Woman: as she is, and as she should be

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Page 56 - I am ashamed that women are so simple To offer war where they should kneel for peace, Or seek for rule, supremacy and sway, When they are bound to serve, love and obey.
Page 198 - Unargued I obey : so God ordains ; God is thy law, thou mine : to know no more Is woman's happiest knowledge and her praise.
Page 239 - With shining ringlets the smooth ivory neck. Love in these labyrinths his slaves detains, And mighty hearts are held in slender chains. With hairy springes we the birds betray, Slight lines of hair surprise the finny prey, Fair tresses man's imperial race ensnare, And beauty draws us with a single hair.
Page 31 - Childe Harold had a mother - not forgot, Though parting from that mother he did shun; A sister whom he loved, but saw her not Before his weary pilgrimage begun: If friends he had, he bade adieu to none.
Page 67 - There is no point of the compass to which they cannot turn, and by which they are not turned; and by one as well as another; for motion not method is their occupation. To know this, and yet continue to be in love, is to be made wise from the dictates of reason, and yet persevere...
Page 248 - I have kissed I know not how oft. Where be your gibes now? your gambols? your songs? your flashes of merriment, that were wont to set the table on a roar? Not one now, to mock your own grinning? quite chapfallen? Now get you to my lady's chamber, and tell her, let her paint an inch thick, to this favour she must come; make her laugh at that. Prithee, Horatio, tell me one thing. Hor. What's that, my lord? Ham. Dost thou think Alexander looked o' this fashion i
Page 131 - Elles tireront aussi diverses commoditez de l'histoire. En la philosophie, de la part qui sert la vie, elles prendront les discours qui les dressent juger de nos humeurs et conditions, se deffendre de nos trahisons, ...
Page 203 - A youth and maiden meeting by chance, or brought together by artifice, exchange glances, reciprocate civilities, go home, and dream of each other. Such," says Rasselas, "is the common process of marriage.
Page 2 - Among men, you see the ninety-and-nine, toiling and scraping together a heap of superfluities for one (and this one too, oftentimes the feeblest and worst...
Page 99 - English stage ; for there is no question but our great grand-children will be very curious to know the reason why their forefathers used to sit together like an audience of foreigners in their own country, and to hear whole plays acted before them in a tongue which they did not understand.

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