fearless when the great Master gives command.
Death is the storm: she smiles to hear it roar,
And bids the tempest wast her from the shore:
Then with a skilful helm she sweeps the seas,
And manages the raging storm with ease;

Her faith can govern death; she spreads her wings
Wide to the wind, and as she sails she sings,
And loses by degrees the sight of mortal things.
As the shores lessen, so her joys arise,
The waves roll gentier, and the tempest dies;
Now vast eternity fills all her sight,
She floats on the broad deep with infinite delight,
The seas for ever calm, the skies for ever bright.

tumble knowledge in any science or any business of life, because
op te perpetually Auttering over the surface of things in a
sin 2nd wandering search of infinite variety; ever hearing,

tag, or asking after something new, but impatient of any
anay up and preserve the ideas they have gained. Their
1.3 may be compared to a looking-glass, that, wheresoerer you
2. i receives the images of all objects, but retains none,

harder to preserve your treasure of ideas and the knowledge * Are gained, pursue these advices, especially in your younger

GENERAL DIRECTIONS RELATING TO OUR IDEAS. Direction I.-- Furnish yourselves with a rich variety of ideas ; acquaint yourselves with things ancient and modern; things natural, civil, and religious; things domestic and national; things of your native land and of foreign countries ; things present, past, and future; and, above all, be well acquainted with God and yourselves ; learn animal nature, and the workings of your own spirits.

The way of attaining such an extensive treasure of ideas is, with diligence to apply yourself to read the best books; converse with the most knowing and the wisest of men, and endeavor to improve by every person in whose company you are; suffer no hour to pass away in a lazy idleness, in impertinent chattering, or useless trifles : visit other cities and countries when you have seen your own, under the care of one who can teach you to profit by travelling, and to make wise observations; indulge a just curiosity in seeing the wonders of art and nature; search into things yourselves, as well as learn them from others; be acquainted with men as well as books; learn all things as much as you can at first hand; and let as many of your ideas as possible be the representations of things, and not merely the representations of other men's ideas : thus your soul, like some noble building, shall be richly furnished with original paintings, and not with mere copies.

DIRECTION II.-Use the most proper methods to retain that treasure of ideas which you have acquired; for the mind is ready to let many of them slip, unless some pains and labor be taken to fix them upon the memory.

And more especially let those ideas be laid up and preserved with the greatest care, which are most directly suited, either to your eternal welfare as a Christian, or to your particular station and profession in this life ; for though the former rule recommends a universal acquaintance with things, yet it is but a more general and superficial knowledge that is required or expected of any man, in things which are utterly foreign to his own business ; but it is necessary you should have a more particular and accu. rate acquaintance with those things that refer to your peculiar province and duty in this life, or your happiness in another.

There are soine persons who never arrive at any deep, solid, or

1. Recollect every day the things you have seen, or heard, or nak utich may have made any addition to your understanding: Task the writings of God and men with diligence and perpetual

ews: be not fond of hastening to a new book, or a new chap-
14 al fou have well fixed and established in your mind what

a gelul in the last: make use of your memory in this manner,
5 fou will sensibly experience a gradual improvement of it,
Regan take care not to load it to excess.
! Talk over the things which you have seen, heard, or learnt,
und proper acquaintance; this will make a fresh impres.
a upen your memory; and if you have no fellow student at
kast, line of equal rank with yourselves, tell it over to any of

atopaintance, where you can do it with propriety and de.

; and whether they learn any thing by it or no, your own
namn of it will be an improvement to yourself: and this praca
1 * also will furnish you with a variety of words and copious
I arage, to express your thoughts upon all occasions.

Commit to writing some of the most considerable improve-
Meals which you daily make, at least such hints as may recall
laten again to your mind, when perhaps they are vanished and

1At the end of every week, or month, or year, you may re-
u sta pour remarks for these two reasons: First, to judge of your

and improvement, when you shall find that many of your younger
atentions are either weak and trifling; or if they are just and

Torpetyet they are grown now so familiar to you, that you will
"Setely see your own advancement in knowledge. And in the
18.2. place what remarks you find there worthy of your riper ob-
ketvation, you may note them with a marginal star, instead of
bracribing them, as being worthy of your second year's review,
when the others are neglected.
To shorten something of this labor, if the books which you read
me sour own, mark with a pen, or pencil, the most considerable
angs in them which you desire to remember. Thus you may
say that book the second time over with half the trouble, by your
Te ruoning over the paragraphs which your pencil has noted. It
la very weak objection against this practice to say, I sh

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valuable knowledge in any science or any business of life, because they are perpetually fluttering over the surface of things in a curious and wandering search of infinite variety ; ever hearing, reading, or asking after something new, but impatient of any labor to lay up and preserve the ideas they have gained. Their souls may be compared to a looking-glass, that, wheresoever you turn it, it receives the images of all objects, but retains none.

In order to preserve your treasure of ideas and the knowledge you have gained, pursue these advices, especially in your younger years.

1. Recollect every day the things you have seen, or heard, or read, which may have made any addition to your understanding: read the writings of God and men with diligence and perpetual reviews : be not fond of hastening to a new book, or a new chapter, till you have well fixed and established in your mind what was useful in the last : make use of your memory in this manner, and you will sensibly experience a gradual improvement of it, while you take care not to load it to excess.

2. Talk over the things which you have seen, heard, or learnt, with some proper acquaintance; this will make a fresh impression upon your memory; and if you have no fellow student at hand, none of equal rank with yourselves, tell it over to any of your acquaintance, where you can do it with propriety and de.. cency; and whether they learn any thing by it or no, your own repetition of it will be an improvement to yourself: and this practice also will furnish you with a variety of words and copious language, to express your thoughts upon all occasions.

3. Commit to writing some of the most considerable improvements which you daily make, at least such hints as may recall them again to your mind, when perhaps they are vanished and lost. At the end of every week, or month, or year, you may review your remarks for these two reasons : First, to judge of your own improvement, when you shall find that many of your younger collections are either weak and trifling; or if they are just and proper, yet they are grown now so familiar to you, that you will thereby see your own advancement in knowledge. And in the next place what remarks you find there worthy of your riper observation, you may note them with a marginal star, instead of transcribing them, as being worthy of your second year's review, when the others are neglected.

To shorten something of this labor, if the books which you read are your own, mark with a pen, or pencil, the most considerable things in them which you desire to remember. Thus you may read that book the second time over with half the trouble, by your eye running over the paragraphs which your pencil has noted. It is but a very weak objection against this practice to say, I shall

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