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both Houses of Parliament, or in the intervals of Parliament by the Commissioners, to continue during the pleasure of the said Houses, or in the intervals of Parliament during the pleasure of the aforementioned Commissioners, to be approved or disallowed by both Houses at their next sitting. And that the Chancellor or Lord Keeper, Lord Treasurer, Commissioners of the Great Seal or Treasury, Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports, Chancellors of the Exchequer, and Duchy, Secretaries of State, Judges of both Benches, and of the Exchequer of the kingdoms of England and Ireland, be nominated by both Houses of Parliament, to continue quam diu se bene gesserint, and in the intervals of Parliament by the aforementioned Commissioners, to be approved or disallowed by both Houses at their next sitting ; the like for the kingdom of Scotland, adding the Justice General, and in such manner as the Estates in Parliament there shall think fit.

21. That by Act of Parliament the education of your Majesty's children, and the children of your heirs and successors, be in the true Protestant religion, and that their tutors and governors be of known integrity, and be chosen by the Parliaments of both kingdoms, or in the intervals of Parliaments, by the aforenamed Commissioners, to be approved or disallowed by both Parliaments at their next sitting. And that if they be male, they be married to such only as are of the true Protestant religion, if they be females, they may not be married but with the advice and consent of both Parliaments, or in the intervals of Parliament, of their Commissioners.

22. That your Majesty will give your royal assent to such ways and means as the Parliaments of both kingdoms shall think fitting for the uniting of the Protestant princes, and for the entire restitution and re-establishment of Charles Lodowick, Prince Elector Palatine, his heirs and successors, to his electoral dignity, rights and dominions, provided that this extend not to Prince Rupert or Prince Maurice, or the children of either of them, who have been the instruments of so much bloodshed and mischief against both kingdoms.

23. That by Act of Parliament the concluding of peace or war with foreign Princes and States, be with advice and consent of both Parliaments, or in the intervals of Parliaments, by their Commissioners.

24. That an Act of Oblivion be passed in the Parliaments of both kingdoms respectively, relative to the qualifications in the propositions aforesaid, concerning the joint Declaration of both kingdoms, with the exception of all murderers, thieves, and other offenders not having relation to the war.

25. That the members of both Houses of Parliament, or others, who have during this Parliament been put out of any place or office, tension or benefit, for adhering to the Parliament, may either be restored thereunto or otherwise have recompense for the same, upon the humble desire of both Houses of Parliament. The like for the kingdom of Scotland.

26. That the armies may be disbanded at such time and in such manner as shall be agreed upon by the Parliaments of both kingdoms, or such as shall be authorised by them to that effect.

27. That an Act be passed for the granting and confirming of the charters, customs, liberties and franchises of the City of London, notwithstanding any nonuser, misuser, or abuser. That the militia of the City of London may be in the ordering and government of the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Commons in Common Council assembled, or such as they shall from time to time appoint, whereof the Lord Mayor and Sheriffs for the time being to be there. And that the militia of the parishes without London, and the liberties within the weekly bills of mortality, may be under command of the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Commons in Common Council of the said City, to be ordered in such manner as shall be agreed on and appointed by both Houses of Parliament.

That the Tower of London may be in the government of the City of London, and the chief officer and governor thereof from time to time be nominated and removable by the Common Council.

That the citizens or forces of London shall not be drawn out of the City into any other parts of the kingdom without their own consent, and that the drawing of their forces into other parts of the kingdom in these distracted times, may not be drawn into example for the future.

And for prevention of inconveniences, which may happen by the long intermission of Common Councils, it is desired that there be an Act that all Bye-laws and Ordinances already made or hereafter to be made by the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Commons in Common Council assembled, touching the calling, continuing, directing and regulating of the same, shall be as effectual in law to all intents and purposes, as if the same were particularly enacted by the authority of Parliament. And that the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Commons in Common Council may add to or repeal the said Ordinances from time to time as they shall

see cause.

That such other propositions as shall be made for the City for their further safety, welfare and government, and shall be approved of by both Houses of Parliament, may be granted and confirmed by Act of Parliament.

53. THE KING'S PROPOSITIONS TO BE DISCUSSED AT

UXBRIDGE.

[January 21, 1645. Rushworth, v. 858.] 1. That His Majesty's own revenue, magazines, towns, forts and ships, which have been taken or kept from him by force, be forthwith restored unto him.

2. That whatsoever hath been done or published contrary to the known laws of the land, or derogatory to His Majesty's legal and known power and rights, be renounced and recalled; that no seed may remain for the like to spring out of for the future.

