Letters on education

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Page 379 - Clarendon paints as possessing beyond all his contemporaries " a head to contrive, a tongue to persuade, and a hand to execute...
Page 322 - This flapper is likewise employed diligently to attend his master in his walks, and upon occasion to give him a soft flap on his eyes ; because he is always so wrapped up in cogitation, that he is in manifest danger of falling down every precipice and bouncing his head against every post, and in the streets, of jostling others, or being jostled himself, into the kennel.
Page xx - In case my said godson, Philip Stanhope, shall, " at any time hereafter, keep, or be concerned in keeping " of, any race-horses, or pack of hounds ; or reside one night at Newmarket, that infamous seminary of iniquity and ill-manners, during the course of the races there ; or shall resort to the said races ; or shall lose, in any one day, at any game or bet whatsoever, the sum of 500/.
Page 398 - Know the true value of time ; snatch, seize, and enjoy every moment of it. No idleness, no laziness, no procrastination ; never put off till to-morrow what you can do to-day.
Page 30 - Every one as they like, as the good man said when he kissed his cow ; everybody would be persuaded that you had never kept company with anybody above footmen and housemaids. Attention will do all this ; and without attention nothing is to be done : want of attention, which is really want of thought, is either folly or madness. You should not only have attention to everything, but a, quickness of attention, so as to observe, at once, all the people in the room, their motions, their looks, and their...
Page 29 - ... twenty times, into the dishes again. If he is to carve, he can never hit the joint : but, in his vain efforts to cut through the bone, scatters the sauce in everybody's face.
Page 187 - Women, then, are only children of a larger growth ; they have an entertaining tattle, and sometimes wit ; but for solid, reasoning good sense, I never in my life knew one that had it, or who reasoned or acted consequentially for four and twenty hours together.
Page 40 - ... conform; and then they should be able to do it well. And, though I would not have you a dancer, yet, when you do dance, I would have you dance well, as I would have you do everything you do, well. There is no one thing so trifling, but which (if it is to be done at all) ought to be done well. And I have often told you, that I wished you even played at pitch, and cricket, better than any boy at Westminster. For instance; dress is a very foolish thing; and yet it is a very foolish thing for a man...
Page 88 - There are two sorts of good company ; one, which is called the beau monde, and consists of those people who have the lead in courts, and in the gay part of life ; the other consists of those who are distinguished by some peculiar merit, or who excel in some particular and valuable art or science. For my own part, I used to think myself in company as much above me, when I was with Mr. Addison and Mr. Pope, as if I had been with all the princes in Europe.
Page 120 - Generosity often runs into profusion, economy into avarice, courage into rashness, caution into timidity, and so on : insomuch that, I believe, there is more judgment required for the proper conduct of our virtues, than for avoiding their opposite vices. Vice, in its true light, is so deformed, that it shocks us at first sight ; and would hardly ever seduce us, if it did not, at first, wear the mask of some virtue. But virtue is, in itself, so...