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Modely, (Tom) his knowledge of the fashion . 166
Head of the order of insipids. - - . 166
Modest men distinguished from modest fellows 52
Modesty described . - - . . . 52
Different in men and women - - . 52
The chief ornament of the fair sex - . 84
Its advantages in men . - - . 86
Monarchy, the genius thereof described . 161
Monoculous, a sharper . - - - . 56
His reflections on Africanus . - - . 36
Monosyllables, a disgrace to the English language 230
Mons invested . . - - - t;2, 76
Taken . - - - - - - . 83
Montpelier compared to Anticyra . . 125
Mopsa, her good fortune in the lottery prognos-

ticated - - - - - -
Letter to her . - - - - - - . 124
In great danger of her life for being left out
of the masquerade . - - " - . 146
Morphew, (John) appointed Mr. Bickerstasi's
chamber-keeper - - - - ... 103
General of the dead men - - - ... 103
Morning described by Milton - 163
The beauties of . - - - - . 263
In town, described - - - - . 9
Moveables of the play-house, sale of them frus-
trated . - - * - - - -
Mountebanks, their artifices to ensnare the
vulgar - . 240

Mourning, a proper dress for a beautiful lady . 151
Music cures the spleen . - - - . 47
Mutton, the food of our hardy ancestors . . 148
Myrmidons, their history . . . . . . . 56
NAB, (Ralph) haberdasher of hats, his petition . 270
Naked Truth, a dangerous pamphlet. - . 17
Nassau, Count Manrice of, killed . - . 21()

Prince of his gallantry . - - - ... 69
Naturalization act, its advantages . . . 13

Nature, its prevalency - . . . 172

Nestor, a great but too modest architect . . 52

Newman, (Richard) indicted by major Punto in
the court of honour . - . 250

Newspapers hurtful to weak heads . . . i.
Writers in a panic . - - - - . 18
The shifus they are put to . . . 19, 42

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Newspaper writers, Chelsea College proposed
for them . - - - - - -

18
Nice, (Will) a sop . - - - - . 14
Nicolini, (Signor) his excellencies on the stage 115

Night, longer formerly in this island than at
present - - - - - - . 463
No, when to be used by young people . . 83
Mobilis declared to be no rake . - - . 27

Nonsense, a prevailing part of eloquence among
ladies - - - - - - -
Northern parts, fruitful in bag-pipes.
Noses, a dissertation on . - - - -
so (sir Jeffry) a member of the Trumpet
Club . • - - - - - -
Nottingham, why young ladies cannot sleep there 222
234

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200

Nova Zembla, account of . - - -
Novelists, efiects of their writings .

| Noy, his expedient to reclaim his son by a legacy 9

Nurses, their abuses of infants exposed . . 15
Nunnery, by a platonic lady . . . . . .32, 63
The manner of receiving young ladies into

nunneries . - - - - - -

OGLERs complained osby the ladies. . 145

Dangerous . - - - - . 145
Ogling gains women . - - - - . 22
Old age, wherein delighted . . . . 207
Old Lachelor, account of that comedy 8, 195
Opera, in female conversation . - - . 157 -

Italian, considered . - ... 4

The understanding has no part in it . . 4
Oppression, an attendant on Tyranny . . 161

Orangerie described . - - - - 179
Orator in a night-gown and laced cap . . 186
Oriando the fair, his history . - . 50, 51
Organ-lost, ladies treated in one - - . 61
Orson, (Thicket) his character and passion for
Cleora - - - - - - -
Osmyn, the civil husband . - - - . 53
Oxford described - . . . - 39
Almanack considered . . . . . . 39
Discipline applauded . . . 30, 39
Puppet-show there - - - . 45
PA.com. ET, a guardian angel, his first appearance
to Mr. Bickerstaff . . . . . . 13
Account of his former wards. - - . 13
His life of a monih - - - - . 15
His checks and admonitions . - - . 14

