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Wearied is the mother that has a stoorie wean,
A wee stumpie stoussie that canna run his lane;
That has a battle aye wi' sleep before he'll close

an e'eBut a kiss frae aff his rosy lips gives strength anew

to me.

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RIDING SCHOOL. This is the way the ladies ride,

Jimp and sma', jimp and sma'; This is the way the gentlemen ride,

Trottin' a', trottin' a'; This is the way the cadgers ride, Creels and a'! creels and a'!! creels and a’!!!

HORSE-SHOEING.
JOHN SMITH, fellow fine,
Can you shoe this horse o' mine?
Yes, indeed, and that I can,
As well as any man !
There's a nail upon the tae,
To make the powny speel the brae;
There's a nail upon the heel,
To make the powny pace weel ;
There's a nail, and there's a brod,
There's a horse weel shod,

Weel shod, weel shod, &c.. [Here imagination converts the nursery fireside into

a smithy, the nurse into a blacksmith, and her young charge into a shoeless horse.]

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OLD CHAIRS AND OLD CLOTHES.
IF I'd as much money as I could spend,
I never would cry, Old chairs to mend,
Old chairs to mend, Old chairs to mend,
I never would cry, Old chairs to mend !
If I'd as much money as I could tell,
I never would cry, Old clothes to sell,
Old clothes to sell, Old clothes to sell,
I never would cry, Old clothes to sell !

NIEVIE, NIEVIE, NICKNACK.

NIEVIE, nievie, nicknack,
Which hand will ye tak'?
Tak’ the right, or tak’ the wrang,
I'll beguile ye, if I can.

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LANG KAIL. Gin ye be for lang kail,

Cow* the nettle, cow the nettle ; Gin ye be for lang kail,

Cow the nettle early. Cow it laigh, cow it soon,

Cow it in the month o' June, Just when it is in the bloom,

Cow the nettle early. Auld wife, wi' ae tooth,

Cow the nettle, cow the nettle ; Auld wife, wi' ae tooth,

Cow the nettle early.

CROSS PATCH.
CROSS patch,

Draw the latch,
Sit by the fire and spin :

Take a cup,

And drink it up,
Then call the neighbours in.

* Cull.

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A NEW-MARRIED MAN. A. Good morning, good fellow ! B. I'm no' a good fellow ; I'm a new-married man. A. Oh, man, that's good. B. No' sae good as ye trow. A. What then, lad ? B. I've got an ill-willy wife. A. Oh, man, that's bad. B. No' sae bad as ye trow. A. What then, lad ? B. She brought me a good tocher and a weel

plenished house. A. Oh, man, that's good. B. No' sae good as ye trow. A. What then, lad ? B. The house took fire, and burnt both plenishing

and gear. A. Oh, man, that's bad. B. No' sae bad as ye trow. A. What then, lad ? B. The ill-willy wife was burnt in the middle o't."

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