The Incarnational Art of Flannery O'Connor

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Mercer University Press, 2005 - Literary Criticism - 258 pages
The Incarnational Art of Flannery O'Connor argues that O'Connor designed a unique asthetic to defy the Gnostic dualisms that characterize American intellectual and spiritual life. Focusing on stories with artist figures, objets d'art, child protagonists, and embodied images, Lake describes how O'Connor's fiction actively resisted romantic theories of the imagination and religious life by highlighting the epistemological necessity of the body. Ultimately O'Connor challenges the romantic and modern notion of the artist as a fire-stealing Prometheus and replaces it with a notion of the artist as a locally committed craftsman. Drawing upon M. M. Bakhtin's early essays in Art and Answerability and Toward a Philosophy of the Act, Lake illustrates O'Connor's conviction that art deliberately assigns the highest value of transcendental beauty to those beings least valued by the modern world, and challenges us to do the same. The book culminates with an original reading of Parker's Back that shows how in art, as in life, true knowledge comes to us through our own grotesque bodies and those of others. Unafraid of the mystery of being human, art can be the place where we encounter anew the world as more than what the intellect can unravel.
 

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Contents

Prologue The Incarnational Art of Fiction
1
Who will Remain Whole? Who?
14
Wise Blood and the Poison of the Modern World
55
Body Matters Boys without Mothers
91
Body Matters Good Country People and A Temple of the Holy Ghost
118
Transcending the Transcendentalists Bishop as Beauty in The Violent Bear It Away
141
The Artist at Home
179
Mary Anns Face and Parkers Back The Grotesque Body Under Construction
208
Epilogue
240
Bibliography
245
Index
253
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