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tion - - - - - - - -
Paradise Lost fills the mind with good thoughts
and pleasing ideas . . - - - -
Parents, the folly of partiality to their children 235
Generally err in marrying their children . 193
Parisatis, her manner of converting her neice
from coquetry - - -
Paris Gazette burlesqued . - - - ... 2
Parrot, verses on one - - - - ...
Parsimony, a favourite in the temple of Avarice 123
Party, all parties composed of the rigid and
supple - - - - . . . . . 214
The prevalence of parties, and party prejudice
in England . . . - - - - -
Partridge, (Mr. John) his manner of surprising

sharpers . - - -- -
His death demonstrated . . . - ... 1
Account of his funeral - - - . 99
A letter from him, intimating some signs of

resuscitation - - - " - - . 118

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Nunneries established by . . .
Players, why they should be esteemed
Must forget they are before an audience
Instructed by Shakspeare . . .
Blamed for inserting words
Purallels between them • . . .
Playhouse, one only should be supported .
At Amsterdam org.K." almshouse .

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99
20

No.
Playhouse on fire in Denmark . . . . . 94
Plays, proper incitements to good behaviour . 3
Modern, described. - - - - 3, 21
Pleasing, in conversation, a happy talent . . 61
Pleasure, deceitful . - - - - . 91
Plenty, a goddess in the region of liberty . . 161
Pliny, his letters to his wife . . . 149
His compliment and advice to Trajan . . 130
Pluto, his palace and throne described . . 156
Poetasters ridiculed . - - - . . 106
Catalogue of the labours of one . ... 106
Poetry, the foundation of . . . . -
Eficacy of it on the mind . . . . 98
A remedy for the spleen . . . . 47
Sir Francis Bacon's account of it . . . 98
Poictou, insurrection at . - - - ... 6
Politeness, affectation of . - - - -
Politicians, the distinction scarce discernible

between them and idiots . -
City reprover . . . . . . 155
Politics universally prevail . . . 232
Polypragmon, character of a cunning fellow .191

Pompey, a black boy, his complaint . . . 245
Pope, the, sick of the tooth-ache . . - . 129
In distress . - - - - . 5, 6, 7
His modesty overcome with regard to the
Neapolitan horses . . . . .
Postman, the extraordinary talent of the author
of the . . . . . . . . 178
Posture-master, his beholders censured . . 108
Polatrix, (Elizabeth) catalogue of her ancestors 35
Poverty, an attendant on Tyranny 16s
Powell (junior) a famous actor . - - . 15
Disputes between him and Mr. Bickerstaff
44, 50, 115
Why he locked up the legs of his company . 143
An excuse for writing against him . . 51
Letter from Bath . . . . . . . 50
Power, absolute, represented in a dance . . . 10
Praise, true, generous and heroic spirits most
sensible of it . - - - - -
How coveted by great men . . - -
To be regarded only as relating to things
strictly true - - - - - -
None valuable but from the praise-worthy .177
Prayer of lord chancellor Bacon . . . . 267
Prad-Adamites threatened . . . . . 69
Precedence, a quarrel concerning, at the opera 16
At Epsom - - - - - . 36
Preliminaries of peace . . . 20
Refused by the French king . . . . 23, 24
Pretenders to poetry, a kind of madmen . . 147
Pretty fellow, who . . . . . 21
What persons excluded that order - -
Very pretty fellow, a woman's man in the
first degree - - - - - . 24
Pride, the cause and consequences of . . 127
Makes men odious, and creates envy . . . 186
A remarkable 1:..sance of it in a cobbler . 127
The chief introduction to madness - . 127
Prio sthood, when the highest honour - . 68
Prim, (Penelope) the clear-starcher, her petition 118
Prize-fighting, a reproach to the English na-

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tion . - - - - - - ... 1
Proctorstaff. (Mr.) admitted Mr. Bickerstaff's

kinsman . - - - - - . 270
Prodicus, an allegory by . 97

Prophets, modern, reflections on their character 11
• Account of a comedy so called . - -
Propriety in words and thoughts explained . 62
Protestants, wherein superior to Papists . . 155
Prudence in women the same as wisdom in men 172
Prudes, a name for courtly hypocrites . ... 102
Distinguished from coqueties . . . 126
What part they bear in a female consort 157
Public spirit, the most essential quality in a
statesman . - - - - . 194
The first motive to all actions. . . . 183
A great instance of it in Regulus . . . 183

