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AcADEMY, what a youth first learns there
Active men, compared with speculative .
Acts, public, at Oxford, two great reasons against
eful . - - - - - - -
Adam, his vision of souls .
Adamites, a sect so called .
Age, if healthy, happy
Dwells upon past times . . . . . . .
Aguire, his story, an instance of the spirit of
revenge . . . . . . .
Airs, the penman, his vanity . . - - -
Alcibiades, his character, and soliloquy before
an engagement . . . . . . . .
Alcinous, his gardens described, from Homer . 173
Alcor'. an elegantone, on Hampstead

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• * * * * * Alexander, a letter from him to Aristotle . Allegories, directions for using them Alnareschin, king of Persia, his story - Alonzo, don, a fatal instance of the effects of jealousy . . . - - - Alphonso, his story from Strada's Lucan . Aminta, of Tasso, compared with Guarini's Pastor Fido - - - - - Anacreon, his instructions to a painter for paint

Barbers, inconveniences attending their being

28| Binicorn, Humphrey, his proposal for printing a
. . . 124

No.

historians . - - - - - Bareface, Will, desires one of Lady Lizard's

daughters for a wife . . . . . . . . . . Barsisa, santon, his story from the Turkish Tales 148 Bath, Wise of a comedy, characterised . 50

Customs of that place . - - - . 174 Bawd, a mother so, to her own daughter . 17 Bear-baiting, a barbarous custom 61 Beau, an academical one described . 10 A species to be commiserated 62 Beauty, inconvenience attending it . 85 At war with Fortitude . - 152 Imperfect, described by Prior 85

Benevolence, the seeds of it implanted in the

human soul - - 126 Betty, miss, her history . . . . . . 159 Beveridge, bishop, a sublime passage quoted from his works . - - - Bicknell, Mrs. a comedian commended . . 50 Furnished with a dress from the wardrobe of the Lizards. - - - - Bias, his way of silencing calumny 135

dissertation on horns .

ing his mistress . - - - - - Birds, their examples proposed to imitation . 125 Anaximander, a saying of his, on being laughed Observations on their conjugal and parental at for singing . . . . . . affections . . . . . . . . Ancestors, their examples should excite to great Blanket, when that discipline is necessary .. 74 and virtuous actions . . . . . . 137 | Blood, by what tainted . . . . . 137 Ancestry, how far to be venerated . 137 | Bodkin, Timothy, his letter concerning short Renders the good only illustrious . . . . . 123 swords - - - - - - Ridiculous for a man to value himself upon it 137 | Boileau, a French critic, his account of the Ancients, crying them up reproved . - . 25 sublime . - - - - - All that is good in writing not borrowed from Books, an odd collection of them . 60 them . - - - - - - . 12 | Bosoms, naked, a great grievance . 116 Distinguished by Strada . . . . . 119 || The pope's order against them . 116 Androcles, story of him and the lion. . 139|| Boys, their delights cheap and innocent 62 Anger defined . . . . . . . . . . 129 | Bribery, none in a present of liquor . . 160 Animals, a degree of gratitude owing to them Bruce, lord, his challenge to, and duel with sit that serve us . - - - - - Edward Sackville - - . 129, 133 Cruelty towards them condemned . 61 Bubnelia, angry about the tucker ... 109 Anne Bullen, tragedy of, a scene of distress Building, errors in undertaking it ... 6

therein - - Annihilation, by whom desired .

