Children's Literature: A Textbook of Sources for Teachers and Teacher-training Classes, Part 1923

Front Cover
Charles Madison Curry, Erle Elsworth Clippinger
Rand, McNally, 1921 - Children - 693 pages
 

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Contents

There was an old woman who lived in a shoe
33
When a twister atwisting
34
Tom Thumbs Alphabet
35
London Bridge
36
Little BoPeep
37
Taffy 131 Simple Simon
38
When I Was a Little Boy
39
The Fox and His Wife
40
Jemima
41
The Courtship Merry Marriage and Picnic Dinner of Cock Robin and Jenny Wren
42
The Burial of Poor Cock Robin
44
Dame Wiggins of Lee and Her Seven Wonderful Cats
45
This Is the House That Jack Built
48
The Egg in the Nest
49
SECTION III
51
Bibliography
52
Introductory
53
The Old Woman and Her
56
HennyPenny
58
TeenyTiny
59
The Cat and the Mouse 60 151 The Story of the Three Little Pigs
61
Titty Mouse and Tatty Mouse
63
The Story of the Three Bears
64
The Three Sillies
67
Lazy Jack
69
The Story of Mr Vinegar
71
Jack and the Beanstalk
73
Tom Thumb
79
Whittington and His Cat
84
Tom Tit Tot
89
Little Red Riding Hood
92
True History of Little Golden Hood
94
Puss in Boots
97
Toads and Diamonds
100
Cinderella or the Little Glass Slipper
102
Drakestail 106
107
Beauty and the Beast
110
Why the Bear Is Stumpy Tailed
122
The Three BillyGoats Gruff
123
The Husband Who Was to Mind the House
124
Boots and His Brothers
125
The Quern at the Bottom of the Sea
128
The Traveling Musicians
132
The Blue Light
134
The Elves and the Shoemaker
137
The Fisherman and His Wife
138
RoseBud
142
Rumpelstiltskin
144
SnowWhite and RoseRed
146
The Lambikin
150
Tit for Tat
152
Pride Goeth before a Fall 154
154
The Mirror of Matsuyama 156 185 The TongueCut Sparrow
158
The Straw Ox
160
Connla and the Fairy Maiden
162
The Horned Women
164
King OToole and His Goose
165
SECTION IV
169
Bibliography
170
Introductory
171
Abram S Isaacs 190 A FourLeaved Clover
174
The Rabbi and the Diadem 174 II Friendship
175
An Eastern Garden
176
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
177
The Story of Fairyfoot
210
Oscar Wilde 200 The Happy Prince
217
Raymond MacDonald Alden 201 The Knights of the Silver Shield
223
Jean Ingelow
227
202 The Princes Dream 227 Frank R Stockton m
233
John Ruskin 204 The King of the Golden River
245
The Shepherds Boy 266SECTION V
266
FABLES AND SYMBOLIC STORIES
267
iEsop
272
R E Francillon
330
Thomas Bulfinch 262 Midas
338
Charles Mills Gayley 263 Phaethon 34
340
Thomas Bulfinch 264 Thors Visit to Jotunheim
343
Hamilton Wright Mabie 265 Odins Search for Wisdom
348
Bibliography 38
368
Introductory
369
Eliza Lee Follen 269 The Three Little Kittens
371
Runaway Brook
372
Sara J Hale 274 Mary Had a Little Lamb
373
Lucy Larcom 276 The Brown Thrush
374
Lydia Maria Child 277 Thanksgiving Day
375
Susan Coolidge 279 How the Leaves Came Down
377
The Leak in the Dike
378
Robert Louis Stevenson
380
Whole Duty of Children
381
A Good Play
382
My Bed Is a Boat
383
Where Go the Boats
384
Flying Kite
385
The SugarPlum Tree
386
The Duel
387
The CircusDay Parade
388
The Raggedy Man
389
Mary Howitt 307 The Spider and the Fly
390
William Howitt 308 The Wind in a Frolic
391
Ann Taylor 309 The Cow
392
Meddlesome Matty
393
The Star 394 Christina G Rossetti 313 Seldom or Never
394
A Diamond or a Coal? 39s 317 The Swallow
395
The Wonderful World
396
GoodNight and GoodMorning 396 William Roscoe 323 The Butterflys Ball 397 Author Unknown 324 Can You?
398
Pippas Song
399
Lewis Carroll
405
MYTHS
412
Bibliography
418
SECTION VII
441
Dr John Aiken and Mrs Letitia
442
POETRY
444
Thomas
456
SECTION VIII
496
Bibliography
510
Albert Bigelow Paine
516
Kellogg
524
Olive Thorne Miller
548
Ernest Thompson Seton 394 The Poacher and the Silver Fox
556
Rudyard Kipling
562
Bibliography
576
Felix Summerley
586
Sir Thomas Malory King Arthur and His Round Table
595
Maude Radford Warren
603
Horace E Scudder 412 The Proud King
620
Author Unknown 414 AllenaDale
628
Benjamin Franklin
645
23
687

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Popular passages

Page 419 - I WANDERED lonely as a cloud That floats on high o'er vales and hills, When all at once I saw a crowd, A host of golden daffodils, Beside the lake, beneath the trees, Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. Continuous as the stars that shine And twinkle on the Milky Way, They stretched in never-ending line Along the margin of a bay: Ten thousand saw I at a glance, Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.
Page 29 - OLD King Cole was a merry old soul, And a merry old soul was he; He called for his pipe, and he called for his bowl, And he called for his fiddlers three.
Page 394 - Twinkle, twinkle, little star, How I wonder what you are! Up above the world so high, Like a diamond in the sky.
Page 423 - Philomel, with melody Sing in our sweet lullaby ; Lulla, lulla, lullaby, lulla, lulla, lullaby : Never harm, Nor spell nor charm, Come our lovely lady nigh ; So, good night, with lullaby.
Page 415 - Exceeding peace had made Ben Adhem bold, And to the presence in the room he said, "What writest thou?" The vision raised its head, And, with a look made of all sweet accord, Answered, "The names of those who love the Lord." "And is mine one?
Page 678 - ... cometh to you with words set in delightful proportion, either accompanied with, or prepared for, the well-enchanting skill of music; and with a tale, forsooth, he cometh unto you, with a tale which holdeth children from play and old men from the chimney corner...
Page 373 - Mary had a little lamb, Its fleece was white as snow, And everywhere that Mary went, The lamb was sure to go.
Page 406 - The time has come,' the Walrus said, 'To talk of many things; Of shoes — and ships — and sealing wax — Of cabbages — and kings — And why the sea is boiling hot — And whether pigs have wings.
Page 294 - Bagdat, in order to pass the rest of the day in meditation and prayer. As I was here airing myself on 'the tops of the mountains, I fell into a profound contemplation on the vanity of human life; and passing from one thought to another, Surely, said I, man is but a shadow, and life a dream.
Page 424 - Breathes there the man, with soul so dead, Who never to himself hath said, This is my own, my native land ? Whose heart hath ne'er within him burned, As home his footsteps he hath turned, From wandering on a foreign strand ? If such there breathe, go mark him well...

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