The life of Samuel Johnson. [Followed by] The journal of a tour to the Hebrides, Volume 2

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Routledge, Warne, and Routledge, 1851
 

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Page 101 - If I had not done among them the works which none other man did, they had not had sin: but now have they both seen and hated both me and my Father.
Page 38 - I have said that you are to state facts fairly ; so that your thinking, or what you call knowing, a cause to be bad, must be from reasoning, must be from your supposing your arguments to be weak and inconclusive. But, Sir, that is not enough. An argument which does not convince yourself may convince the judge to whom you urge it ; and if it does convince him, why, then, Sir, you are wrong, and he is right.
Page 12 - Redress the rigours of the inclement clime ; Aid slighted truth with thy persuasive strain ; Teach erring man to spurn the rage of gain : Teach him, that states of native strength...
Page 59 - While he was talking loudly in praise of those lines, one of the company ventured to say, " Too fine for such a poem: — a poem on what?" JOHNSON, (with a disdainful look,) "Why, on dunces. It was worth while being a dunce then. Ah, Sir, hadst thou lived in those days ! It is not [94] worth while being a dunce now, when there are no wits.
Page 216 - Knowledge is of two kinds. We know a subject ourselves, or we know where we can find information upon it.
Page 123 - I believe they might be good beings ; but they were not fit to be in the University of Oxford. A cow is a very good animal in the field ; but we turn her out of a garden.
Page 11 - How small of all that human hearts endure, That part which kings or laws can cause or cure...
Page 297 - A ship is worse than a gaol. There is, in a gaol, better air, better company, better conveniency of every kind ; and a ship has the additional disadvantage of being in danger. When men come to like a sea-life, they are not fit to live on land."—" Then (said I) it would be cruel in a father to breed his son to the sea.
Page 100 - My request, therefore, is, that you would rectify this matter in your new edition. You are at liberty to make what use you please of this letter. 'My best wishes ever attend you and your family. Believe me to be, with the utmost regard and esteem, dear Sir, 'Your obliged and affectionate humble servant, J. BEATTIE.
Page 112 - Sir Adam suggested, that luxury corrupts a people, and destroys the spirit of liberty. JOHNSON. "Sir, that is all visionary. I would not give half a guinea to live under one form of government rather than another. It is of no moment to the happiness of an individual. Sir, the danger of the abuse of power is nothing to a private man. What Frenchman is prevented from passing his life as he pleases?" SIR ADAM. "But, Sir, in the British constitution it is surely of importance to keep up a spirit in the...

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