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As there is need therefore of reason to move and incite reason, so is there of perfect reason to incite perfect reason.

They are said to profit a man, who give or procure for him money, favour, safety, and the like things, that are estimable and necessary for the uses of life; and herein even a fool may profit a wise man: but to be of real benefit, is for a man to move the mind of another according to the nature and fitness of things ; either by his own virtue, or by the virtue of the person moved; and this cannot be done without the good even of the person who confers the benefit; for it is necessary that in exercising another's virtue, he must exercise his own.

But waving these things which are undoubtedly the chief good, or efficients of the fame, a wise man may nevertheless profit a wise man in other.respects; for only to meet with a wise man is of itself a desirable thing to another ; because good naturally delighteth itself in good (a), and consequently every good man is as pleased with a good man as with himself.

But I must necessarily, for argument's sake, pass from this to another question; for it is asked, whether a wise man will deliberate upon asking the opinion of another concerning his duty in civil and domestic (if I may so say) mortal affairs ? Undoubtedly, as, in this respect, there is as much need of the counsel of another, as there is occasionally of a physician, of a pilot, of an advocate or proctor: therefore a wise man may be of service to a wise man, in that he will counsel and persuade him; but it is in those great and divine things before spoken of, wherein he will

particularly affist him, by conferring on the reason of things, and by communicating their minds and thoughts to each other.

Moreover, it is agreeable to Nature or the fitness of things, to embrace our friends with sincerity, and to rejoice as much in their good actions as in our own; or else we should be wanting in that virtue, which in exercising itself grows splendid by use. Now, virtue perfuades us to settle and dispose well of things present; to consult and A wise man will be of service to a wise man, not only by his own strength and powers, but even by those of him whom he assists. He indeed being left to himself is able to maintain his own part, and discharge his duty: he will exert his own speed: yet nevertheless he that only encourageth another in running, aslifts him. Nor does a wise man only benefit another, but likewise himself. You will say perhaps, bet a man fufpend his own natural powers, and he does nothing. You might as well say there is no sweetness in lioney. For he that cateth it, must be so qualified in tongue and palate, as to relish, and not be offended at, the taste of it. For to the sick, such

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be the nature of the disease, as to make honey seem bitter. Each of them therefore must be such, as that the one is qualified to instruct, and the other to seceive instruction.

But you reply, As it is in vain to beat a thing that is extremely hot, so is it to pretend to add goodness to one who is superlatively good. Does the busbandman who thoroughly understands his business go to another for instruction? Or does a soldier, when sufficiently equipped for battle, require more arms? Therefore neither does the wise man ask any thing, for he is already sufficiently instructed, and suficiently armed against the perils of life. He that is excessively hot, need not any thing more to warm him: the heat is suficient for itself. Now to this I answer,

First, the things here compared by no means agree. For heat is simply one thing; but there are various ways of benefiting one another. And then heat, as heat, is not necessarily assisted by any accession of heat : but the wise man cannot maintain and keep up the spirit of his mind, unless he admits some friends like himself, with whom he may communicate his virtues. Add now, that there is a certain friendship and connection between all virtues; he thierefore is of service, who loves the virtues of other men that are like his own; and in his turn exhibits his own to be esteemed and beloved by them. Like things give delight; especially if they are just; and men know how both to approve and be approved. None but a wise man can skilfully move the mind of a wise man; as nothing but man can rationally move man.

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As there is need therefore of reason to move and incite reason, fo is there of perfect reason to incite perfect reason.

They are said to profit a man, who give or procure for him money, favour, safety, and the like things, that are estimable and necessary for the uses of life; and herein even a fool may profit a wise man: but to be of real benefit, is for a man to move the mind of another according to the nature and fitness of things ; either by his own virtue, or by the virtue of the perfon moved; and this cannot be done without the good even of the person who confers the benefit; for it is necessary that in exercising another's virtue, he must exercise his own.

But waving these things which are undoubtedly the chief good, or efficients of the fame, a wife man may nevertheless profit a wise man in other.respects; for only to meet with a wise man is of itself a desirable thing to another ; because good naturally delighteth itself in good (a), and consequently every good man is as pleased with a good man as with himself.