No. No.
Punchinello, his origin, character, and ill-man- Ruffs, wherein necessary . . . . . . . 118
iners . - - * - - - 45, 115 To be worn with the sardingale . - . 118
Rival to Nicolini . - - - - . I lo i Rural wits - - - - - . 153
Disposed of . - - 21)
Terre Filius at Oxford . - - - . .45 SACHARIssa, an excellent young lady, why not
Punctuality a suspicious circumstance in visiting 109 courted " - - - - - ... 5
Punning, an enormity - - - - 32 Sagissa, her intrigue discovered by a pinch of
An instance of - - . . . . 35 snuff . - - - - - - -
Puppets, Mr. Powel's, whence taken . 115 Sallust, wherein partial . . . . . 62, 81
Puppet-show supplies the want of an act at Saltero, (Don) at Chelsea, his descent, qualifica-
xi or - - - - - - 45 tions, and relics . - - - - -
Mrs. Saraband's in the Exchange . 20 Cases referred to him . - - . 195
Purgatory believed by the Platonists - . 154 A curiosity in his museum . - - . 226
Puzzlepost, (Ned) how improved in writing . 112 || Sandford the player, what parts he acted well. 134
Pyrrhus, (king) reproved by a philosopher . 202 Sappho, a fine lo, her discourse with Mr.
Pythagoras, apophthegm of . . . . 214 Bickerstaff. . . . . . . 5
One of his golden sayings , 108 so (Mrs.) her puppet-show in the Ex-
- change - - - - - - . 20
QUAck doctors, their artifices . 240 Satire, in what cases uscsu! . - - . 61
Great friends to upholders . .261 When just must be dictated by good nature . 242
Quality, the weakness of persons of 180 The ordinary subjects for . . . . . 242
Should always pay the reckoning . 45 Apology for it by Shakspeare - - ... 4
Quarrel at Epsom about precedence . 36 Satirists censured when they depreciate human
Matrimonial, prevented . - - 35 nature - - - - - - ... 108
Questioners described . . . . . . . 41 || Censures on the vain pretenders to that title. 242
Quidnunc, his character of laziness . - . 10 Satisfaction, a term in dielling, explained ... 2
Quixote, (Don) the first symptoms of his mad- Scaevola, his fortitude imitated by a slave on
Isless . - - - - - - . 178 the stage . - - - - - . 177
- Scales for weighing injuries 250
Raffling-shop kept by a lawyer at Hampstead 59 Scandal, a universal thirst after . 164
Ragouts prejudicial to the stomach - 48 Scholar, many pretenders to that title . 197
Rakes characterised . - - 27 Scipio, his generous treatment of a captive lady 158
Midnight, advice to - - 143 Scoggin, (Mr.) what Mr. Bickerstaff claims
Ralph Shallow the fine speaker - - . 197 through him - - - - - . 9
Ranter, (colonel) civilized at the sight of lady Scold described . . . . . - . 217
Betty Modish . . . . . . . 10 What usually makes women scolds . . 217
Rape, trials for, mostly attended by women 84 Defence of one at Billingsgate - - . .204
Rapin, his observations on the English theatre. 134 Scolding, a great enemy to women's features .. 217
Rapine, an attendant on licentiousness 161 Reinedies for . - . . . - - , 221
Rattlesnake, artifice of . - - - 145 || Scorn, the cause of laughter . - - . 63
Read, (sir William) an eminent oculist . 145 || Scotland, simplicity declining there . - . 144
Reading, the exercise of the mind . . 147 Scotus, his way of distinguishing mankind . 174
Recipe of Mr. Bickerstaff. - - - . 240 Screens, who . - - - - - . 17
Reconsiderations on Instructions to Vanderbank, Scriptures, the style of them more than human 233
a poem - - - - - - ... 3 Reading them attended with great pleasure , 233
Recreations, the advantage of . - - 248 || Scudamore, (sir) in Spenser, his adventures trans-
Recruiting Officer, a comedy, character of 20 posed . - - - - - - . 194
Regulus, a great instance of public spirit . 183 Seignior, (grand) sets all his Christian slaves at
Religion, a prayer for the advancement of 5 liberty - - - - - ... 6
Great Britain particularly iruitful in religions 257 Scity, what . . . - - - . 174
Religious war discussed . - - - . 155 | Self-regard, when most contemptible . 190
Reptile, (Dick) a member of the Sheer-lane Club, Sempronia, (lady) her scheme to betray Jenny
his character - - - - - 132 istaff. - - - - - - . 33
His reflections on the abuse of speech . 137 Seneca, moderate in great fortune . . . 170
Reputation, the only just means of obtaining and Senecio, the character of a good-natured old
establishing it . - - - . 186, 191 Ianan . - - - - - - . 45
Respect only to be procured by obligations 180 Serenade, condemned - - - - - . .222
Retirement requires greater talents than busi- Serpents, who to be accounted such in conversa-
ness . - - - - - - . 249 tion . - - - - - . 88
Revenge of two French ladies on a Gascon 125 Settlements, marriage, their ill effects . .223
Richard III. effects of reading that tragedy 90 Rules for drawing them up . - - . 223
Richards, (major-general) blown up by a mine A settlement drawn up by Mr. Bickerstaff 199
at Alicant . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Sexes, comparative perfections of . . 17.2
Riches, the use and abuse of them . . 57 In souls .. - - - - . 172
Ridicule, the ill effects of . - - - 219 Shakspeare, his excellencies - - 8, 6.8
How to be used - - 63 His mind seasoned with religion . - . . . .
When the effect of reason - 63 His apology for satire . - - . 41
Riding, a healthy exercise - - - 248 || Why his plays should he encouraged ... 8
Contributes to beauty . - - - . 218 Shallow, (Ralph) the fine speaker 197
Rigid, the, an untractable race of mortals to be Sir Timothy, a customer to the toyman . 142
found in all parties . - - - . 214 Sharpers represented by a parcel of dogs. . 59
Ring, invisible . - - . . 138, 139 Their character and reception - 56
Risibility the effect of reason . - - . 63 Their practices at Bath . - - 65.
Rochefoucault, his writings censured - 108 Defended - - - - - . 57
Rochford, (earl of) killed . - - - 210 | Sheep-biter, why a term of reproach . 148
Roman ladies, of their general virtue - . 122 Shield of love ... . - - - - . 194
Romps, how cured . - - - : . 269 Shilling, adventures of a . . . - - . 249
Rosin, (Will) the Wapping fiddler, history of . 108 || Show in Germany described, representing the
Royal Society, actions censured - . 230 religions of Great Britain - -