3. That whatsoever illegal power hath been claimed or exercised by or over his subjects, as imprisoning or putting to death their persons without law, stopping their Habeas Corpuses, and imposing upon their estates without Act of Parliament, &c., either by both or either House, or any Committee of both or either, or by any persons appointed by any of them, be disclaimed, and all such persons so committed forthwith discharged.

4. That as His Majesty hath always professed his readiness to that purpose, so he will most cheerfully consent to any good Acts to be made for the suppression of Popery, and for the firmer settling of the Protestant religion established by law; as also that a good Bill may be framed for the better preserving of the Book of Common Prayer from scorn and violence; and that another Bill may be framed for the ease of tender consciences, in such particulars as shall be agreed upon. For all which His Majesty conceives the best expedient to be, that a National Synod be legally called with all convenient speed.

5. That all such persons, as upon the Treaty shall be excepted and agreed upon on either side out of the general pardon, shall be tried per pares, according to the usual

course and known law of the land, and that it be left to that either to acquit or condemn them.

6. And to the intent this Treaty may not suffer interruption by any intervening accidents, that a cessation of arms and free trade for all His Majesty's subjects may be agreed upon with all possible speed. Given at the Court at Oxford, the twenty-first day of

January, 1644.

54. THE SELF-DENYING ORDINANCE.

[April 3, 1645. Rushworth, vi. 16. See Great Civil War, ii. 145.] An Ordinance of the Lords and Commons assembled in Par

liament, for the discharging of the Members of both Houses from all offices, both military and civil. Be it ordained by the Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament, that all and every of the members of either House of Parliament shall be, and by authority of this Ordinance are discharged at the end of forty days after the passing of this. Ordinance', of and from all and every office or command military or civil, granted or conferred by both or either of the said Houses of this present Parliament, or by any authority derived from both or either of them since the 20th day of November, 1640.

And be it further ordained, that all other governors and commanders of an island, town, castle or fort, and all other colonels and officers inferior to colonels in the several armies, not being members of either of the Houses of Parliament, shall, according to their respective commissions, continue in their 'several places and commands, wherein they were employed and intrusted the 20th day of March, 1644, as if this Ordinance had not been made. And that the vice-admiral, rear-admiral, and all other captains and other inferior officers in the fleet, shall, according to their several and respective commissions, continue in their several places and commands, wherein they were employed and intrusted the said 20th day of March, as if this Ordinance had not been made.

Provided always, and it is further ordained and declared, that during this war, the benefit of all offices, being neither military nor judicial, hereafter to be granted, or any way to be appointed to any person or persons by both or either House of Parliament, or by authority derived from thence, shall go and inure to such public uses as both Houses of Parliament shall appoint. And the grantees and persons executing all such offices shall be accountable to the Parliament for all the profits and perquisites thereof, and shall have no profit out of any such office, other than a competent salary for the execution of the same, in such manner as both Houses of Parliament shall order and ordain.

1 In the first Ordinance sent up by the Commons on December 19, 1644, and thrown out by the Lords on January 13, 1644, members of either · Houses were absolutely disqualified from serving.

Provided that this Ordinance shall not extend to take away the power and authority of any Lieutenancy or DeputyLieutenancy in the several counties, cities or places, or of any Custos Rotulorum, or of any commission for Justices of Peace, or sewers, or any commission of Oyer and Terminer, or gaol-delivery.

Provided always, and it is hereby declared, that those members of either House who had offices by grant from His Majesty before this Parliament, and were by His Majesty displaced sitting this Parliament, and have since by authority of both Houses been restored, shall not by this Ordinance be discharged from their said offices or profits thereof, but shall enjoy the same; anything in this Ordinance to the contrary thereof notwithstanding.

55. THE NEGATIVE OATH.

[April 5, 1645. Rushworth, vi, 141.) An Ordinance of the Lords and Commons assembled in Par

liament, for enabling the Commissioners of the Great Seal, and the other Committees in their several Counties, to tender an Oath to all such persons of what degree or quality soever,

that shall come in to the protection of the Parliament. Be it ordained by the Lords and Commons in Parliament assembled, that all and every person of what degree or quality soever, that hath lived or shall live within the King's quarters, or been aiding, assisting or adhering unto the forces raised against the Parliament, and hath or shall come to inhabit or reside under the power and protection of the Parliament, shall swear upon the holy evangelist in manner following:

‘I, A. B., do swear from my heart that I will not directly

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