The Works of Dr. Jonathan Swift, Dean of St. Patrick's, Dublin, Volume 15

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W. Bowyer, C. Bathurst, W. Owen, W. Strahan, J. Rivington, J. Hinton, L. Davis, and C. Reymers, R. Baldwin, J. Dodsley, S. Crowder and Company and B. Collins., 1765 - Swift, Jonathan
 

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Page 249 - I confess myself to be touched with a very sensible pleasure, when I hear of a mortality in any country parish or village, where the wretches are forced, to pay for a filthy cabin, and two ridges of potatoes, treble the worth; brought up to steal or beg, for want of work; to whom death would be the best thing to be wished for, on account both of themselves and the public*.
Page 251 - And the people said unto Saul, Shall Jonathan die, who hath wrought this great salvation in Israel ? God forbid : as the LORD liveth, there shall not one hair of his head fall to the ground ; for he hath wrought with God this day. So the people rescued Jonathan, that he died not.
Page 447 - Never was any of her sex born with better gifts of the mind, or who more improved them by reading and conversation. Yet her memory was not of the best, and was impaired in the latter years of her life. But I cannot call to mind that I ever once heard her make a wrong judgment of persons, books, or affairs. Her advice was always the best, and with the greatest freedom, mixed with the greatest decency. She had a gracefulness, somewhat more than human, in every motion, word, and action.
Page 356 - Violent zeal for truth hath an hundred to one odds to be either petulancy, ambition, or pride. There is a degree of corruption wherein some nations, as bad as the world is, will proceed to an amendment; till which time particular men should be quiet.
Page 445 - She was sickly from her childhood until about the age of fifteen, but then grew into perfect health, and was looked upon as one of the most beautiful, graceful, and agreeable young women in London, only a little too fat. Her hair was blacker than a raven, and every feature of her face in perfection.
Page 444 - SUrrey, on the thirteenth day of March, in the year 1681. Her father was a younger brother of a good family in Nottinghamshire, her mother of a lower degree; and indeed she had little to boast of her birth.
Page 448 - This is the night of the funeral, which my sickness will not suffer me to attend. It is now nine at night ; and I am removed into another apartment, that I may not see the light in the church, which is just over against the window of my bed-chamber.
Page 447 - There seemed to be a combination among all that knew her, to treat her with a dignity much beyond her rank : yet people of all sorts were never more easy than in her company.
Page 419 - I break, or neglect, and wherein; and reform accordingly. Not to talk much, nor of myself. Not to boast of my former beauty, or strength, or favour with ladies, etc.
Page 450 - She never had the least absence of mind in conversation, nor given to interruption, or appeared eager to put in her word, by waiting impatiently until another had done. She spoke in a most agreeable voice, in the plainest words, never hesitating, except out of modesty before new faces, where she was somewhat reserved ; nor, among her nearest friends, ever spoke much at a time.

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