The first (second) book of Cowper's Task, with notes by C.P. Mason

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Page 7 - Nor rural sights alone, but rural sounds, Exhilarate the spirit, and restore The tone of languid Nature.— Mighty winds, That sweep the skirt of some far-spreading wood Of ancient growth, make music not unlike The dash of ocean on his winding shore, And lull the spirit, while they fill the mind ; Unnumbered branches waving in the blast, And all their leaves fast fluttering, all at once.
Page 6 - How oft upon yon eminence our pace Has slackened to a pause, and we have borne The ruffling wind, scarce conscious that it blew, While Admiration, feeding at the eye, And still unsated, dwelt upon the scene.
Page 57 - Stellar Universe — The Tides — Colour — Common Things : Man — Magnifying Glasses — Instinct and Intelligence — The Solar Microscope — -The Camera Lucida— The Magic Lantern— The Camera Obscura — The Microscope — The White Ants : their Manners and Habits — The Surface of the Earth, or First Notions of Geography — Science and Poetry — The Bee — Steam Navigation — Electro-Motive Power— Thunder, Lightning, and the Aurora Borealis — The Printing Press— The Crust of...
Page 17 - Her fancy followed him through foaming waves To distant shores, and she would sit and weep At what a sailor suffers ; fancy, too, Delusive most where warmest wishes are, Would oft anticipate his glad return, And dream of transports she was not to know.
Page 10 - Here the grey smooth trunks Of ash, or lime, or beech, distinctly shine, Within the twilight of their distant shades ; There lost behind a rising ground, the wood Seems sunk, and shorten'd to its topmost boughs. No tree in all the grove but has its charms, Though each its hue peculiar...
Page 10 - Some glossy-leaved, and shining in the sun, The maple, and the beech of oily nuts Prolific, and the lime at dewy eve Diffusing odours : nor unnoted pass The sycamore, capricious in attire. Now green, now tawny, and ere autumn yet Have changed the woods, in scarlet honours bright.
Page 7 - Through the cleft rock, and chiming as they fall Upon loose pebbles, lose themselves at length In matted grass, that with a livelier green Betrays the secret of their silent course. Nature inanimate employs sweet sounds, But animated nature sweeter still, To soothe and satisfy the human ear.
Page 6 - The sloping land recedes into the clouds; Displaying on its varied side the grace Of hedge-row beauties numberless, square tower, Tall spire, from which the sound of cheerful bells Just undulates upon the listening ear; Groves, heaths, and smoking villages remote.
Page 2 - Time was, when clothing sumptuous or for use, Save their own painted skins, our sires had none. As yet black breeches were not ; satin smooth, Or velvet soft, or plush with shaggy pile...
Page 53 - GREENWOOD— THE ELEMENTS OF GREEK GRAMMAR, including Accidence, Irregular Verbs, and Principles of Derivation and Composition ; adapted to the System of Crude Forms. By JG GREENWOOD, Principal of Owens College, Manchester. New Edition. Crown 8vo.

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