Principles of Class Teaching

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Macmillan and Company, limited, 1902 - Elementary school teaching - 442 pages
 

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Page 53 - Therefore am I still A lover of the meadows and the woods And mountains; and of all that we behold From this green earth...
Page 154 - Hey, diddle diddle, the cat and the fiddle, The cow jumped over the moon. The little dog laughed to see such sport, And the dish ran away with the spoon!
Page 53 - Two things fill the mind with ever new and increasing admiration and awe, the oftener and the more steadily we reflect on them: the starry heavens above and the moral law within.
Page 379 - The Centipede was happy quite, Until the Toad, in fun Said, "Pray, which leg goes after which?" That worked her mind to such a pitch, She lay distracted in a ditch, Considering how to run.
Page 431 - This done, we began to pour quicksilver into the longer leg of the siphon which by its weight pressing up that in the shorter leg did by degrees streighten the included air; and continuing this pouring in of quicksilver till the air in the shorter leg was by condensation reduced to take up but half the space it possessed (I say possessed, not filled) before; we cast our eyes upon the longer leg of the glass...
Page 65 - A servant with this clause makes drudgery divine; who sweeps a room, as for thy laws, makes that and the action fine.
Page 364 - When I speak of the habitual imitation and continued study of masters, it is not to be understood, that I advise any endeavour to copy the exact peculiar colour and complexion of another man's mind; the success of such an attempt must always be like his, who imitates exactly the air, manner, and gestures, of him whom he admires. His model may be excellent, but the copy will be ridiculous...
Page 22 - My son, hear the instruction of thy father, and forsake not the law of thy mother: For they shall be an ornament of grace unto thy head, and chains about thy neck.
Page 429 - We took then a long glass -tube, which, by a dexterous hand and the help of a lamp, was in such a manner crooked at the bottom, that the part turned up was almost parallel to the rest of the tube, and the orifice of this shorter leg of the siphon (if I may so call the whole instrument) being hermetically sealed, the length of it was divided into inches (each of which was subdivided into eight parts) by a straight list of paper, which containing those divisions, was carefully pasted all along it.
Page 358 - Invention in Painting does not imply the invention of the subject ; for that is commonly supplied by the Poet or Historian. With respect to the choice, no subject can be proper that is not generally interesting. It ought to be either some eminent instance of heroick action, or heroick suffering.

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