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" With public zeal to cancel private crimes. How safe is treason and how sacred ill, Where none can sin against the people's will, "Where crowds can wink and no offence be known, Since in another's guilt they find their own ! Yet fame deserved no enemy... "
The Poetical Works of John Dryden - Page 93
by John Dryden - 1900 - 559 pages
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The miscellaneous works: containing all his original poems, tales ..., Volume 1

John Dryden, Samuel Derrick - Poetry - 1760
...zeal to cancel private crimes. How fafe is treafon, and how facred ill, Where none can fin againft the people's will ? Where crowds can wink, and no...known, Since in another's guilt they find their own ? Yet fame deferv'd no enemy can grudge ; The ftatefman we abhor, but praife the judge. In Ifrael's...
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The Works of the English Poets: With Prefaces ..., Volume 13, Page 1

Samuel Johnson - Authors, English - 1779
...zeal to cancel private crimes. How fafe is treafon, and how facred ill, V/here none can fm againft the people's will ! Where crowds can wink, and no...known, Since in another's guilt they find their own ? Yet fame deferv'd no enemy can grudge ; The ftatefman we abhor, but praife the judge. In Ifrael's...
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The Critical and Miscellaneous Prose Works of John Dryden ..., Volume 1, Issue 1

John Dryden, Edmond Malone - English prose literature - 1800
...(vol. i. partii. p. 135 — 142. the principal alterations made in the second edition are noticed. " Where crowds can wink, and no offence be known* " Since in another's guilt they find their own ! " Yet fame deserved no enemy can grudge ; " The Statesman we abhor, but praise the Judge : " In Israel's...
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The Critical and Miscellaneous Prose Works of John Dryden, Now First ...

John Dryden, Edmond Malone - 1800
...Irish pronunciation, he probably, when he came to England, adopted the new spelling of his name, •' Where crowds can wink, and no offence be known, " Since in another's guilt they find their own ! " Yet fame deserved no enemy can grudge ; " The Statesman we abhor, but praise the Judge : "In Israel's...
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The Critical and Miscellaneous Prose Works of John Dryden: Now First ...

John Dryden - 1800
...(vol. i. partii. p. 135 — -i^.) the principal alterations made in the second edition are noticed. " Where crowds can wink, and no offence be known, • " Since in another's guilt they find their own ! " Yet fame deserved no enemy can grudge ^ " The Statesman we abhor, but praise the judge : " In Israel's...
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The Critical and Miscellaneous Prose Works of John Dryden, Now First ...

John Dryden - 1800
...part ii. p. 135—149.) the principal alterations made in the second edition arc noticed. •' \Vhcrc crowds can wink, and no offence be known, " Since in another's guilt they find their own | " Yet fame deserved no enemy can grudge; " The Statesman we abhor, but praise the Judge : •' In...
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Bell's Edition: The Poets of Great Britain Complete from Chaucer to ...

English poetry - 1801
...proves, in factious times, ll With public zeal to cancel private crimes. How safe is treason, and now sacred ill, Where none can sin against the people's will ? Where crowds can wink, and no offence bę known, Since in another's guilt they find their ova ? Bit Yet fame deserv'd no enemy can grudge...
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Poetical Works

John Dryden - 1808
...So easy still it proves, in factious times. With public zeal to cancel private crimes. How safe it treason, and how sacred ill, Where none can sin against...will? Where crowds can wink, and no offence be known, Siuce in another's guilt they find their own? Yet fame deserv'd no enemy can grudge ; The statesman...
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A Catalogue of the Royal and Noble Authors of England, Scotland ..., Volume 3

Horace Walpole - English literature - 1806
...himself praises his conduct whilst he administered this great office, saying of him, " Yet fame deserv'd no enemy can grudge, The statesman we abhor, but praise the judge; In Israel's courts ne'er sat an Abethdin With more discerning eyes, or hands more clean j Unbrib'd, unsought, the wretched to redress,...
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The Works of John Dryden: Now First Collected in Eighteen Volumes ..., Volume 9

John Dryden - English literature - 1808
...Introduction. i So easy still it proves in factious times, With public zeal to cancel private crimes. How safe is treason, and how sacred ill, Where none...known, Since in another's guilt they find their own ? Yet fame deserved no enemy can grudge ; The statesman we abhor, but praise the judge. In Israel's...
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