Ireland's New Religious Movements

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Olivia Cosgrove, Laurence Cox, Carmen Kuhling
Cambridge Scholars Publishing, Oct 12, 2010 - Religion - 425 pages
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Until recently, Irish religion has been seen as defined by Catholic power in the South and sectarianism in the North. In recent years, however, both have been shaken by widespread changes in religious practice and belief, the rise of new religious movements, the revival of magical-devotionalism, the arrival of migrant religion and the spread of New Age and alternative spirituality.

This book is the first to bring together researchers exploring all these areas in a wide-ranging overview of new religion in Ireland. Chapters explore the role of feminism, Ireland as global ‘Celtic’ homeland, the growth of Islam, understanding the New Age, evangelicals in the Republic, alternative healing, Irish interest in Buddhism, channelled teachings and religious visions.

This book will be an indispensable handbook for professionals in many fields seeking to understand Ireland’s increasingly diverse and multicultural religious landscape, as well as for students of religion, sociology, psychology, anthropology and Irish Studies. Giving an overview of the shape of new religion in Ireland today and models of the best work in the field, it is likely to remain a standard text for many years to come.

 

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Contents

CHAPTER ONE
1
CHAPTER TWO
28
PART ONE
51
PART TWO
199
LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS
358
BIBLIOGRAPHY
360
CONTRIBUTORS
405
INDEX
408
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Carmen Kuhling (Senior Lecturer in Sociology, University of Limerick) is author of several books on Ireland, modernity and the New Age. Laurence Cox (Lecturer in Sociology, National University of Ireland Maynooth) is author of various pieces on the history of Irish Buddhism. Peter Mulholland (Independent Scholar) holds a PhD in anthropology from NUIM and specialises in the study of Irish religiosity. Olivia Cosgrove (PhD Candidate in Sociology, University of Limerick) is carrying out research on religion, globalisation and identity.

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