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But I must necessarily, for argument's fake, pass from this to another question; for it is asked, whether a wise man will deliberate upon asking the opinion of another concerning his duty in civil and domestic (if I may so say) mortal affairs? Undoubtedly, as, in this respect, there is as much need of the counsel of another, as there is occasionally of a physician, of a pilot, of an advocate or proctor : therefore a wise man may be of fervice to a wise man, in that he will counsel and persuade him; but it is in those great and divine things before spoken of, wherein he will pasticularly assist him, by conferring on the reason of things, and by communicating their minds and thoughts to each other.

Moreover, it is agreeable to Nature or the fitness of things, to embrace our friends with sincerity, and to rejoice as much in their good actions as in our own; or else we should be wanting in that virtue, which in exercising itself grows splendid by use. Now, virtue perfuades us to settle and dispose well of things present; to consult and vide for the future; to deliberate and apply the mind to study, with care and diligence: but much easier will a man do all this, and unfold his faculties, who hath taken to himself a proper friend: he therefore looks out for one that is perfect; or at least who hath made such proficiency as to be almost perfect; and herein will such a one assist him, by the rules of common prudence.

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It is said, that men generally fee more in other men's affairs than in their own ; and this certainly happens to those who are blinded by Self-love, and who, through a suspicion of danger, see not their own interest: when a man is more secure and fearleis he will become wiser. But yet there are some things, which even wise men can see better in others than in themselves. Besides, a wise man will cause another to will, or not will the same thing (b), which is ever of the greatest consequence, most delightful, just and proper.

In the discharge of duty an excellent work! they will always draw together.

Thus then, I hope, I have fully answered your request, though this matter is discussed in its proper place; and comprized in those books wherein I have considered the whole of moral philosophy. But after all, Lucilius, think upon what I have often said to you, that in these matters we do nothing more than exercise our ingenuity. For I must repeat it again, and suppose you here to say, " Of what real service are “ these dry subjects? Will they make a man stronger, more just, or

more temperate ? I am not at leisure to be exercised in these super“ ficial matters; I as yet want a physician. Why do you teach me

an unprofitable science ? You promised me great things, but enter“ tain me with trifles. You undertook to make me intrepid, though “ swords were fourished over my head; nay, though a dagger was

pointed to my throat. You said I thould be secure, though fire

raged around me; and my little bark were by a sudden whirlwind • hurried into the wide and boisterous ocean: make good your prosmise; teach me to contemn pleasure, to despise glory; and then, « afterwards, if you please, instruct me, to solve the most intricate

questions; to distinguish ambiguities, to investigate things dark and ** obscure ; at present, I shall be content with learning what is necessary.”

ANNO.

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Ως αι τον όμοιον άγα θεός ώι τον ομοιον. Οd. p. 218.
Heav'n with a secret principle endu'd
Mankind to seek their own fimilitude. Pope.
Τιτ]ις μίν τεττιγι φιλος, μυρμακι δε μυρμαξ. Τheocr. 9»
To grasshoppers the grasshoppers are friends,
And ant on ant for mutual aid depends.
Asi monoids após no2018v if ávet. Prov.
Γερων γεροντι γλταν ήδισταν έχει
Πάις παιδί, και γυνακι προςοφορον γυνή,

Νοσών τ' ανήρ νοσέντι. κ. α. λ. ap. Ρlut.
Lar. Pares cum paribus. Æqualis æqualem delectat. Erasm. I. č. zo.
Simile gaudet simili. Ib. 21. Cascus cascum ducit, &c.

Indica 'Tigris agit rabida cum tygride pacem
Perpetuam. Sævis inter fe convenit ursis. Juv. xv. 263-
Tyger with tyger, bear with bear you'll

find,
In leagues offenfive and defenfive join'd. Tate.
And yet, says Martial,

Uxor pessima peffimus maritus!
Miror non bene convenire vobis.
Bad busband and bad wife! 'tis strange to mt,

That two, so much alike, cannot agree.
The Italians say, Ogni simile appetisee il suo simile. The French, Chescun cherche fon femra
bable, or, demande sa sorte. The English, Like will to like, (as the devil said to the collier.)
King Harry (V.) loved a man, &c.

(6) Minutius in O&avio, ut et in ludicris et seriis pari mecum voluntate concineret, eadem vellet: et vollet crederes unam mentem in duobus fuisse divisam. Vid. Sidon. Apoll. v.9.

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I SALUTE thee, Lucilius, from my country-seat at Nomentum; and charge thee to keep thy mind ever pure; i. e. to have the Gods propitious to you; as they are ever kind to those, who are kind to them

selves,

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