- - . 89 Ants, natural history of them . 128, 156, 157

Burial service, solemn and moving . - . 21
Button, Daniel, his letter in

praise of his own coffee-house - - -

Apothecary, in Romeo and Juliet described 82 | Button-twisting, not eloquent 84
Arcadian, the true character of one . - . .
Art, those most capable of it, always fond of CALAMities, the general source of them . . 1
nature - - - - - - 3| Calumny, nothing so hard for a generous mind
Artificers, capital, a petition from them 64 to get over . . . . . . . . 135
Aspasia, a most excellent woman . . 2, 5 || How silenced by philosophers . . . 135
Asphaltites, lake of a discourse thereon . 60 | Cambray, Fenelon, archbishop of, account of his
Astronomy, the study of recommended . 70 Treatise of the Existence, Wisdom, and
Atalantis, the author of, to whom akin ... 107 Omnipotence of God . . . . . 69
Athalia, of Racine, part of it sublime . 117 | Cause of his disgrace . . . . . 48
Atheism more grievous than religion 93|Cardan, the philosopher, what he says of the
Atheist, behaviour of one in sickness . . 39 affection of love . - - - - -
Athenais, a Grecian virgin, married to the empe- Care, Dorothy, complains of men's open bosoms 171
ror Theodosius . - - - - . 155 Cato, tragedy of commended . - - , 43
Attraction of bodies applied to minds . 126 Beautiful similes in that tragedy . . 64
Augustus Caesar, Virgil's praises of him . . 138| Prologue and Epilogue thereto - -
Aureng Zebe, tragedy of, wherein faulty . . 110|Chaplains to persons of quality ought to be re-
Author, account of one raising contributions 58 spect - - - . . . 162
Charity, a virtue of the heart . . . . . . . . 166
Bacon, sir Francis, remarks on the style of his A signal proof of the divinity of the Christian
history of Henry VII. . . . . . . religion . . . . . . . . . 126

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Cowley, Mr. criticism on his songs . - -
Coxcomb at the head of a family a melancholy

thing . . . . . . . . 165
Crabtree, Major, his sour sayings to the ladies. 26
Crassus, an old lethargic valetudinarian . ... 102
Creation, works of the divine consideration of
them . . . . . . . . 175
Critics, false . . . . . . 12, 16
Wherein they differ from cavillers . . 110
The severity of one on the fireworks on the
Thames . - - - - - -
The characters and marks of an ill one by Mr.
Congreve - - - - - . 115
Criticism on song-writing . . . . . 16
On several plays of Dryden's and Lee's . 110

No. - No.
. 166 Cromwell, Oliver, what monsieur Paschal says
of his death - - - - - -
Cunning opposed to wisdom . . . 152
Cupid with eyes . . . . . . 127
Customs, barbarons in Fngland, account of them 61

Cyrus, his heroic chastity . . . . . 61
Cyr, Saint, account of that monastery founded

by madam Maintenon

D.EDALUS, his letter about flying . . . . . 112
Damo, a daughter of Pythagoras, to whom he

left his writings . - - - - -
David, king, the beauty of his lamentations for

Jonathan . - - - - . 51
A rabbinical story concerning him . . 138
Davigne, Messrs. father and grandfather of
madam Maintenon, their story : - -
Davis, Sir George, his adventure with a lion . 145
Dead men, only, have honours in China . 96
Death, means to make the thoughts thereof the
sweetest enjoyment . - - - . 18
An infirmity not to desire it . - - ... :)
The hope of good men in it . - . 169
Compared to Proteus . . . . 135
Whence the abhorrence of it proceeds . . 169
Yelications, the abuse of them - - ... 4
Dedication of an author to himself . . . 4
Defamation, the art of it discovered . - . 170
Definition of words necessary - so

Denham, sir John, his directions for translating 164
Derham, Mr. his book of Physico-Theology com-
mended . - - - - - . 175
Des Cartes, discovered the pineal gland in the
brain . . . . - - - -
Detraction, too easily given in to by the ladies 85
Devotion, early hours of the advantages of it . 65
Dewlap, Dick, well made for a jester . 42
Diaper, James, his letter recommending Tom's
collec-house for politeness of conversation. 92
Diogenes, a severe saying of his to one that
slandered him - - - - -
His opinion concerning the poor and rich 94
Distress, a scene of it in the tragedy of Anne
Eullen - - - - - - ... 1
Imaginary, the greatest part of man's affliction 162
Ditton and Whiston, their letter concerning the
longitude . - - - - - ... 107
Donne, Dr. a criticism on his songs . . . 16
Dream, concerning Reproof and Reproach . 56

Of a window in Aurelia's breast . - ... 106
Concerning death . . . . . . . 136
Of the future punishment of the idle . . 158
Dress, the greatest motive to love . . . 81
Not to be too much valued or despised ... 10
Genius discovered therein - - . 149
Compared to poetry . . 149

io hold the doctrine of transmigration of
souls . - - - - - . . .
Verses from Lucan on that subject . . 18
Drunkenness, a deforming foolish intemperance 55
Dryden, John, moral verses from his translation

of Juvenal . - - : - : . .
A saying of his, recommending chastity in ..

