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In 160 ke prired a copy of verses to Robert Stel
fardo ta Miwal Learned Discourses. Shelford wa
of Peterhuse, and Rector of Ringsfield, in Safik
Casori mummendation of this work requins nota
tori nu austered to advocate doctrines inimical to
the stribe church. Archbishop Usher condense
sit with indimain, in a letter to Dr. Ward, Sept lie
Tax "Bany, while we strive here to maintain the
pant dau ancient truth, how cometh it to pass that
pou o Cambridge do cast such stumbling-blocks in der
wy, by publishing into the world such rotten stuf 21
Shalind bath rented in his Five Discourses; wherein
And Anwene, The Jesuits of England sent over the
duit bither to confirm our papists in their obstinacy,
dar as fast as we can. I pray God this sin be not

deaty laid to their charge, who give an occasion to our
bubinomey of faith to justification, and to impugn the doctrine of our
tilah article, of Justification by faith only; for which he was convented
by the Vice-Chancellor, who was willing to accept of an easy acknor.
Adment: but the same party preaching his Latin sermon, pro Gradu, the

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manner of life, indeed, powerfully predisposed him to lend a willing ear to the gorgeous deceptions of a poetical religion. Every day he passed several hours in the solitude of St. Mary's Church. “In the temple of God, under his wing, he led his life in St. Mary's Church, near St. Peter's College, under Tertullian's roof of angels; there he made his nest more gladly than David's swallow near the house of God; where, like a primitive saint, he offered more prayers in the night, than others usually offer in the day *."

On the 20th of November, 1636, he removed to Peterhouse, of which he was made Fellow in 1637, and Master of Arts in the following year. Of his occupations in these seasons of tranquility, the only fruits are to be found in his poems; but bis various acquirements prove him to have been something more than a dreamer. In 1641, Wood says that he took degrees at Oxford. He also entered into Holy Orders, and soon became a preacher of great energy and power.

His richness of diction, and animation of style, were well calculated to render him an effective minister of the Gospel.

Stormy days were swiftly coming on. In August, 1642, the University had testified its loyalty by sending the public plate to the King to coin into money; and Cromwell, then member of Parliament for the Town of Cambridge, is supposed to have succeeded in intercepting a portion of the treasure. An act of devotion to the royal cause was not likely to be forgotten. In 1644, the University was converted into a garrison for the Parliament, principally under the superintendence of

• Pref. co Steps to the Tempie, 1646.

elem cantilenam canere, which moved our Vice-Chancellor, Dr. Lore

, call for his sermon, which he refused to deliver. Whereupoa, upon Wednesday last, being Barnaby

Day, the day appointed for the admis elp of the Bachelors of Divinity, which must answer Die Comitiorum, he was stayed by the major part of the suffrages of the Doctors of the

The truth is, there are some Heads among us, that a great abettors of M. Tournay, the party above mentioned, who, po doubt, are backed by others." -Letter from Ward of Sidney Collins June, 1634, to Archbishop Usher. Life by Parr, p. 470.

Master Shelford bath of late affirmed in print, that the Pope was never yet defined to be the Antichrist by any Sypode.-Huntley's Beqiate, third edition, 1637, p. 308.

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Cromwell. That his soldiers," says Mr.

“were not debauched or licentious, is show firm his assertion in a strange manner, by that they frequently displayed the fervour of in the demolishing of images and painted with impunity; the beautiful grove of Jesus Co cut down, and the precious collection of con away from St. John's. But the animosity Sectaries was not exhausted in these excesses. into the system of the University, which their affirm to have been demanded by the circums the times. The direction of these alterations trusted to the Earl of Manchester, whose col patience and resignation, we are left to con Cambridge had been his abode for twelve yea

most indubitable testimony:" and he proceeThe hand of the spoiler was, of a truth, stresame year they prepared to introduce those and winning affability, have gained the

Crashaw was ejected from his
ship on the 8th of April, 1644, and was succe
Howard Beecher. Joseph Beaumont, the au
Psyche, was banished on the same day.
Whether he endured this unexpected calami

College was full of old familiar faces, and

in its neighbourhood must have been ende delightful associations. He had, besides, been

long to indulge the romance of his in tion, that the intelligence of his dismissal broke like a hasty awakening from a pleasant dream. he supported himself after leaving Cambridge known; his friends were as poor and helpless a self. About this time he is considered by Car

gance
of Clarendon.

own spot

tomed so

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Crazvell "Thirt bó soldiers," says Mr. Catrin
'per mat ihbacked' ar licentious, is shown by the
DUST Abilithe Atizony:" and he proceeds to be
An té art in a strange manner, by admitting
that they haguzty displayed the fervour of their mal
in the danskeling of images and painted windows
Du kand the spoiler was, of a truth, stretched out

di disit, the beautiful grove of Jesus College en
an and the precious collection of coins taka

174) Hon & John's. But the animosity of the sus die ystem of the University, which their defenders

o bave been demanded by the circumstances of
and the Earl of Manchester, whose courtly ele

A visning affability, have gained the applaas
garaits neighbourhood must have been endeared by
delizitul associations. He had, besides, been accus-

pie Crasbaw was ejected from his fellow

at Berber. Joseph Beaumont, the author

Whether be endured this unexpected calamity with

sthat the intelligence of his dismissal broke on him

The direction of these alterations was in

have seceded from the Protestant Church *. Carter, after mentioning his conversion, adds, that "though a person of exalted piety, yet he was a disgrace to the list.”. We must not be too harsh in our censure of his conduct. The seed that took deep root in the poet's bosom, had also sprung up and flourished for a little while in the breasts of Jeremy Taylor and Chillingworth, who were both, for a short period, Catholics. In the Legenda Lignea Crashaw is termed an active ring-leader, and his motives are attacked with great virulence and malignity.

