Putting Popular Music in Its Place

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, 1995 - Music - 390 pages
This volume of essays by the distinguished musicologist Charles Hamm focuses on the context of popular music and its interrelationships with other styles and genres, including classical music, the meaning of popular music for audiences, and the institutional appropriation of this music for hegemonic purposes. Specific topics include the use of popular song to rouse anti-slavery sentiment in mid-nineteenth-century America, the reception of such African-American styles and genres as rock 'n' roll and soul music by the black population of South Africa, the question of genre in the early songs of Irving Berlin, the attempts by the governments of South Africa and China to impose specific bodies of music on their populations, and the impact of modernist modes of thought on writing about popular music.
 

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Contents

Modernist narratives and popular music
1
Rock and the facts of life
41
the US since World War II
55
or The Hutchinson Family and popular song as political and social protest
98
music
116
Elvis a review
131
Home cooking and American soul in black South African popular music
139
Rock n roll in a very strange society
150
Music and radio in the Peoples Republic of China
270
Towards a new reading of Gershwin
306
A blues for the ages
325
Graceland revisited
336
nationalism racism and national race
344
The last minstrel show?
354
The Role of Rock a review
367
Genre performance and ideology in the early songs
370

AfricanAmerican music South Africa and apartheid
167
Separate Development Radio Bantu and music
210
music and radio in South Africa
249
John Cage revisited
381
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