Poems

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Macmillan and Company, 1850 - 196 pages
 

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Page 88 - With frogs for their watch-dogs. All night awake. High on the hill-top The old King sits ; He is now so old and gray He's nigh lost his wits. With a bridge of white mist Columbkill he crosses, On his stately journeys From Slieveleague to Rosses; Or going up with music On cold starry nights To sup with the Queen Of the gay Northern Lights.
Page 89 - When she 'came down again Her friends were all gone. They took her lightly back Between the night and morrow, They thought that she was fast asleep, But she was dead with sorrow. They have kept her ever since Deep within the lakes, On a bed of flag-leaves, Watching till she wakes.
Page 89 - He shall find their sharpest thorns In his bed at night. Up the airy mountain, Down the rushy glen, We daren't go a-hunting For fear of little men ; Wee folk, good folk, Trooping all together; Green jacket, red cap, And white owl's feather!
Page 87 - UP the airy mountain, Down the rushy glen, We daren't go a-hunting For fear of little men; Wee folk, good folk, Trooping all together; Green jacket, red cap, And white owl's feather! Down along the rocky shore Some make their home, They live on crispy pancakes Of yellow tide-foam ; Some in the reeds Of the black mountain lake, With frogs for their watch-dogs, All night awake.
Page 186 - Of heirloom jewels, prized so much, Were many changed to chips and clods, And even statues of the gods Crumbled beneath its touch. Then angrily the people cried, " The loss outweighs the profit far; Our goods suffice us as they are; We will not have them tried.
Page 109 - By the shore, a plot of ground Clips a ruined chapel round, Buttressed with a grassy mound ; Where day and night and day go by, And bring no touch of human sound.
Page 110 - The empty ruins, lapsed again Into Nature's wide domain, Sow themselves with seed and grain As Day and Night and Day go by; And hoard June's sun and April's rain.
Page 102 - She linger'da moment, — she might not stay. How long since I saw that fair pale face! Ah ! Mother dear ! might I only place My head on thy breast, a moment to rest, While thy hand on my tearful cheek were prest.
Page 101 - I went to the window to see the sight ; All the Dead that ever I knew Going one by one and two by two. On they...
Page 88 - They stole little Bridget For seven years long ; When she came down again Her friends were all gone. They took her lightly back, Between the night and morrow, They thought that she was fast asleep, But she was dead with sorrow.

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