A History of the Theology of the Disciples of Christ

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Christian Publishing Company, 1907 - 144 pages
 

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Page 61 - Let us then suppose the mind to be, as we say, white paper, void of all characters, without any ideas: — How comes it to be furnished? Whence comes it by that vast store which the busy and boundless fancy of man has painted on it with an almost endless varķerv? Whence has it all the materials of reason and knowledge? To this I answer, in one word, from EXPERIENCE.
Page 28 - Council approving, we teach and define that it is a dogma divinely revealed that the Roman Pontiff when he speaks ex Cathedra, that is, when in discharge of the office of Pastor and Doctor of all Christians, by virtue of his supreme apostolic authority he defines a doctrine regarding the faith or morals to be held by the Universal Church...
Page 61 - This source of ideas every man has wholly in himself; and though it be not sense, as having nothing "~, to do with external objects, yet it is very like it, and might properly enough be, called internal sense.
Page 61 - This great source of most of the ideas we have, depending wholly upon our senses, and derived by them to the understanding, I call sensation.
Page 60 - ... to examine our own abilities, and see what objects our understandings were, or were not, fitted to deal with.
Page 70 - ... eye has not seen, nor ear heard, neither has it entered into the heart of man to conceive, the things which God has prepared for them that love him; — nor yet, I may add, the wrath which he has prepared for those who do not love him.
Page 111 - We will, that this body die, be dissolved, and sink into union with the Body of Christ at large; for there is but one body, and one spirit, even as we are called in one hope of our calling.
Page 146 - Repent, and let every one of you be baptized in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins,' and you shall receive the gift of the Holy Spirit.
Page 61 - First, our senses, conversant about particular sensible objects do convey into the mind several distinct perceptions of things, according to those various ways wherein those objects do affect them: and thus we come by those ideas we have, of yellow, white, heat, cold, soft, hard, bitter, sweet, and all those which we call sensible qualities...
Page 60 - Were it fit to trouble thee with the history of this Essay, I should tell thee, that five or six friends meeting at my chamber, and discoursing on a subject very remote from this, found themselves quickly at a stand, by the difficulties that arose on every side.

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