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114. Sunday Evening.....

............... Anon. 285

115. The Artist's Wife's Album .....

ISIS viie s Album ...................... Howoitt. 287

116. Susquehanna............

..........Mrs. Ellet. 290

117. Female Courage......

......Lady Stanhope. 292

118. Grace Darling .........

........ Wordsworth. 293

119. Monody on the Death of Grace Darling..Mrs. C. B. Wilson. 295

120. Female Studies......

.......Mrs. Barbauld. 296

121. Shocking lgnorance ...

.......... Anon. 298

122. Edgeworthstown........................ Mrs. S. C. Hall. 300

123. Mysteries of Life.....

....... Orville Dewey. 303

124. Scene from Miriam....

..... Mrs. E. P. Hał. 305

125. London ........

......... Anon. 310

126. French Politeness..........

... Saint-Simon. 313

127. Pilgrims of the Middle Ages....

......... Anon. 316

128. Autumnal Musings.....

... Anna M. Wells. 319

129. The Ocean.

........... Greenwood. 320

130. Ode to the Flowers ....

........ Horace Smith. 322

131. The Besieged Castle..

............. Scott. 324

132. Same Subject ......

............... Ibid. 328

133. Ship by Moonlight ...

......... Wilson. 331

134. Beauty ......... .................

R. W. Emerson. 334

135. The Flower-Stealers ......................... Blanchard

1. 336

136. Qualities requisite in a Wife .................. Dr. Aikin. 339

137. Love for Humanity ......................... Mrs. Child.

d. 341

138. A Quaker Meeting ............ .............. Lamb. 343

139. Song for August .....

.........H. Martineau. 345

140. Literature and Morals...........

........ Frisbie. 346

141. Birthplace of Burns .....

.....Cunningham. 349

142. The Éttrick Shepherd's Mother .... ....... Anon. 350

143. Ladies' Head-Dresses.......

......Addison. 352

144. Domestic Education........ ..........Mrs. Gilman. 355

145. The Water-Lily.......

.... Mrs. Hemans. 358

146. Stanzas on the Death of Mrs. Hemans...... Miss Landon. 359

147. The Dying Midshipman.......................... Anon.

148. The Departed .......

....Mary Ann Brown.

149. "I see Thee still"..................... Charles Sprague.

150. A Dirge.........................................Moir. 367

151. The Guelphs and Ghibelines.... ........Da Ponte. 369

152. The Mosque of Santa Sophia.... ..... Miss Pardoe. 372

153

Scene from “ As You Like It ”..

Shakspeare. 375

154. Sabbath Musings...........

...... H. Martineau. 376

155. A Connecticut Farm-House.............. Mrs. Sigourney. 378

156. Connecticut.....

......ld. 381

157. Particular People ................................ Anon. 382

158. The Grandam ..

.............................. Lamb. 385

159. Cottage Names ..... ............... Miss Mitford. 386

160. The Brides of Venice

389

161. Same Subject .................................... Ibid. 391

162. Light.....

......... Anon. 392

163. To a Little Cloud..

164. Cultivation of Taste ...... .............

165. December.......

........... Howitt. 3998

166. The Deserted Home....

........... Tennyson. 401

.... ...Mrs. Jameson. 401

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366

394

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396

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168. The Mother of Washington ..

.Mrs. Sigourncy. 444

169. Female Sentimentalists...................Mrs. Sandforid. 405

170. The Lover's Echo ............................... Anon. 407

171. Moravian Funerals............................... Anon. 468

172. Footsteps of Angels......................... Longfellow. 411

173. Dreams ....

..................... Addison. 412

174. May Fashions.........

................. Anon. 414

175. Song of the Shirt....

.............Hood. 418

176. Frederika Bremer...............

......... Anon. 421

177. Unlucky Days ....................... Frederika Bremer. 425

178. A Daughter's Wish........................ Montgomery. 429

179 English Compliments

Anon. 431

180. The Grave-Diggers..

S.....................

........... Dickens. 433

181. A Lesson to Reformers.......... ..........Mrs. Child. 436

182. Twilight ....... ..............

............. Mrs. Norton. 437

183. Elysium...

.................

.......... Mrs. Hemans. 438

184. The Existence of God ........

................ Fenelon. 441

185. Character of Fenelon .......... ............ Saint-Simon. 443

186. Gertrude's Retreat .......

1. 445

187. The Family Meeting.......... ...........Sprague. 448

188. The Acropolis and the Parthenon...

r. 449

189. Jephthah's Daughter ........

........ Willis. 453

190. Sublimity of Wordsworth........

ortn..................... Talfourd. 455

191. Ode

........

h. 456

192. Portia's Wooers ....

..... Shakspeare. 461

193. Frost at Midnight.......

..... Coleridge. 464

194. Character of Hannah More

.......... Roberts. 465

195. Female Accomplishments .... ...... Hannah More. 467

196. Dr. Johnson.........

....Madame D'Arblay. 468

197. Washing-Day .......

.. Mrs. Barbaulă. 471

198. Woman, in France.....

.......... Anon. 473

199. Anna Maria Porter

........ Anon. 475

200. The Women of France and of England......... Mirabeau. 477

201. Influence of Poetry on Women.......... ... Mrs. Ellis. 479

no

YOUNG LADIES'

ELOCUTIONARY READER.