inten . - - - - - - - -
Faulty in his sentiments - - - 110

Duels, the danger of dying in one, represented on
Proceed from false honour - . 133
Ought to be abolished . - - - . 1:9
Dump, Goody, her letter complaining of a sullen
husband . - - - - - ... 1
Dunkirk, animadversions concerning demolish-
ing it . . - - - - . 128, 131
D'Urfey, Thomas, the lyric poet, his merit, and
odes . - - - - - - -
Compared with Pindar . . . . 67
The world ungrateful to him - . 20
His play of the Plotting Sisters recommend 82
Dutch, their advantages over the French. . 52
Not subject to the spleen - - - . 131

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Ease, loved by all men . . . . 22
In writing, what it is . - . 12, 15
An instance of it in love verses - . 15
Eclogue, meaning of that word . . . 28
Education, various errors therein . - 94
Eliza, the character of a good mother . . 150
Enemies, love of them not constitutional . . 20
English, famous for oddities . . . . . 55
Epic poem, rules concerning it . . - . 12
Receipt to make one . . . . . . 7
Epictetus, his saying concerning censure . . 135
Epigram, a French one, miscalled a song . . 16
Epilogue to Cato, by Dr. Garth. . . . 33
Equality in the happiness and misery of men . 54
Eusden, Reverend Mr. translations of his from
Claudian . - - - - . 127, 164
Eve, her treating of an angel described by
Milton - - - - - . . . 138
Her innocence to be imitated, not her naked-
ness - - - - - - . 100
Eveites, women so called, and why . . . . 140
Evergreen, Anthony, his collection of fig-leaves
for the ladies - - - - -
Fxamination, self, advantages attending it . 158
Examiner, author of reproved for insolence, ill-
manners, and scandal - - - . 41
Misapplies the word Church, and abuses the
clergy, lords, and commons - - -
Letters concerning him . . . 53, 63
An advocate for a lady who was said not to
be lain with - - - - - -
His insolence to a bishop of the church of
England . - - - - - -
Writes in defence of popery . - 90
His knack at finding out treason in words . 160
Has no talent for panegyric . . 170
Example, influence thereof . . . . 5
FABLE, of Pilpay, on the usage of animals 6]
Fame, common, house of described . - 66
Family, head of dangerous when bad . . . 165
Mistress of a good one described, from the
book of Proverbs - - - - . 168
Fantastical pleasures, what they are - . 49
Fear of God, all true fortitude founded on it . 117
Feet, pretty ones, a letter concerning them . 132
Figleaf, Leonilla, her letter concerning modesty-
pieces. - - - - - - . 118
Fine gentleman, what qualifications form one in
the eye of the ladies . - 34
Character of a complete one. - - . 34
Fireworks on the Thames, description of
them . - - - - - - ... 103
A fine one described by Strada . 103
Flattery, a satire against it . . . . 11
Grateful to human nature 135
Flies and free-thinkers compared 70
Florrella, angry about the tucker 109

Flying, a humour in the reign of Charles the
Second - - - - - . 112
Fontainbleau, palace of described . ... 101
Footman, too fat for his master. - - . 54
Foresight, Frank, his good conduct on hi,
- - . 147

marriage - - -
Fornication, a criticism thereon - . 17
Fortitude founded on the fear of God . 117

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Gamesters, a panegyric on them - - . 74
Gaming, ill consequences of that vice among
the ladies . - - - - - -
Gardens, the best not so fine as nature . . 173
Genius, necessary to dress well . . . 87
Gentleman, qualifications requisite to form that
exalted character . . . . . 34
Wherein really superior to a mechanic . 130
Gentlemanlike, gentlemanly, much of a gentle-
man, ill-applied . - - - - -
Gluttony, barbarous and destructive. - . 61
Gnatho, a mad doctor, wonderful cures perform-
ed by him . . . . . . .
Goldfinch, a beau, his behaviour to his offspring
roposed for imitation - - - -
Golo. the necessity of it - -
Good Friday, reflections preparatory to the ob-
servation of that day . . . . . . 20
Good-nature and charity recommended . . 79
Gospels, the excellency of them . . . 21
Grave-digger in Hamlet, humour of that charac-
ter . - - - - - . 14
Greens, a curious collection to be sold . 173
Greek, two sorts - - - - - . 78
Griffins, a treatise on the existence of them . 60

Guardian, the qualifications for one, integrity
more necessary than understanding . . I
The use of his paper . - - - -

HAMI.ET, prologue therein, as spoken by Mr.

