The Constitutional Documents of the Puritan Revolution, 1625-1660

Front Cover
Samuel Rawson Gardiner
Clarendon Press, 1889 - Constitutional history - 376 pages

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Contents

The Declaration of Sports
31
9 Act of the Privy Council on the position of the Communion Table at St Gregorys
35
Specimen of the first Writ of Shipmoney
37
The Kings Case laid before the Judges with their Answer
40
Extracts from the Speech of Oliver St John in the Ship money Case
41
Extracts from the Argument of Sir Robert Berkeley Justice of the Kings Bench
46
The Scottish National Covenant
54
Suggested answer to the Propositions drawn up for the King
60
Petition of Twelve Peers for the summoning of a new Parliament
64
The Kings Writ summoning the Great Council
66
PART II
67
The Triennial Act
74
Act repealing several clauses in Statutes imposing penalties
83
The Protestation
84
Act for the Attainder of the Earl of Strafford
85
Act against Dissolving the Long Parliament without its own consent
87
The Tonnage and Poundage Act
88
The Ten Propositions
91
Bill on Church Reform read twice in the House of Lords
94
Act for the Abolition of the Court of Star Chamber
106
Act for the Abolition of the Court of High Commission
112
Act declaring the illegality of Shipmoney
115
Act for the limitation of Forests
117
Act prohibiting the exaction of Knighthood Fines
121
Resolutions of the House of Commons on Ecclesiastical In novations
122
Order of the House of Lords on the Services of the Church
124
The Kings Speech to the Recorder of the City of London
126
The Grand Remonstrance
127
The Kings Proclamation on Religion
154
The Kings Answer to the Petition accompanying the Grand Remonstrance
155
The Impeachment of one member of the House of Lords and of five members of the House of Commons
158
A Declaration of the House of Commons touching a late breach of their Privileges
159
The Impressment Act
164
The Militia Ordinance
166
The Declaration of the Houses on Church Reform
168
The Kings Proclamation condemning the Militia Ordinance
169
The Nineteen Propositions sent by the two Houses of Parlia ment to the King at York
170
Declaration of the Houses in Defence of the Militia Ordinance
175
The Kings Letter sent with the Commissions of Array to Leicestershire
178
The Negative Oath
206
Order of the two Houses for taking away the Court of Wards
207
The Propositions of the Houses sent to the King at Newcastle
208
The Kings first answer to the Propositions presented at New castle
223
The Kings second answer to the Propositions presented at Newcastle
224
by the leading Presbyterians and a small number of the Independents and forwarded by the French Ambassador to Cardinal Mazarin to be laid before...
226
The Kings third answer to the Propositions presented at Newcastle
227
The Heads of the Proposals offered by the Army 232
232
The Kings answer to the Propositions of Parliament
241
Letter of Charles I to the Speaker of the House of Lords 743
243
The Four Bills with the Propositions accompanying them
248
The Engagement between the King and the Scots
259
Additional Articles of the Engagement
264
The Kings reply to the Four Bills and the accompanying Propositions 205
265
The Vote of No Addresses
267
The Ordinance erecting a High Court of Justice for the Kings Trial
268
The Agreement of the People
270
The Charge against the King
282
The Kings reasons for declining the jurisdiction of the High Court of Justice
284
The sentence of the High Court of Justice upon the King
287
The Death Warrant of Charles I
290
PART IV
291
Engagement taken by the members of the Council of State
293
Act abolishing the office of King
294
Act abolishing the House of Lords
296
Engagement to be taken by all men of the age of eighteen
298
for not coming to Church
300
Act for the Settlement of Ireland
303
Declaration of the Lord General and the Council on the disso lution of the Long Parliament
308
Summons to a Member of the socalled Barebones Parliament
313
The Instrument of Government
314
An Ordinance by the Protector for the Union of England and Scotland
325
An Ordinance by the Protector for Elections in Scotland
329
An Ordinance by the Protector for Elections in Ireland
332
The Humble Petition and Advice
334
The Additional Petition and Advice
345
Writ summoning Richard Cromwell to the House of Lords of the Protectorate
350
The Declaration of Breda
351
APPENDIX The Constitutional Bill of the first Parliament of the Protectorate
353

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Page 97 - ... our Sovereign Lord the King, his heirs and successors, and the other moiety to him or them that will sue for the same.
Page 3 - Nevertheless, against the tenor of the said statutes, and other the good laws and statutes of your realm to that end provided...
Page 86 - I, AB, do in the Presence of Almighty God promise, vow and protest, To maintain and defend as far as lawfully I may, with my life, power and estate, the True Reformed Protestant Religion, expressed in the Doctrine of the Church of England...
Page 41 - When the good and safety of the kingdom in general is concerned, and the whole kingdom in danger...
Page 4 - ... they were detained by your Majesty's special command, signified by the lords of your Privy Council, and yet were returned back to several prisons, without being charged with anything to which they might make answer according to the law.
Page 3 - ... your subjects have inherited this freedom, that they should not be compelled to contribute to any tax, tallage, aid or other like charge not set by common consent in parliament.
Page 5 - The King willeth that right be done according to the laws and customs of the realm ; and that the statutes be put in due execution, that his subjects may have no cause to complain of any wrong or oppressions, contrary to their just rights and liberties, to the preservation whereof he holds himself as well obliged as of his prerogative.
Page 4 - And whereas also by authority of parliament, in the five and twentieth year of the reign of King Edward III, it is declared and enacted, that no man shall be forejudged of life or limb against the form of the Great Charter and the law of the land...
Page 4 - That no man should be forejudged of life or limb against the form of the great charter and the law of the land; and by the said great charter and other the laws and statutes of this your realm, no man ought to be adjudged to death but by the laws established in this your realm, either by the customs of the same realm, or by acts of parliament...
Page 3 - ... law of the land. IV. And in the eight and twentieth year of the reign of King Edward III, it was declared and enacted by authority of parliament, that no man, of what estate or condition that he be, should be put out of his land or tenements, nor taken, nor imprisoned, nor disherited, nor put to death without being brought to answer by due process of law.

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