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time is not mentioned. He was certainly have been bequeathed; for he says, Next that of Godhead with humanity.

he is said to have died of a fever at Lore

'Twas his intent That what his riches penn'd, poor Car shou His fate was wept by Cowley in a strai

Poet and Saint! To thee alone are given The two most sacred names of earth and he The hard and rarest union which can be *,

1652, for in that year his Carmen Deo Nos. Hymnus, &c., were published at Paris, by Thomas Car, to whom the poet's manuscrip

tenderness and enthusiasm.

Long did the Muses banish'd slaves abide,
And built their pyramids to human pride ;
Like Moses, thou, though spells and charms
Hast brought them nobly back to their Holy
Hail, Bard triumphant, and some care besto
On us, the poets militant below,
Oppos'd by our old enemy, adverse chance,
Attack'd by envy and by ignorance.
Thou, from low earth in nobler flames didstr

And like Elijah mount alive the skies. The few further particulars it is in my communicate respecting his manners and acqui are chiefly collected from the brief notices of Car, who boasts that “sweet Crashaw was his he Crasbaw's brother." He was well versed Hebrew, Greek, Latin, Spanish, and Italia guages, the two last of which he mastered alo

• Folio edition, 1669. This line cannot surely be correct. Cowley have written

The hardest, rarest, union whicb can be?

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guages, the two last of which be mastered almost by

kebanyo dowlod a fever at Loretto,
de é a match. He was certainly dead har
Idi tritar dis Carmen Deo Nastr, filho
ban, de pat pablished at Paris, by his friend
Mano la ndon the poet's manuscripts apart
ber kun degantied; for he says,

Parket des riches pennd, poor Car should priat
mens und enthusiasm.

Mared Saint! To thee alone are given
firme most sacred names of earth and bearen,
Nest that of Godhead with humanity.
Lag did the Muses banish d slares abide,
died built their pyramids to human pride;

Twas his intent
De band and rarest union which can be,

his own unaided efforts. The poets of Greece and Rome

were bis favourite study, and he quoted from them .. by memory, with singular readiness and exactness. His

accomplishments were on a par with his learning; he was skilled in music, drawing, engraving, and painting; and we learn from some verses, that he employed his talents for the amusement of his friends. The Sacred Poems printed at Paris in 1652, are adorned by some vignettes, “ first made with his own hand," and engraved, in one or two instances, with great spirit. The designs, indeed, like the poetry, are characteristic of the author. The picture illustrating the verses to the Countess of Denbigh, “persuading her to resolution in religion," represents a heart fastened by a heavy padlock; and the sorrow of Mary Magdalen is portrayed by a heart distilling drops of blood.

In his habits he was temperate, even to severity, taking no thought of the luxuries, scarcely of the necessaries of life. He lived, says his affectionate eulogist,

Above in the air,
A very bird of Paradise--no care
Had he of earthly trash ; what might suffice
To fit his soul for heavenly exercise,
Sufficed him
What he might eat or wear he took no thought,

His needful food he rather found than sought*. It has been supposed, from a passage in Selden's Table Talk, that he once entertained an intention of writing against the stage; but it is clear, from an Epigram upon two of Ford's tragedies, that he was at one period a student, if not an admirer, of the drama.

• Car's Prefatory verses to the Carmen Duo Nostro.

Like Hoses

, thou, though spells and charms wihstand,
Hest brought them nobly back to their Holy Land
Hol Bard triumphant, and some care bestow
On us, the poets militant below,
Opposid by our old enemy, adverse chance,
Attackid by envy and by ignorance. .
Thou, from low earth in nobler flames didst rise,

And like Elijah mount alive the skies.
The few further particulars it is in my power to
annunicaté respecting his manners and acquirements,
A chiefly collected from the brief notices of him by

who boasts that "sweet Crashaw was his friend, pe Crasbaw's brother." He was well versed in the Hebrew, Greek, Latin, Spanish, and Italian lan.

Folio edition, 1669. This live cannot surely be correct. Might bor Conley have written

The bardest, rarest, union which can be?

His secession from our Church is to be plored; but we have the zealous testimony that the virtues of his after-life did not a Mother whom he had forsaken.

Crashaw's poetical character has been dra siderable length, and with great ingenuity, E a letter to his friend, Henry Cromwell *.

It seems that my late mention of Crasha quotation from him, has moved your cu therefore, send you the whole author, who place among my other books of this nature years; in which time, having read him twice I find him one of those whose works may ju reading. I take this poet to have writ like a & regards design, form, fable (which is the soul of ceptions, fine metaphors, glittering expressio the dress, gems, or loose ornaments of poetry), other poetical writers of Miscellanics; nor can writes for diversion only.

that is at leisure hours, and more to keep ou ness than to establish a reputation; so that

or just can be expected from him. all that concerns exactness or consent of parts the body), will probably be wanting; only pre something of a neat cast of verse (which are found in these verses.

