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Pride did intend the sequel of my ruth,
Began the faults and follies of my youth.
I left the fields and took me to the town,
Fold sheep who list, the hook was cast away;
Menalcas would not be a country clown,
Nor shepherd's weeds, but garments far more gay:

Even then,

When thus
Aspiring thoughts did follow after ruth,
Began the faults and follies of my youth.
My suits were silk, my talk was all of state,
I stretch'd beyond the compass of my sleeve;
The bravest courtier was Menalcas' mate,
Spend what I would, I never thought on grief :

Even then,

When thus I lash'd out lavish, then began my ruth, And then I felt the follies of my youth. I cast mine eye on every wanton face, And straight desire did hale me on to love; Then lover-like I pray'd for Venus' grace, That she my mistress' deep affects might move:

Even then,

When thus Love trapp'd me in the fatal bands of ruth, Began the faults and follies of my youth. . No cost I spar'd to please my mistress' eye, No time ill-spent in presence of her sight; Yet oft she* frown'd, and then her love must die, But when she smil'd, O then a happy wight!

Even then,

When thus
Desire did draw me on to deem of ruth,
Began the faults and follies of my youth.

* she] The 4to. “ we.”

The day in poems often did I pass,
The night in sighs and sorrows for her grace;
And she, as fickle as the brittle glass,
Held sun-shine showers within her flattering face :

Even then,

When thus
I spied the woes that women's loves ensu'th,
I saw and loath the follies of my youth.

I noted oft that beauty was a blaze,
I saw that love was but a heap of cares;
That such as stood as deer do at the gaze,
And sought their wealth amongst affection's tares, *

Even such

I saw
With + hot pursuit did follow after ruth,
And foster'd up the follies of their youth.

Thus clogg'd with love, with passions, and with grief,
I saw the country life had least molest;
I felt a wound, and fain would have relief,
And this resolv'd I thought would fall out best :

Even then,

When thus
I felt my senses almost sold to ruth,
I thought to leave the follies of my youth.

To flocks again; away the wanton town,
Fond pride avaunt; give me the shepherd's hook,
A coat of gray, I'll be a country clown;
Mine eye shall scorn on beauty for to look :

No more

Ado;
Both pride and love are ever pain’d with ruth,
And therefore farewell the follies of my youth.

* tares] The 4to. “ thares.
With] The 4to « Which.

FROM FAREWELL TO FOLLY.

(ED. 1617.)

DESCRIPTION OF THE LADY MÆSIA.*
Her stature and her shape were + passing tall,
Diana like, when 'longst the lawns she goes ;
A stately pace, like Juno when she brav’d
The Queen of love, I 'fore Paris in the vale ;
A front beset with love and majesty ;
A face like lovely Venus when she blush'd
A seely shepherd should be beauty's judge ;
A lip sweet ruby-red grac'd with delight;
Her eyes two sparkling stars in winter night,
When chilling frost doth clear the azur’d sky;
Her hairs in tresses twin'd with threads of silk,
Hung waving down like Phobus in his prime;
Her breasts as white as those two snowy swans
That draw & to Paphos Cupid's smiling dame;
A foot like Thetis when she tripp'd the sands
To steal Neptunus' favour with her || steps;
In fine, a piece despite of beauty fram’d,
To see what Nature's cunning could afford.

SONG.
Sweet are the thoughts that savour of content;

The quiet mind is richer than a crown;
Sweet are the nights in careless slumber spent ;

The poor estate scorns fortune's angry frown: Suchsweet content, such minds, such sleep, such bliss, Beggars enjoy, when princes oft do miss.

* This is an alteration and abridgement of a copy of verses in the Morando : see p. 215.

† were] The 4to. “ was.” I loves The 4to. heaven :" but see p. 215. $ draw) The 4to. drawes.ll her] The 4to. his."

The homely house that harbours quiet rest;

The cottage that affords no pride nor care;
The mean that 'grees with country music best ;

The sweet consort of mirth and music's fare ;
Obscured life sets down a type of bliss :
A mind content both crown and kingdom is.

LINES TRANSLATED FROM GUAZZO. He that appal'd * with lust would sail in haste to Co

rinthum, There to be taught in Lais'school to seek for a mistress, Is to be train’d in Venus' troop and chang'd to the

purpose; Rage embrac'd, but reason quite thrust out as an exile; Pleasure a pain, rest turn'd to be care, and mirth as

a madness; Fiery minds inflam'd with a look enrag'd as Alecto; Quaint in array, sighs fetcht from far, and tears,

many, feigned ; Pensive, t sore deep plung'd in pain, not a place but

his heart whole; Days in grief and nights consum'd to think on a god

dess; Broken sleeps, sweet dreams, but short fro the night

to the morning; Venus dash’d, his mistress' face as bright as Apollo; Helena stain'd, the golden ball wrong-given by the

shepherd ; Hairs of gold, eyes twinkling stars, her lips to be rubies; Teeth of pearl, her breasts like snow, her cheeks to be roses;

[kneestead ; Sugar candy she is, as I guess, fro the waist to the Nought is amiss, no fault were found if soul were

amended ; All were bliss if such fond lust led not to repentance.

* appald] Qy. assaild.
+ Pensive] The 4to. Pen sicke.

FROM DANTE.

A Monster seated in the midst of men,
Which, daily fed, is never satiate;
A hollow gulf of vild ingratitude,
Which for his food vouchsafes not pay of thanks,
But still doth claim a debt of due expence.
From hence doth Venus draw the shape of lust;
From hence Mars raiseth blood and stratagems.
The wrack of wealth, the secret foe to life ;
The sword that hasteneth on the date of death;
The súrest friend to physic by disease;
The pumice that defaceth memory;
The misty vapour that obscures the light,
And brightest beams of science' glittering sun,
And doth eclipse the mind with sluggish thoughts :
The monster that affords this cursed brood,
And makes commixture of those dire mishaps,
Is but a stomach overcharg'd with meats,
That takes delight in endless gluttony.

VOL. II.

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