Popular Ballads and Songs: From Tradition, Manuscripts and Scarce Editions; with Translations of Similar Pieces from the Ancient Danish Language, and a Few Originals by the Editor, Volume 2

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A. Constable and Company, 1806 - Ballads, Danish
 

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Page 240 - THERE were three Kings into the east, Three Kings both great and high, And they hae sworn a solemn oath John Barleycorn should die. They took a plough and plough'd him down, Put clods upon his head, And they hae sworn a solemn oath John Barleycorn was dead. But the...
Page 276 - Though other purses be more fat, Why should we pine or grieve at that ? Hang sorrow ! care will kill a cat, And therefore let's be merry. Hark ! how the wags abroad do call Each other forth to rambling : Anon you'll see them in the hall For nuts and apples scrambling. Hark ! how the roofs with laughter sound ! Anon they'll think the house goes round : For they the cellar's depth have found, And there they will be merry. The wenches with their...
Page 9 - So thick beset with thorns and briers ? That is the path of righteousness, Though after it but few enquires. " And see ye not that braid, braid road, That lies across that lily leven ? That is the path of wickedness, Though some call it the road to Heaven.
Page 124 - When the porter came his lord before, He kneeled down low on his knee: "What aileth thee, my proud porter, Thou art so full of courtesie?" "I've been porter at your gates, It's thirty long years now and three; But there stands a lady at them now, The like o...
Page 123 - I wish I were in my own countrie." And she has ta'en her gay gold ring, That with her love she brake so free ; Says, " Gi'e him that, ye proud porter, And bid the bridegroom speak to me.
Page 352 - Are up, and gotten lear, They'll help to gar the boatie row, And lighten a' our care. The boatie rows, the boatie rows, The boatie rows fu' weel ; And lightsome be her heart that bears The murlain and the creel.
Page 155 - THERE was a lady of the North Country, Lay the bent to the bonny broom And she had lovely daughters three. Fa la la la, fa la la la ra re 2 There was a knight of noble worth Which also lived in the North.
Page 274 - Now all our neighbours' chimneys smoke, And Christmas blocks are burning ; Their ovens they with baked meats choke, And all their spits are turning. Without the door let sorrow lie ; And if for cold it hap to die, We'll bury't in a Christmas pie, And evermore be merry.
Page 275 - Drab and dice their lands away, Which may be ours another day ; And therefore let's be merry. The client now his suit forbears, The prisoner's heart is eased. The debtor drinks away his cares, And for the time is pleased. Though others...
Page 277 - And twenty other gambols mo, Because they will be merry. Then wherefore in these merry days Should we, I pray, be duller .' No, let us sing some roundelays, To make our mirth the fuller. And...

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