No.

Shrove-Tuesday, persecution of cocks con-
demned - - - - . 134
Sibourg, (colonel) death of 21
Sieve, mathematical, to sist impertinences 51
Signs, remarks on - - - ... 8
Silence, instances of its insignificancy . 133

Simplex munditiis, the meaning of those terms. 212

Sumulation distinguished from dissimulation . 213
Sippet, (11arry) an expert wine-brewer . 134
Slattern described in bed . - - . 243
Snart fellow described . - 20
Whether an affront to be called so 28
Smile, a man made mad with half a-one . 5()
Smith, (Dr.) Mr. Bickerstasi's corn-cutter . ... 103
Cases referred to him . - - - . 193
Smyrna coffee-house recommended for music,
poetry, and politics . - - - . 78
Snapdragon illustrated . . 85
Snuff, how and when to be offered . 197
Taking ot, censured . . - - 35
Boxes, a new edition of - - 142
Society, the pleasure of described by Milton . 114

Socrates, his allegory of the origin of love -
His behaviour at the Athenian theatre . . 122

His doctrines . - - - - 135
Softly, (Ned) a pretty poet, sonnet by 163
Sorrow, expressed by Shakspeare . 47

A saving of Epictetus concerning it - . 397
- -- | c

Soul, human, considered . , . . . 87
South, (i)r.) character of his sermons - . 205
Quotations from . - - - . 205, 214
Spa water, design of the coquettes to bring it up 107
Speaking, what manner most offensive . . 92
Speech in its greatest perfection in an accom-
plished woman . - - - - . 60
Reflections on the abuse of it . . 92, 137
Spenser, the tenth canto of his fourth book trans-
- posed . - - - - - - ... 104
Spindle, (Tom) how cured of the spleen . 47
Spleen, its effects - - - - . 180
A never-failing remedy for it . . 47, 80
Squibs, a branch of gunners, who to be so ac-
counted . . . . . . 88
Squires, country, described . . . . 96
Staff of Life, his poem on the French king 24