William Peer . . . . . . . 82
Happiness, various notions of it, and wherein it
consists . - - - - - . 31
With respect to marriage . . . . 31
Hawthorn, Nic, his whimsical letter concerning
public spirit - - - - - -
Hearty, sir William, why he was not a fine
gentleman . - - - - - -
Henry VII. criticism on the style of Lord Veru-
lams's History of that king - - -
Henry IV. of France, a prayer made by him
before a battle . . . . . . ]
Hermaphroditical habit, described . . . 149
Hilaria, her madness and cure . - . 11
History, rules for writing, it . . . . 25
Ofa Greek poet . .". - - - 141
Holiness, beauty of it - - - - 21
Holt, lord chief justice, his integrity. 95
Honour, what . . . . . . . 161
Wherein commendable, and when to be ex-
ploded, &c. - - - - - . 161
Described . . . . . . . 161

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A poem in praise of it . . . . 125

Hypocrisy, rebuked by our Saviour . . . 93
I AM that I am, reflections on that name . . 74
Idle men, monsters in the creation . . . 157
Idleness, a great vice - - - - . 131
A means to conquer it . - - - . 131
Idolatry, a sottish sort of worship . . . 88
Ignorance and vice, taint the blood . - . 137
Immortality of the soul, arguments for it . 89, 93
Ingratitude of men to beasts . - - 61
Integrity in the power of every man - 1
Intrigue between a wild young gentleman and
a jilt . . . . . . . . . 14
Irish stuffs, fine and delightful furniture . . 49
Ironside, Nestor, esq. account of his birth and
education - ... 2

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p - - - -
Asserted by Mr. Steele . . . . . 53
Freethinkers enemies thereto - -
Life, its several stages have several pleasures. 62
Lilly, Charles, his petition - . . . 64
Lingerers, account of them . . . . 131
Lion, Walsingham's master spy, some account
of him - - - - . . . Tol
To be set up at Button's coffee-house 94,114, 124
Scandalous reports of him . . . . 134
IIistory of his species . - - - . 133
Calculation of his nativity . - - . 140

Sir George Davis's lion . - - - . 146
Lions, spies so called, infesting London, des-
scribed - - - - - - . 145
Liquors, no bribery in them . . . . 150
Little men, a club of them - - - . 91
Lizard, sir Ambrose, chooses Mr. Ironside guar-
dian to his family . . . . . 2
Sir Harry, his character - - ... 6
Lady, her character, and manner of employ-
ing her time - - - . 2, 5, 7
Characters of Miss Jane, Miss Annabella, Miss
Betty, Miss Cornelia, and Miss Mary -
Characters of Mr. Thomas, Mr. William, and
Mr. John . - - - - - . 13
Loan-bank, a project . . . . . 97, lu"
Lock #. patients there, great objects of
charity - . 17

Oblations of a chamber-maid thereto . ... of
Longbottom, John, the barber, his petition . 64
Longinus, his best rule for the sublime . . 152
Longitude, proposals concerning the discovery
of it . . . . . . . . I (8
Love of enemies, not constitutional . . 20
Love, personated by Ambition and Avarice . 152
In low life - - - - - -
Loungers, a sect of philosophers at Cambridge 124
Lucan, translation of his verses on the transmi-
gration of souls . - - - . . 18

Lucan, Strada's, commended . - - . 115
Lucas, Dr. his Practical Christianity recom-
mended . - - - - - - . 63
Lucifer, his description of a masquerade at the
French ambassador's . - - - . 154
Lucretiris, Strada's . - - - . 115, 119
Luke, saint, contents of the twenty-fourth chap-
ter of his gospel . - - - - 21
Lust, opposed to Modesty . . . . . . 153
Lycurgus, the character of a good master . 87
The Spartan, his good laws concerning matri- 100

mony . . . . . . .
Lyrics, the English, very fine . . . . 1:

MACHINE’s, modern free-thinkers are such . 130
Mad doctor, account of one, and his medicines ll
Maid's tragedy, Mr. Waller's saying of it. . 37

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