Iron: An Illustrated Weekly Journal for Iron and Steel Manufacturers, Metallurgists, Mine Proprietors, Engineers, Shipbuilders, Scientists, Capitalists ..., Volume 52

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Knight and Lacey, 1850 - Industrial arts
 

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Page 323 - Nicole, do hereby declare that the nature of my said Invention, and the manner in which the same is to be performed, are...
Page 29 - Presents will and ordain that this Our Commission shall continue in full force and virtue, and that you, Our said Commissioners, or any three or more of you may from time to time proceed in the execution thereof, and of every matter and thing therein contained, although the same be not continued from time to time by adjournment. AND...
Page 106 - In wrought-iron bars no very perceptible effect was produced by 10,000 successive deflections by means of a revolving cam, each deflection being due to half the weight which, when applied statically, produced a large permanent flexure.
Page 106 - The results of these experiments were, that when the depression was equal to one-third of the ultimate deflection, the bars were not weakened. This was ascertained by breaking them in the usual manner with stationary loads in the centre. When, however, the depressions produced by the machine were made equal to one-half of the ultimate deflection, the bars were actually broken by less than nine hundred depressions.
Page 188 - During the passageof this experimental train through the tube, a breathless silence prevailed, until the train rushed out exultingly, and with colours flying, on the other side of the tube, when loud acclamations arose, followed at intervals by the rattle of artillery down the straits.
Page 105 - A heavy ball was suspended by a wire 18 feet long, from the roof, so as to touch the centre of the side of the bar. By drawing this ball out of the vertical position at right angles to the length of the bar in the manner of a pendulum, to any required distance, and suddenly releasing it, it could be made to strike a horizontal blow upon the bar, the magnitude of which could be adjusted at pleasure, either by varying the size of the ball or the distance from which it was released. Various bars (some...
Page 135 - ... estimating the strength of the structure, be considered as the greatest load to which the bridge is subject. Lastly ; the power of a beam to resist impact varies with the mass of the beam, the striking body being the same, and by increasing the inertia of the beam without adding to its strength the power to resist impact is within certain limits also increased. Hence it follows that weight is an important consideration in structures exposed to concussions.
Page 105 - A heavy ball was suspended by a wire eighteen feet long from the roof, so as to touch the centre of the side of the bar. By drawing this ball out of the vertical position at right angles to the length of the bar, in the manner of a pendulum, to any required distance, and suddenly releasing it, it could be made to strike a horizontal blow upon the bar; the magnitude of which could be regulated at pleasure, either by varying the size of the ball or the distance from which it was released.
Page 135 - That as it has appeared that the effect of velocity communicated to a load is to increase the deflection that it would produce if set at rest upon the bridge; also that the dynamical increase in bridges of less than 40 feet in length is of sufficient importance to demand attention, and may even for lengths of...
Page 29 - And furthermore, we do by these presents give and grant to you, or any three or more of you, full power and authority to call before you, or any three or more of you...

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