“Master Crashaw (son to the London Divine), and sometimes Fellow of St. Peterbouse, in Cambridge, is another slip of the times that is transplanted into Rome. This peevish, silly seeker, glided away from his principles in a poetical vein of fancy, and an impertinent curiosity; and finding that verses and measured flattery took and much pleased some female wits, Crashaw crept by degrees into favour and acquaintance with some court ladies * *, and got first the estimation of an innocent, harmless convert; and a purse being made by some deluded, vain-glorious ladies and their friends, the poet was despatched in a pilgrimage to Rome, where if he had found in the See Pope Urban the Eighth, instead of Pope Innocent, he might possibly have received a greater number and a better quantity of benedictions. But Innocent being more harsh and dry, the poor small poet, Crashaw, met with none of the generation and kindred of Mecænas, nor any great blessing from his Holiness, which misfortune puts the pitiful wire-drawer into a humour of admiring his own raptures; and in this fancy, like Narcissus, he is fallen in love with his own shadow, conversing with himself in

History of the University of Cambridge.

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the 8th of April, 1644, and was succeeded by

fari, was banished on the same day.

and resignation, we are left to conjecture

. had been his abode for twelve years :

his was full of old familiar faces, and every

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College

pored so long to indulge the romance of his imagina.

teo basty awakening from a pleasant dream. How Je supported himself after leaving Cambridge is not his friends were as poor and helpless as bimo

this time he is considered by Carter to

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only laughed at, or at most pitied, by his ne

quality *"

verse, and admiring the birth of his own brai who, conceiving him unworthy of any pre their Church, have given him leave to live 19 swine, and almost ready to starve in poor

One of the Court ladies" particularly a was the Countess of Denbight in whose con the Papal creed he appears to have been inst But the charges of dishonesty and desire of vehemently urged against him, are unfounde ever his sentiments may have been, he was n from the faith of his father by those “ chord and silver twist,” which the writer of the Leg fetched over so many." Crashaw did not rer in England; he retired to France, where his

An unknown and humble scholar could no Jermyn, found him in Paris, and in great Cowley had been his companion at Cambridge obtain, in a foreign land, the assistance denie

In 1646, Cowley, then Secretary this hour of affliction is said to have made him of his slender fortunes. Crashaw's introductie Queen of Charles the First, has been usually a to the influence of Cowley; but Dodd, the Church-historian, ascribes it to Dr. Gough Car. Cowley's connexion with the fortunes King point him out as the most probable ben From the Queen, Crashaw received letters of mendation to Italy, where he became Secreta • Legenda Lignea, Lond. 1652, p. 169.

+ Among his poems is a letter to this Lady, against irreso delay in matters of religion.

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were very severe.

his own.

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i bystied; he retired to France, where his sufferings

res, all the birth of his own brains. He is
alrigabalt arut most pitied, by his new patrone
the faworthy of any preferati
dar una bona giren him leave to live like a la
mente

, ad aliud ready to starve in poot 1
de la Court ladies" particularly alluded
w the loss of Denbigh in whose conversion ha
de Pared be appears to have been instrumental
Bar dezes of dishonesty and desire of gain, so
Frekanst azed against him, are unfounded; white
par testaments may have been, he was not dram
het lite of his father by those "chords of gold
ushtrist " which the writer of the Legenda says

ozkrown and humble scholar could not hope to
stand á a foreign land, the assistance denied him in
into bad been his companion at Cambridge, and in
sy hour of affliction is said to have made him partaker

r

many." Crashaw did not remain long

Cardinal at Rome. Cole thinks that he was acting in this capacity in 1648, a surmise undoubtedly well founded, although the reference to Carier's Missive to James must be erroneous, since it was published more than thirty years before; and George Hakewill's learned reply to it appeared in 1616.

Of Crashaw's condition in Italy, a brief, but interesting account is given by Dr. John Bargrave, who had been his fellow-collegian at Peterhouse, and who was also driven from Cambridge by the warrant of the Earl of Manchester*. Upon his expulsion he went abroad, and Wood calls him a great traveller.

“When I first went of my four times to Rome, there were three or four revolters to the Roman Church, that had been Fellows of Peterhouse, in Cambridge, with myself. The name of one of them was Mr. R. Crashaw, who was of the Seguita (as their term is), that is, an attendant, or one of the followers of Cardinal Palotta, for which he had a salary of crowns by the month (as the custom is), but no diet. Mr. Crashaw infinitely commended his Cardinal, but complained extremely of the wickedness of those of his retinue, of which he, Laving his Cardinal's ear, complained to him; upon which, the Italians fell so far out with him, that the Cardinal, to secure his life, was fain to put him from his service, and procuring him some small employ at the Lady's of Loretto, whither he went in pilgrimage in the summer-time, and, over-heating himself, died in a few weeks after he came thither; and it was doubtful whether he was not poisoned t." In the margin of the folio edition of Cowley's Works, Cole's MSS., vol. 42, p. 114, 115, 125, 126, 127.

The MS. from which the above extract is taken is printed in Todd's Works of Milton,

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In 1646, Cowley, then Secretary to Lond found him in Paris, and in great poverty.

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slender fortunes. Crashaw's introduction to the

of Charles the First, has been usually attributed o site infuence of Cowley; but Dodd, the Catholic Bech-historian

, ascribes it to Dr. Gough and Mr. De Cowley's connexion with the fortunes of the ting point him out as the most probable benefactor.

the Queen, Crashaw received letters of recomendation to Italy, where he became Secretary to a

Legends Lignes, Lond. 1651, p. 169.
Among his poems is a letter to this Lady, against irresolution and

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