The Works of the Rev. Jonathan Swift...

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W. Durell & Company, 1812

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Page 111 - But the wisdom that is from above, is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, and easy to be entreated, full of mercy and good fruits, without partiality, and without hypocrisy.
Page 57 - Deliver me not over unto the will of mine enemies: for false witnesses are risen up against me, and such as breathe out cruelty.
Page 58 - And said, This fellow said, I am able to destroy the temple of God, and to build it in three days.
Page 16 - Likewise, ye younger, submit yourselves unto the elder. Yea, all of you be subject one to another, and be clothed with humility : for God resisteth the proud, and giveth grace to the humble.
Page 141 - When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this sign, that the dunces are all in confederacy against him.
Page 28 - Moreover thou shalt provide out of all the people able men, such as fear God, men of truth, hating covetousness ; and place such over them, to be rulers of thousands, and rulers of hundreds, rulers of fifties, and rulers of tens...
Page 225 - She never had the least absence of mind in conversation, nor given to interruption, or appeared eager to put in her word, by waiting impatiently until another had done. She spoke in a most agreeable voice, in the plainest words, never hesitating, except out of modesty before new faces, where she was somewhat reserved ; nor, among her nearest friends, ever spoke much at a time. She was but little versed...
Page 18 - And the eye cannot say unto the hand, I have no need of thee : nor again the head to the feet, I have no need of you. Nay, much more those members of the body, which seem to be more feeble, are necessary...
Page 148 - ... learned or any man a lawyer. Kings are commonly said to have long hands ; I wish they had as long ears. Princes in their infancy, childhood, and youth are said to discover prodigious parts and wit, to speak things that surprise and astonish; strange so many hopeful princes and so many shameful kings. If they happen to die young, they would have been prodigies of wisdom and virtue ; if they live, they are often prodigies indeed, but of another sort.
Page 144 - The stoical scheme of supplying our wants by lopping off our desires, is like cutting off our feet when we want shoes.

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