The American Tyler-keystone: Devoted to Freemasonry and Its Concerdant Others, Volume 8

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J. H. Brownell, 1894
 

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Page 53 - Because thou sayest, I am rich, and increased with goods, and have need of nothing, and knowest not that thou art wretched, and miserable, and poor, and blind, and naked...
Page 5 - They say unto him, He will miserably destroy those wicked men, and will let out his vineyard unto other husbandmen, which shall render him the fruits in their seasons.
Page 360 - Entreat me not to leave thee, or to return from following after thee; for whither thou goest, I will go; and where thou lodgest, I will lodge. Thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God. Where thou diest, will I die, and there will I be buried. The Lord do so to me, and more also, if aught but death part thee and me.
Page 472 - So the multitude goes like the flower or the weed That withers away to let others succeed. So the multitude comes — even those we behold, To repeat every tale that has often been told. For we are the same our fathers have been, We see the same sights our fathers have seen, We drink the same stream, we view the same sun, And run the same course our fathers have run.
Page 6 - Death is the crown of life : Were death denied, poor man would live in vain : Were death denied, to live would not be life: Were death denied, e'en fools would wish to die. Death wounds to cure; we fall, we rise, we reign! Spring from our fetters, fasten in the skies, Where blooming Eden withers in our sight. Death gives us more than was in Eden lost! This king of terrors...
Page 253 - Life ! I know not what thou art, But know that thou and I must part ; And when, or how, or where we met, I own to me's a secret yet. But this I know, when thou art fled Where'er they lay these limbs, this head, No clod so valueless shall be As all that then remains of me.
Page 360 - It may not be our lot to wield The sickle in the ripened field ; Nor ours to hear, on summer eves, The reaper's, song among the sheaves, Yet where our duty's task is wrought In unison with God's great thought, The near and future blend in one, And whatsoe'er is willed, is done...
Page 102 - Lives of great men all remind us We can make our lives sublime, And, departing, leave behind us Footprints on the sands of time; Footprints, that perhaps another, Sailing o'er life's solemn main, A forlorn and shipwrecked brother, Seeing, shall take heart again.
Page 359 - NOW it came to pass in the days when the judges ruled, that there was a famine in the land. And a certain man of Beth-lehem-judah went to sojourn in the country of Moab, he, and his wife, and his two sons.
Page 354 - Breathes there a man, with soul so dead, Who never to himself has said, This is my own, my native land!

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