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more affecting, from the remembrance of its sp

Thy house would but a dungeon prove,
And shall the dew outstrip Thy dove ?

O come, for Thou dost know the way,
This stanza, from Content, has much grace &

harmonious; the thought in the third stanza is
pleasing, and the concluding prayer of the poet is
fulfilment:-

My stock lies dead, and no increase
Doth my dull husbandry improve ;
O, let Thy graces, without cease,

Drop from above!
If still the sun should hide his face,
Thy works night's captives; 0, let grace

Drop from above!
The dew doth every morning fall,
The dew for which grass cannot call,

Drop from above !
Or, if to me Thou wilt not move,
Remove me where I need not say,

Drop from above !

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melody:

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Give me the pliant mind, whose gentle measure

Complies and suits with all estates,
Which can let loose to a crown; and yet with pleasur

Take up within a cloister's gate.
The poem on Life is, in the conception, very beautifu
and some of the lines could only have emanated from
mind of true poetical feeling; but the same affecte

which marred the verses upon Virtue, is als

discoverable here :

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dura, from Content, has much grace and

SURGI BERBERT.

| amaia; Haigal in the third stanas i rary
placing and wasluding prayer of the poet is
air hing He the remembrance of its spent

ont dis died, and no increase
and ardal busbandry improve;

Olay grees, without cease,
It can should hide his face,
my hea muld but a dungeon prove,

y maks night's captives; 0, let grace
de still the dew outstrip Thy dove?
what far which grass cannot call,
Daize for Thou dost know the way,

in me Thou wilt not move,

jane me where I need not say,
Camplies and suits with all estates,
Vich can let loose to a crown; and yet with pleasure

Drop from above!
Drop from above!
Drop from above!

por der deth erery morning fall,

But time did beckon to the flowers, and they
By noon most cunningly did steal away

And wither in my hand.
My hand was next to them, and then my heart.
I took, without more thinking, in good part,

Time's gentle admonition :
Who did so sweetly Death's sad taste convey,
Making my mind to smell my fatal day,

Yet sug'ring the suspicion.
Farewell, dear flowers ! Sweetly your time ye spent,
Fit while ye lived, for smell and ornament,

And after death for cures.
I follow straight, without complaints or grief,
Since if my scent be good, I care not if

It be as brief as yours. Of the epithets and individual thoughts that ever distinguish the work of a true poet, the Temple affords more specimens than I have space to enumerate. But one exquisite verse may be quoted, in which the appearance of the Church of God is contrasted with the pomps of earth :

And when I view abroad both regiments,

The world's and Thine;
Thine clad with simpleness and sad events,
The other fine, &c.

Frailty. How the blessed names of those who have suffered and died in defence of our religion arise to our remembrance, when we read these words! We think of Latimer, of Cranmer, and Ridley, and the glorious company of sainted martyrs, whom they guided unto eternal glory.

The next poem is given only as an example of the meek and Scriptural tone of the author's mind.

Drop from above!

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Gre Be the pliant mind, whose gentle measure

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Tate up within a cloister's gate.

Life is, in the conception, very beautiful, of the lines could only bave emanated from a at true poetical feeling; but the same afected msich marred the verses upon Virtue

, is also

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erupable here:

I made a posie while the day ran by; Here will I smell say remnant out, and tie

My life within this band:

These specimens from the Temple cannot be brought eloquent eulogy of the work, in the Life of Donne." It to a close in more appropriate words than Walton's is a book," he says, “in which, by declaring his own spiritual conflicts, he hath comforted and raised many a dejected and discomposed soul, and charmed them into sweet and quiet thoughts; a book, by the reading whereof, and the assistance of that spirit that seemed to inspire the author, the reader may attain habits of peace and piety, and all the gifts of the Holy Ghost and heaven, and may, by still reading, still keep those sacred fires burning upon the altar of so pure a heart

UNKINDNESS.
Lord, make me coy and tender to offend;
In friendship, first I think if that agree

Which I intend,
Unto my friend's intent and end
I would not use a friend as I use Thee.
If any touch my friend, or his good name,
It is my bonour and my love to free

His blasted fame
From the least spot or thought of blame.
I could not use a friend as I use Thee.
When that my friend pretendeth to a place,
I quit my interest and leave it free;

But when Thy grace
Sues for my heart, I Thee displace;
Nor would I use a friend as I use Thee.
Yet, can a friend what Thou hast done fulfil?
Or write in brass, “My God upon a tree,

“ His blood did spill,
"Only to purchase my good will;"
Yet use I not my foes as I use Thee.

