The Englishman: A Novel. In Six Volumes, Volume 6

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Printed at the Minerva-Press, for A.K. Newman and Company Leadenhall-Street, 1812
 

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Page 212 - Pursues that chain which links th' immense design, Joins heaven and earth, and mortal and divine ; Sees that no being any bliss can know, But touches some above, and some below ; Learns from this union of the rising whole, The first, last purpose of the human soul ; And knows where faith, law, morals, all began, All end in love of God and love of man.
Page 223 - The reverend champion stood. At his control Despair and anguish fled the struggling soul; Comfort came down the trembling wretch to raise, And his last faltering accents whispered praise.
Page 173 - Tis liberty alone that gives the flower Of fleeting life its lustre and perfume ; And we are weeds without it. All constraint, Except what wisdom lays on evil men, Is evil ; hurts the faculties, impedes Their progress in the road of science ; blinds The eyesight of Discovery ; and begets, In those that suffer it, a sordid mind Bestial, a meagre intellect, unfit To be the tenant of man's noble form.
Page 82 - Here woman reigns ; the mother, daughter, wife, Strews with fresh flowers the narrow way of life; In the clear heaven of her delightful eye, An angel-guard of loves and graces lie ; Around her knees domestic duties meet, And fireside pleasures gambol at her feet. " Where shall that land, that spot of earth be found...
Page 213 - But when thou findest sensibility of he^art joined with softness of manners ; an accomplished mind, with a form agreeable to thy fancy ; take her home to thy house ; she is worthy to be thy friend, thy companion in life, the wife of thy bosom...
Page 271 - Faded ideas float in the fancy like halfforgotten dreams, and the imagination in its fullest enjoyments becomes suspicious of its offspring, and doubts whether it has created or adopted.
Page 100 - ... pieces of formality and your romps that have no regard to the common rules of civility. There are some ladies that affect a mighty regard for their relations. "We must not eat to-day, for my uncle Tom, or my cousin Betty, died this time ten years. Let's have a ball to-night, it is my neighbour Such-a-one's birthday.
Page 211 - See the sole bliss heaven could on all bestow ! Which who but feels can taste, but thinks can know : Yet poor with fortune, and with learning blind, The bad must miss, the good untaught will find : Slave to no sect, who takes no private road, But looks through nature up to nature's God ; Pursues that chain which links th...
Page 82 - There is a spot of earth supremely blest — A dearer, sweeter spot than all the rest...
Page 193 - The first and most important quality of a woman is gentleness. Made to obey a being as imperfect as man, often so full of vices, and always so full of faults, she ought early to learn to suffer even injustice, and to endure the wrongs of a husband without complaint ; and it is not for him, but for herself that she ought to be gentle.

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