Stage or theatre, the use of . - - . 182
Stanhope, (general) wounded . - . 210, 212
A query concerning - - - -
Stanwix, (general) his behaviour at Badajos
Staremberg, (general) beats the army of the duke

of Anjou . - - - - 74
Takes Balaguier . . . - - - . 76
Statesman, what quality most essential to one . 194
State weather-glass, description and use of 214
Statira, account of her distress . - . 128
Steele, (Mr.) his acknowledgement . - . 271
Stentor, a singer at St. Paul's reproved 54
Injuries done by his bawling. - . 54
Admonished by one at St. Peter's . 61
184

Stocking, the custom of throwing it at weddings

Stone-walls, comment on them 17

Story-tellers, bagpipes in conversation . . . 153

Tedious . - - - - - . 132, 264

A project for suppressing them . - . 268
To: employment in Mr. Bickerstaff's Bed-

d • . 174

in . . - - -
Style depraved by modern writers

Of the scriptures inore than human - . 233

Subline in writing, instanced in a simile in the
Campaign . - - -

Summer-house described . -- - . 179, 189
The plan of one defended . . . . 203
Supper, encroachments on - - - . .263
Supple, the, a compound in all parties . . 214
Swearers, how reformed . - - . 13
Swearing, a folly without temptation . . . 137
Sweden, king of passes the Nieper . . . . 24
Success against the Muscovites . . 25, 28
Defeated . • . . . 49, 55, 58

- No.
Switzerland, prospect of . . . . 93
TABLE, who keeps the best . . - 148

Qf respect and intimacy - - - -
Tale-bearers, the use of them in Mr. Bicker-
staff’s Bedlam . - - - - ... 2
Taliacotius, account of his cures - - -
Talkativeness, a sign of soliy and ill-breeding .

Taste of an age known by plays - - 42
Tea not used in the time ori - 148
Telemachus, his discoveries in the regions of
the dead . - - - - - . 156
Temper, command of it the greatest human per-
section - - - - - . 17
Temperance, preservative of health . - . 240
Temple of Avarice - - - - . 123
Of Honour . - - - - 123
Of Hymen . - - - - 120
Os Love, by Spenser . . . 194
Of Lust . . . . . . . . . 120
Of Vanity - - - - - 123
Of Virtue . . . . . . . . 123
Tenderness inspired by the muses . . . 98
No true greatness of mind without it . 98

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Theatres, useful - - - - 7, 99
Make a polite and moral gentry 8
English, censured . - - - - 134
Thorold, (sir George) declared alderman . 11
Timoleon, on honour and title . - - . 171

Tinigret, (Tom) the vintner, instances of his art
in colouring liquors - - - . 131
Tiptoe, (Tom) a stage-coach to his dancing-

school advertised - - - 180
Tiresias, advice of to Ulysses . . . 152
Tirewomen, their ignorance . - . 212
Titles, the significancy and abuse of. . 17. I
The importinent use of . - - - . 204
Title, (sir Timothy) a profound critic, quarrels
with his mistress . . . - . 165
Toasts, a new religious order in England. • 129
Origin of that institution - - . 24
By whom the name found out - - . 31
Torcy, (Mons.) French plenipotentiary 9, 13, 19,
21, 2
Letter to him from madam Maintenon . 19
His sense of the greatness of France . . . 16
Tories, a new religious order in England . . 1:9
Tournay invested . - - - - . 35
Bravery of the besiegers there . . 59
Sirrrendered . - - - . 44, 62
Town, observations on . - - - . 83
Ladies reproved . - - - - . 210
Orators described - - . 244
Poets, full of rules . - - . 244

Townsend, (lord) the English plenipotentiary . 18

Toys, by whom brought into fashion - . 142

|Tridesmen, when they deserve the title of
gentlemen . -

Tragedy, materials for making one . 22
Passion of, how to be expressed 47
Transitions illustrated - 67
Travel, useless to man - - 93
Will not make a foos a wise man . 93
Treaty of peace broken off - - - , 23
Trippet, (sir Taffety's) his amour at Epsom and
, Tonbridge . - - - - . . . 47
Trip to the Jubilee, a comedy . - - . 19
Tristram, (sir) the banker, character o - . 57
Triumphs abused by the Romans with regard to
captives . - - - - - . 63
Trubies, character of that family . . . 63
Trueman, (Tom) a hero in domestic life . 213
Trump's, (Tom) defence of gamesters and
sharpers . - - - - - 57
Trumpet, a species of men in conversation is 3
Club in Sheer-lane - - o:

