A Handbook of English Politics for the Last Half-century: Being an Outline of English Political History ; Chronologicaly Arranged with Full Lists of Ministries, Notes, Etc

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Page 196 - Queen may know as distinctly to what she has given her royal sanction ; secondly, having once given her sanction to a measure, that it be not arbitrarily altered or modified by the Minister. Such an act she must consider as failing in sincerity towards the Crown, and justly to be visited by the exercise of her constitutional right of dismissing that Minister.
Page 196 - Such an act she must consider as failing in sincerity towards the Crown, and justly to be visited by the exercise of her constitutional right of dismissing that Minister. She expects to be kept informed of what passes between him and the foreign Ministers before important decisions are taken, based upon that intercourse ; to receive the foreign despatches in good time ; and to have the drafts for her approval sent to her in sufficient time to make herself acquainted with their contents before they...
Page 194 - While the House frets over its sevenpence in the pound, the poor are paying twice that number of shillings in the pound on the great staples of their consumption. For every 20s. the working classes expend on tea, they pay 10s. of duty ; for every 20s. they expend on sugar, they pay 6s. of duty ; for every 20s. they expended on coffee, they pay 8s.
Page 217 - March. The Irish University Bill (a) is rejected on the second reading by 287 to 284. Ministerial crisis. Gladstone resigns, but Disraeli refuses to take office. Gladstone then agrees to remain in office, and the ministry is soon after reorganized. Lowe becomes Home Secretary ; Gladstone Chancellor of the Exchequer as well as First Lord of the Treasury; Bruce, created Lord Aberdare, President of the Council; Bright, who had retired through ill-health (Dec.
Page 178 - The credit belongs to others, and not to me. It belongs to Mr. Fox — to Mr. Grattan — to Mr. Plunkett — to the gentlemen opposite, and to an illustrious and right honourable friend of mine who is now no more. By their efforts, in spite of my opposition, it has proved victorious.
Page 214 - That, in accordance with the ancient and constitutional rights of the Irish nation, we claim the privilege of managing our own affairs by a parliament assembled in Ireland, and composed of the sovereign, the lords, and the commons of Ireland.
Page 169 - History of England. For the Use of Middle Forms of Schools. By F. YORK POWELL and JM MACKAY. In two parts, and also in one volume. Part I.— FROM THE EARLIEST TIMES TO THE DEATH OF HENRY VII.
Page 214 - To leave to an Imperial parliament the power of dealing with all questions affecting the Imperial Crown and Government, legislation regarding the colonies and other dependencies of the Crown, the relations of the United Empire with foreign states, and all matters appertaining to the defence and the stability of the empire at large.
Page 176 - Acts, he ably recapitulated their history, 1828and advanced conclusive arguments for their repeal. The annual indemnity Acts, though offering no more than a partial relief to dissenters, left scarcely an argument against the repeal of laws, which had been so long virtually suspended. It could not be contended that these laws were necessary for the security of the church ; for they extended neither to Scotland nor to Ireland. Absurd were the number and variety of offices embraced by the Test Act...
Page 228 - ... that the force to be so employed should be that of the sovereign Power. If this method of procedure should prove impracticable in consequence of unwillingness on the part of the Sultan it will become necessary to devise other measures. Her Majesty's Government continue to hold the view expressed in their circular of February 11, that any intervention in Egypt should represent the united action and authority of Europe.

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