Practical Morality; Or, A Guide to Men and Manners: Consisting of Lord Chesterfield's Advice to His Son. To which is Added, a Supplement Containing Extracts from Various Books, Recommended by Lord Chesterfield to Mr. Stanhope. Together with the Polite Philosopher; Or, An Essay on the Art which Makes a Man Hapopy in Himself, and Agreeable to Others; Dr. Blair's Advice to Youth; Dr. Fordyce on Honour as a Principle; Lord Burghley's Ten Percepts to His Son; Dr. Franklin's Way to Wealth; and Pope's Universal Prayer

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Page 267 - And again, Three removes are as bad as a fire ; and again, Keep thy shop, and thy shop will keep thee ; and again, If you would have your business done, go ; if not, send. And again — He that by the plough would thrive, Himself must either hold or drive.
Page 264 - Sloth like rust, consumes faster than labour wears; while the used key is always bright ' as Poor Richard says. ' But dost thou love life, then do not squander time, for that is the stuff life is made of,' as Poor Richard says. How much more than is necessary do we spend in sleep, forgetting that ' The sleeping fox catches no poultry,' and that 'There will be sleeping enough in the grave,
Page 269 - Always taking out of the meal-tub, and never putting in, soon comes to the bottom, as Poor Richard says; and then, When the well is dry, they know the worth of water. But this they might have known before, if they had taken his advice. If you would know the value of money, go and try to borrow some; for he that goes a borrowing goes a sorrowing...
Page 267 - Trusting too much to others' care is the ruin of many; for, as the Almanack says, in the affairs of this world, men are saved, not by faith, but by the want of it; but a man's own care is profitable; for saith Poor Dick, learning is to the studious, and riches to the careful, as well as, power to the bold, and Heaven to the virtuous. And farther, If you would have a faithful servant, and one that you like, serve yourself.
Page 265 - Industry all easy, as Poor Richard says; and He that riseth late must trot all Day, and shall scarce overtake his Business at Night; while Laziness travels so slowly, that Poverty soon overtakes him...
Page 272 - experience keeps a dear school, but fools will learn in no other," as poor Richard says, and scarce in that; for, it is true, " we may give advice, but we cannot give conduct:" however, remember this, " they that will not be counselled cannot be helped; and farther, that "if you will not hear reason she will surely rap your knuckles,
Page 264 - They joined in desiring him to speak his mind, and gathering round him, he proceeded as follows; "Friends," says he, and neighbours, "the taxes are indeed very heavy, and if those laid on by the Government were the only ones we had to pay, we might more easily discharge them; but we have many others, and much more grievous to some of us. We are taxed twice as much by our idleness, three times as much by our pride, and four times as much by our folly; and from these taxes the commissioners cannot...
Page 270 - Pride breakfasted with Plenty, dined with Poverty, and supped with Infamy. And after all, of what use is this pride of appearance, for which so much is risked, so much is suffered? It cannot promote health, nor ease pain ; it makes no increase of merit in the person ; it creates envy; it hastens misfortune.
Page 269 - He means, that perhaps the cheapness is apparent only, and not real; or the bargain, by straitening thee in thy business, may do thee more harm than good. For in another place he says, Many have been ruined by buying good pennyworths.
Page 267 - Master will do more Work than both his Hands; and again, Want of Care does us more Damage than want of Knowledge; and again, Not to oversee Workmen is to leave them your Purse open. Trusting too much to others...

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