PRINCIPLES OF ELOCUTION.

MANAGEMENT OF THE VOICE.

[The following observations on the management of the voice, are intended to be used as exercises in reading, as well as rules of elocution. One or more of the subjects indicated by the “captions,” may be taken up, as a daily lesson.]

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Few young ladies are aware how prevalent, even among the most cultivated of the sex, are some of the worst faults of utterance, as regards the "quality" of the voice. By “quality,” is meant the character which the voice assumes in individuals, in consequence of its peculiar sound, as more or less “pure” in tone, and therefore more or less agreeable to the ear. — A few preliminary observations on this subject, may prove serviceable, as aids to the correction or the formation of habit in this particular.

“Pure tone” is the designation used, in the science of music, for that perfectly vocalized and liquid quality of voice, which is free from murmur and from “ aspiration,” or the roughening effect of the breath escaping, in a whispering style, along with the sound, and audible apart from it. “Impure tone” is as much a fault in reading and in conversation, as in singing.

Willis, in his essay on “ unwritten music,” has placed the appropriate sound of the female voice among the most beautiful of its forms; and there is, unquestionably, a fine analogy between the sound of the running brook, the note of the wood-bird, the voice of a happy child, the low breathing of a flute, and the clear, soft tone

of a woman's voice, when it utters the natural music of home, -- the accents of gentleness and love.

To a well-tuned ear, there is a rich, deep melody in the distinctive bass of the male voice, in its subdued tones. But the key-note of poetry, seems to have been lent to woman. On the ear of infancy and childhood, her voice was meant to fall, as a winning prelude io all the other melodies of nature; the human nerves are attuned, accordingly, to the breath of her voice; and, through life, the chords of the heart respond most readily to her touch.

Yet how often is this result impeded by the processes of artificial culture, — by the over excitement of mind and nerve, attending excessive application, by that unwise neglect of health, and healthful action, which dims the eye and deadens the ear to beauty, and robs life of the joyous and sympathetic spirit which is native to childhood; and which, otherwise, would ever be gushing forth, in notes of gladness and endearment, — the physical not less than the moral charm of human utterance!

It is one of the serious errors of education, that amidst our innumerable processes for cultivating the intellect, we have so few for developing the sources of health and happiness; that the common results of education, are so meagre and unattractive, compared with the beauty and perfection of unmodified nature. The child has, usually, a full, sweet, and musical tone: the school girl, too often, a hollow pectoral murmur, of exhaustion or reserve; a shrill, sharp, and creaking note; a harsh, grating, guttural utterance, indicating an uncultivated taste, undisciplined emotions, and masculine habits; or, perhaps, a nasal twang, which addresses itself to the risible faculty ; a drawl, which even Patience on her monument, could not away with ; or a compressed dental articulation, escaping with difficulty from a half-shut mouth.

There are beautiful exceptions, undoubtedly, to this general fact of ungainly habit. But the ground of just complaint, is, that there is no provision made, in our systems of education, for the cultivation of one of woman's peculiar endowments, - an attractive voice. Our girls do not come home to us, after their period of school life, qualified to read with effect in their own language. Far from them seemns the power to realize the beautiful vision of fireside happiness, depicted by the muse of Mrs. Hemans, where,

“ Lips move tunefully along

Some glorious page of old.”

There is wanting, in their voices, that adaptation of tone to feeling, which is the music of the heart, in reading; there is wanting that clear, impressive style, which belongs to the utterance of cultivated taste and judgment, and which enhances every sentiment, by appropriate emphasis and pause; there is even a want of that distinct articulation, which alone can make sound the intelligible medium of thought

We evidently need some reforming measures in our modes of early culture for females, by which a vigorous, healthy, organic action, may be secured, as a habit of utterance. We need the aid of systematic training, in this particular, — a discipline, correspond

ing, in results, to the effects of that thorough practice in the elements 1 of vocal music, of which the schools of continental Europe, furnish

so beautiful examples. The organs of speech are evidently susceptible of the same practised excellence in execution, which distinguishes the cultivated from the uncultivated vocalist.

Identity of Musical and Elocutionary Culture. Dr. Rush's masterly analysis of the human voice, has rendered systematic training in this department practicable to diligence and study; and, in Philadelphia and Boston, there are establishments now expressly devoted to instruction and practice in the elements of vocal culture.

The opportunities thus afforded for the formation of the voice, are invaluable, for the purposes of elocution, and equally so, for the advantages of adequate training in the elements of vocal music; since whatever imparts power and pliancy of organ for the one, must be as useful for the other.

The production of pure and full tone, is the common ground on which elocution and vocal music unite, in elementary discipline. Both arts demand attention to appropriate healthful attitude, and to free, expansive, energetic action in the organs. Both require erect posture, free opening of the chest, full and regular breathing, power of producing and sustaining any degree of volume of voice, and, along with these, the habit of vivid, distinct, articulation. Both equally forbid that imperfect and laborious breathing, which mars the voice, exhausts the organs, and produces disease. Both tend to secure that healthy vigour of organ, which makes vocal exercise, at once, a source of pleasure, and a source of health.

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