The Shadow of the Obelisk: And the Other Poems

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Hatchards, 1872 - 115 pages
 

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Page 95 - DIRGE FOR ONE WHO FELL IN BATTLE ROOM for a Soldier ! lay him in the clover ; He loved the fields, and they shall be his cover ; Make his mound with hers who called him once her lover : Where the rain may rain upon it, Where the sun may shine upon it, Where the lamb hath lain upon it, And the bee will dine upon it.
Page 55 - ON A BUST OF DANTE. SEE, from this counterfeit of him Whom Arno shall remember long, How stern of lineament, how grim The father was of Tuscan song. There but the burning sense of wrong, Perpetual care and scorn abide ; Small friendship for the lordly throng; Distrust of all the world beside. Faithful if this wan...
Page 32 - I may have but a minute to speak to you. My, dear, be a good man — be virtuous — be religious — be a good man. Nothing else will give you any comfort when you come to lie here.' — He paused, and I said — ' Shall I send for Sophia and Anne?' — 'No,' said he, 'don't disturb them.
Page 71 - Voluptuous coast ! no wonder that the proud Imperial Roman found in yonder isle Some sunshine still to gild Fate's gathering cloud, And lull the storm of conscience for a while. What new Tiberius, tired of lust and life, May rest him here to give the world a truce, — A little...
Page 25 - Saco's side, They found the mangled forms of four, Held in an eddy of the tide ; But Mary, she was seen no more. Yet never to this mournful vale Shall any maid, in summer time, Come without thinking of the tale I now have told you in my rhyme. And when the Willey House is gone, And its last rafter is decayed, Its history may yet live on In this your ballad that I made.
Page 32 - Sir Walter breathed his last, in the presence of all his children. It was a beautiful day— so warm that every window was wide open — and so perfectly still that the sound of all others most delicious to his ear, the gentle ripple of the Tweed over its pebbles...
Page 56 - Unsullied still, though still severe, Which, through the wavering days of sin, Kept itself icy-chaste and clear. Not wholly such his haggard look When wandering once, forlorn, he strayed...
Page 94 - He loved the fields, and they shall be his cover; Make his mound with hers who called him once her lover: Where the rain may rain upon it, Where the sun may shine upon it, Where the lamb hath lain upon it, And the bee will dine upon it. Bear him to no dismal tomb under city churches; Take him to the fragrant fields, by the silver birches, Where the whippoorwill shall mourn, where the oriole perches: • Make his mound with sunshine on it, Where the bee will dine upon it, Where the lamb hath lain...
Page 95 - Where the sun may shine upon it, Where the lamb hath lain upon it, And the bee will dine upon it. Sunshine in his heart, the rain would come full often Out of those tender eyes which evermore did soften : He never could look cold till we saw him in his coffin. Make his mound with sunshine on it, Plant the lordly pine upon it, Where the moon may stream upon it, And memory shall dream upon it. "Captain or Colonel...
Page 2 - I stood upon the Corso where its greatness Rome retains. Yet it was not ancient glory, though the midnight radiance fell Soft on many a princely mansion, many a dome's majestic swell ; Though, from some hushed corner gushing, oft a modern fountain gleamed, Where the marble and the waters in their freshness equal seemed : What though open courts unfolded columns of Corinthian mould ? Beautiful it was, — but altered ! naught bespake the Rome of old.

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