This is, indeed, the case be otherwise, since no man can be a true poc

These authors sho considered as versifiers and witty men rather te

and under this head will only fall the Tho the Expression, and the Numbers. These are o pleasing parts of poetry, which may be judged view, and comprehended all at once; and (to e

Literury Correspondence, vol. i., p. 302 ; 1735.

regular or

poets ;

.

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His een fan de Church is to be deals
Alread, det er bare te zealous testimony of Cork
Grativi petal character has been drawz at com
Atal hyd ad mith great ingenuity, by Pope, i
kter this friend, Henry Cromwell *.

Mests that my late mention of Crashaw, and a
granata how him, has moved your curiosity, 1,

Destino, kad for the whole author, who has held a
Itula ate of those whose works may just deserte

/ take this poet to have writ like a gentleman,
gut design, form, fable (which is the soul of poetry),
this concerns exactness or consent of parts (which is

establish a reputation; so that nothing

che gems, or loose ornaments of poetry), may be

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other books of this nature for sotke

rich time, having read him twice or thrie,

1

Marie leisure hours, and more to keep out of ide

myself like a painter) their colouring entertains the sight, but the lines and life of the picture are not to be inspected too narrowly.

"This author formed himself upon Petrarch, or rather upon Marino. His thoughts, one may observe, in the main, are pretty, but oftentimes far-fetched, and too often strained and stiffened, to make them appear the greater. For men are never so apt to think a thing great, as when it is odd or wonderful; and inconsiderate authors would rather be admired than understood. This ambition of surprising a reader is the true natural cause of all Fustian, or Bombast, in Poetry. To confirm what I have said, you need but look into his first poem of the Weeper, where the 2nd, 4th, 6th, 14th, 21st stanzas are as sublimely dull as the 7th, 8th, 9th, 16th, 17th, 20th, and 23rd stanzas of the same copy, are soft and pleasing And if these last want any thing, it is an easier and more unaffected expression. The remaining thoughts in that poem might have been spared, being either but repetitions or very trivial and mean. And by this example, one may guess at all the rest to be like this; a mixture of tender, gentle thoughts, and suitable expressions, of forced and inextricable conceits, and of needless fillers up to the rest. From all which, it is plain this author writ fast, and set down what came uppermost. A reader may skim off the froth, and use the clear underneath; but if he goes too deep, will meet with a mouthful of dregs: either the top or bottom of him are good for little, but what he did, in his own natural middle-way, is best.

"To speak of his numbers is a little difficult, they are so various and irregular, and mostly Pindarick : 'tis evident his heroic verse (the best example of which

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- just can be expected from him. All that

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will probably be wanting; only pretty confine metaphors, glittering expressions

, and ething of a neat cast of verse (which are properly

and in these verses. This is, indeed, the case of most se poetical writers of Miscellanies; nor can it well otherwise, since no man can be a true poet

, who for diversion only. These authors should be

as versifiers and witty men rather than as and under this head will only fall the Thoughts, e Expression, and the Numbers. These are only the alisering parts of poetry, which may be judged of at a and comprehended all at once; and (to express literary Correspendence, vol. i., p. 802; 1735.

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of the worst versificators.

the Dies Ira."

of his writing, he was (even as incorrect E

I will just observe that the best pieces are a paraphrase of Psalm xxiii., on Less on M. Ashton, Wishes to his Supposed of Crashaw's poetry, is unjust to its spirt have been written in forgetfulness of his pe perament and disposition. Whatever he d of devotional ardour in St. Mary's Church letter is cold and languid. Such phrases a d'Herode, and the Prolusion of Strada.

is his Music's Duel) is carelessly made up imagine, from what it now is, that had h care, it had been musical and pleasing extremely majestic, but sweet. And the tin

This criticism, while it is generally fair with all his might, and no person who rec the Steps to the Temple were composed during sider him to have writ like a gentleman, an hours, to keep out idleness. The praise throu cast of verse," and “

none of the worst ver: are not surely applicable to the translator of th

I am insinuating against Pope any intentional depre the genius of Crashaw (the malevolent a Philips have been satisfactorily repelled by but it may be doubted whether his tastes judices did not unfit him to deliver an impart ment on the merits of Crashaw. His own ima was always in subjection to his taste, flow bold and glittering stream, yet rarely, etcep Epistle to Abelard, overleaping the channel

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