Trusty, (Sam) his visits to two old widows

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No. no.
Tulips, variety of names to . . . . 218 War-horse to be let . . . " ... 64
Tunbridge Wells, adventures and diversions at 47 Watch invented for the use of clubs . 264
Tweezer-cases, incomparable, where sold . 142|Water, circumspection - - 2, 34
Tyranny, commands an army against the region Wax-work in Germany . . . . . 257
oil. . . . . . . . . . 161 | Wealth, a distinction only in traffic. . 203

Wealthy persons fix characters and wit to cir-
WAFER, (Will) his speech concerning sharpers. 56 cumstances . . . . . . 57
Valentine, a soldier, story of . . . 5 | Weather-glass, state . - . 214
Valetudinarians, the order of - - 77 | Wedlock, picture of . - ... 7
Vanity of birth, the greatest under the sun 11 Welch a nation of gentlemen . . . .31
Varilas, happy in the possession of modesty 52 || Harp, an instrument in a female concert . 157
Warmish, (Tom) his adventure with a merchant's Whetters reproved . - - - . 138, 141
wise . . . . . . . . 136 | Whigs, a religious order in England. . 129
Veal a modern diet . - - - - . 148 || Whisperers, censured - - - - . 38
Verus, the character of an impartial chief justice Whitaker's, (admiral) arrival at Barcelona 5
(Holt). - - - - - - - Widowhood, male, considered . - . 114

Vicissitudes of human life considered . 170 || Wife, the most amiable term in life, and derided

Vignolles, (major) death of 21 only by fools - - - - -

villaria, the beauteous object ofOrlando's affec.
tions

Violins, a species of men in conversation. 153. 157
Virgil compared with Homer . . . 6
More judicious in his epithets

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His i. * - - - - - -
His writings leave the mind composed . -
Virginal, who so accounted in female conversa-

tion . - - - - - . 157
Virginity, how properly to be dated . . 210
Virtue of a beautiful nature . - . 97
Heroic, wherein it consists . 202
In common life 87, 213

Virtuosi, ridiculous studies of .

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Scheme to govern one . - - - ... 10
Infallible sign of wives loving their husbands 104
Wildair, (Tom) how reformed by his father

Wilks, the comedian, his excellencies 112
William III. of England, eulogium on -
Will's Coffee-house - - - 1
Window-breakers with halfpence - . 77
Wine, to whom and when to be allowed . . 252
Present of, to Mr. Bickerstaff 147, 181
Adulteration of . - - . 131
Brewers, the fraternity of tried - 131
A request to them . - - - - . 131
Winter-gardens described and recommended . 17
Winter-piece, by Mr. Philips . l

Wisdom, (Walter) character of, and manner of

courtship - 98
Wit, definitions of 62
Local . . -" - 57
Adventitious . - - 251-
Judged by men's purses. - 57 -
Wits opposed to critics . . 29
Bodily wits - - - - - 45
Professed wits, silly and troublesome . 213
Withers, (general) character of . - 46
Witchcraft described and explained . . 21
Women have not the allowances men make for
themselves. - - - - - -
The villany of deluding them exposed . . 201
The happiness of mankind depends on their
education - - - - - . J41
Want regular education - - - 61
Natural to them to talk of themselves . ... 10
Of the present age, compared with those of
the last - - - - - * *
More subtle than men in their own affairs 30
Their common sailing . . . .247
Bad taste in dress . - - . 151
Unmarried, instructions to the . 184

Wren, (sir Christopher) described under the
name of Nestor . - - - . 52

WAGs, the lowest pretenders to wit . . 184. XERYes, why he burst into tears 97.
Waiting maids, a petition from them. . 136
War, religious, discussed . - . 1551 YouNg, (Margery) life and adventures of. . 226.

t - -

THE END.

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