The Elements of Physics: A College Text-book, Volume 1

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Page 33 - Every body continues in its state of rest or of uniform motion in a straight line, except in so far as it may be compelled by impressed forces to change that state.
Page 224 - Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall: Humpty Dumpty had a great fall. All the King's horses and all the King's men Couldn't put Humpty Dumpty in his place again." "That last line is much too long for the poetry," she added, almost out loud, forgetting that Humpty Dumpty would hear her.
Page 194 - Pressure of mixed gases. — When two or more gases are mixed in a vessel, the total pressure is equal to the sum of the pressures which each component gas would exert if it occupied the vessel alone (Dalton's Law). For example, if the amount of air in a vessel is such that it alone would exert a pressure p and if the amount of water vapor in the vessel is such that it alone would exert a pressure w, then the mixture will exert a pressure p...
Page 291 - In a word, the Elements of Physics is a book which has been written for use in such institutions as give their undergraduates a reasonably good mathematical training. It is intended for teachers who desire to treat their subject as an exact science, and who are prepared to supplement the brief subject-matter of the text by demonstration, illustratIon, and discussion drawn from the fund of their own knowledge. THE MACMILLAN COMPANY, 66 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK.
Page 199 - A, and the adjacent angular points of the squares joined, the sum of the squares of the three joining lines is equal to three times the sum of the squares of the sides of the triangle.
Page 291 - ... manuals of physics. No attempt has been made in this work to produce a complete manual or compendium of experimental physics. The book is planned to be used in connection with illustrated lectures, in the course of which the phenomena are demonstrated and described. The authors have accordingly confined themselves to a statement of principles, leaving the lecturer to bring to notice the phenomena based upon them. In stating these principles, free use has been made of the calculus, but no demand...
Page 291 - ... a work of a grade intermediate between that of the existing elementary texts and the advanced manuals of physics. No attempt has been made in this work to produce a complete manual or compendium of experimental physics. The book is planned to be used in connection with illustrated lectures, in the course of which the phenomena are demonstrated and described. The authors have accordingly confined themselves to a statement of principles, leaving the lecturer to bring to notice the phenomena based...
Page 292 - The work as a whole cannot be too highly commended. Its brief outlines of the various experiments are very satisfactory, its descriptions of apparatus are excellent ; its numerous suggestions are calculated to develop the thinking and reasoning powers of the student. The diagrams are carefully prepared, and its frequent citations of original sources of information are of the greatest value.
Page 292 - The first volume, intended for beginners, affords explicit directions adapted to a modern laboratory, together with demonstrations and elementary statements of principles. It is assumed that the student possesses some knowledge of analytical geometry and of the calculus. In the second volume more is left to the individual effort and to the maturer intelligence of the practicant. A...
Page 198 - Law. A mixture of gases having no chemical action on each other exerts a pressure which is the sum of the pressures which would be exerted by each component gas separately if it occupied the containing vessel alone at the given temperature.

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