66

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burning upon the altar of so pure a heart

Lase make me up and tender to offend;
ha frakts list I think if that agree

Vito ay kad's intent and end
Inil nie a friend as I use Thee.
lay fud any friend, or his good name,

Bina hanur and my love to free
What that my friend pretendeth to a place,

Tral op interest and leave it free;
Nor mould I use a friend as I use Thee.
It ma a friend what Thou hast done fulfil ?

trazile in brass, “My God upon a tree,
Disa prezidens from the Temple cannot be brought
110k in more appropriate words than Walton's

and he says, "in which, by declaring his own
saatlicts, he hath comforted and raised many a
and and discomposed soul, and charmed them into

ger thoughts; a book, by the reading
and and the assistance of that spirit that seemed
got the author, the reader may attain habits of

DYLINDNESS.
But when Thy grace
Sus for my heart, I Thee displace;

as shall free it from the anxieties of this world, and keep it fixed upon things that are above."

The writer would have wished no higher praise, yet the extracts I have given may incline the reader to con. sider the Temple deserving of study, for a better reason than that for which Pope is said frequently to have perused it*. A few of the poems were translated into Latin, and published, with others, by W. Dillinghamt.

Granger asserts, that the poems annexed to the Temple were written by Crashaw; but the translator of the Sospetto d'Herode could never have subdued his genius to the level of the Synagogue. Granger may have been led into error by Crashaw's lines On Mr. G. Herbert's Book, of which he was a warm admirer. Sir John Hawkins, in his edition of Walton's Angler, says, that Christopher Harvey was the author; but whether he was the same individual who was Rector of Clifton in Warwickshire, and died in 1663, cannot be deter. mined. The doubt is not worth the solving.

Herbert's circle of acquaintance embraced some of his most eminent contemporaries. It will be sufficient to name Sir Henry Wotton, the friend of Milton, Sir Herry Goodyere, Dudley, the third Lord North, and James Duport. Sir H. Goodyere was the frequent correspondent of Donne, who says, in a letter addressed to him, "Mr. George Herbert is here at the receipt of your letter, and with service to you, tells you that all at Uvedall House are wellt." Lord North was one of the most distinguished noblemen of the Court of James the First; but, having dissipated the larger portion of

Essay on the Genius and Writings of Pope, p. 85. Poemata Varü Argumenti Partim Georgio Herberto Latinè Reddita.

Letters, 1851, p. 235.

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Herbert *."

poems, a series of devotions, in imitation of the 119th

Mrs. Herbert survived her husband, and “continued, says Walton, his disconsolate widow about six years, bemoaning herself, and complaining that she had lost versation and time had so moderated her sorrows that she became the happy wife of Sir Robert Cook, of Highnam, in the county of Gloucester. But she never say that name must live in her memory till she put off mortality." She also “preserved many of Mr. Herbert's private writings, which she intended to make public; account of their disappearance is not so satisfactory.

his estate, he retired to the country, and lived in peni. tence, or at least in solitude, on the remainder. He published a volume of Miscellanies in 1645, under the title of A Forest of Varielies, containing, among other Psalm. In the introduction, he speaks of the “divinest the delight of her eyes." Thus she continued, “ till conforgot to mention the name of Mr. George Herbert, and but they and Highnam House were burnt together by the late rebels, and so lost to posterity." Aubrey's

Herbert, he says, wrote a folio, in Latin, which, because the parson of Hineham could not read, his widow (then wife to Sir Robert Cook) condemned to the use of good housewifery. This intelligence was communicated io Aubrey by Mr. Arnold Cook, one of the sons of Sir Robert, whom he had desired to ask his mother-in-law for Herbert's MSS.

• Sir Egerton Brydges has given copious extracts from this volume, in the Peers of James, 410., p. 349, &c.

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