Historical Sketches of the Angling Literature of All Nations

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J. R. Smith, 1856 - Fishing - 335 pages
 

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Page 343 - ANECDOTA LITERARIA; a Collection of Short Poems in English, Latin, and French, illustrative of the Literature and History of England in the Xlllth Century ; and more especially of the Condition and Manners of the different Classes of Society.
Page 182 - And, whitening, down their mossy-tinctur'd stream Descends the billowy foam: now is the time, While yet the dark-brown water aids the guile, To tempt the trout. The well-dissembled fly, The rod fine-tapering with elastic spring, Snatch'd from the hoary steed the floating line, And all thy slender wat'ry stores prepare.
Page 183 - There throw, nice-judging, the delusive fly; And as you lead it round in artful curve, With eye attentive mark the springing game.
Page 65 - You see the ways the fisherman doth take To catch the fish ; what engines doth he make ? Behold ! how he engageth all his wits ; Also his snares, lines, angles, hooks, and nets...
Page 349 - CARDS.— Facts and Speculations on the History of Playing Cards in Europe. By WA Chatto, author of the "History of Wood Engraving;" with Illustrations by J. Jackson. 8vo, profusely illustrated with engravings, both plain and coloured. Cloth, 1. Is. " The inquiry into the origin and signifi- subject.
Page 184 - With yielding hand, That feels him still, yet to his furious course Gives way, you, now retiring, following now Across the stream, exhaust his idle rage; Till floating broad upon his breathless side, And to his fate abandon'd, to the shore You gaily drag your unresisting prize.
Page 342 - A PHILOLOGICAL GRAMMAR, grounded upon English, and formed from a comparison of more than Sixty Languages. Being an Introduction to the Science of Grammars of all Languages, especially English, Latin, and Greek. By the Rev. W. Barnes, B D., of St. John's College, Cambridge; Author of " Poems in the Dorset Dialect,
Page 151 - O man of the sea! Come listen to me, For Alice my wife, The plague of my life, Hath sent me to beg a boon of thee!
Page 345 - VESTIGES OF THE ANTIQUITIES OF DERBYSHIRE, and the Sepulchral Usages of its Inhabitants, from the most Remote Ages to the Reformation.
Page 120 - The smooth-leav'd beeches in the field receive him, With coolest shade, till noon-tide's heat be spent. His life is neither tost in boisterous seas, Or the vexatious world, or lost in slothful ease; Pleas'd and full blest he lives, when he his God can please.

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