Mrs. Shakespeare: The Complete Works : a Novel

Front Cover
Arcade Publishing, 2000 - Fiction - 216 pages
It is April 1594. William Shakespeare, a budding poet and playwright plying his trade in London, magnanimously invites his estranged wife Anne Hathaway to come down from Stratford-on-Avon to celebrate his thirtieth birthday.
"Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?" he inquires politely as she arrives. "No thanks," she responds.
This playful but gently probing novel portrays Shakespeare as one has never seen him before, through the eyes of Anne, a tamed but not unloving shrew. Writing her memoirs seven years after his death, she reminisces about her now-famous husband, recalling in particular that unforgettable week in April 1594 and what happened to her in a certain strange bed in his lodgings above a fishmonger's shop - an enormous four-poster that the playwright referred to as their "private playhouse." Mrs. Shakespeare's tales offer insights into Will's secret lives, including solving the mystery of the second best bed that he bequeathed her, as well as the question that has intrigued countless scholars through the centuries: to whom and for whom the Dark Sonnets were written.
In telling these stories, and many others, Anne Hathaway casts a brilliant new light on Shakespeare, providing a very close look at the master by one who shared his bed but never bothered to read him. Robert Nye knows Shakespeare as well as any living scholar or historian, and his use of fiction to recreate the Bard's world brings him and Anne Hathaway wonderfully alive. This is a riot of scholarship and bawdy writing.
 

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MRS. SHAKESPEARE: The Complete Works

User Review  - Kirkus

The dexterous Nye provides another wonderful Shakespearean "biography" (The Late Mr. Shakespeare, 1999), this time by giving Anne Hathaway her chance to tell all.And tell all she does, in short takes ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - kaionvin - LibraryThing

Summary: Mrs. Shakespeare, now widowed, recollects her one trip to London to visit her famous bard husband- deconstructing the man, the myth, the image. Anne's no poet- she's down-to-earth, unlearned ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
8
Section 3
16
Section 4
23
Section 5
25
Section 6
32
Section 7
35
Section 8
38
Section 18
105
Section 19
114
Section 20
116
Section 21
117
Section 22
125
Section 23
140
Section 24
141
Section 25
143

Section 9
39
Section 10
40
Section 11
55
Section 12
57
Section 13
59
Section 14
70
Section 15
72
Section 16
74
Section 17
87
Section 26
145
Section 27
165
Section 28
166
Section 29
188
Section 30
202
Section 31
215
Section 32
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Robert Thomas Nye was born in London, England on March 15, 1939. At the age of 16, he left school and published his first poem, Kingfisher, in the London Magazine. He was a poet who also wrote novels, plays, and stories for children. His collections of poetry include Juvenilia, Juvenilia 2, and The Rain and The Glass, which won the Cholmondeley Award. He became the poetry editor of the newspaper The Scotsman in 1967. From 1971 to 1996, he was the poetry critic of The Times of London. His children's books include Taliesin, March Has Horse's Ears, and Beowulf: A New Telling. His first novel for adults, Doubtfire, was published in 1967. His other novels for adults included The Life and Death of My Lord Gilles de Rais, Merlin, Faust, The Memoirs of Lord Byron, Mrs. Shakespeare: The Complete Works, and The Late Mr. Shakespeare. His novel, Falstaff, won The Hawthornden Prize and Guardian Prize for Fiction. During the early 1970s, he wrote several plays for BBC radio including A Bloody Stupid Hole. He died from cancer on July 3, 2016 at the age of 77.

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